Saturday, September 02, 2017

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for Friday, September 1, 2017:

-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Sept. 1, 2017
* NYNY1709.01

- Birds Mentioned

BLACK-CAPPED PETREL+
AUDUBON’S SHEARWATER+
WHITE-FACED STORM-PETREL+
LEACH'S STORM-PETREL+
BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETREL+
RUFF+
WHITE-WINGED DOVE+

(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Mourning Dove
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
American Golden-Plover
UPLAND SANDPIPER
Whimbrel
HUDSONIAN GODWIT
MARBLED GODWIT
Stilt Sandpiper
BAIRD’S SANDPIPER
White-rumped Sandpiper
BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER
Pectoral Sandpiper
Western Sandpiper
Long-billed Dowitcher
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
Parasitic Jaeger
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Roseate Tern
Royal Tern
Cory’s Shearwater
Great Shearwater
Wilson’s Storm-Petrel
Northern Gannet
Common Nighthawk
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
Purple Martin
Cliff Swallow
Worm-eating Warbler
Tennessee Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Mourning Warbler
Hooded Warbler
Cape May Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Wilson’s Warbler
DICKCISSEL
Bobolink

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44nybirdsorg

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, September 1,
2017 at 11:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are pelagic trip results including BLACK-CAPPED PETREL, WHITE-FACED, BAND-RUMPED and LEACH'S STORM-PETRELS, AUDUBON’S SHEARWATER, good shorebird variety including a RUFF, MARBLED and HUDSONIAN GODWITS, BUFF-BREASTED, BAIRD’S and UPLAND SANDPIPERS, and RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, WHITE-WINGED DOVE, DICKCISSEL and much more.

A pelagic trip Sunday aboard the Brooklyn VI out of Sheepshead Bay got to some warm water well past the hundred mile mark and with a very productive chum slick recorded at least five BLACK-CAPPED PETRELS, a nice collection of STORM-PETRELS that included 61 BAND-RUMPED, 29 LEACH’S, 1 WHITE-FACED and 320 WILSON’S, 2 AUDUBON SHEARWATERS along with 5 GREAT and 7 CORY’S SHEARWATERS and 3 RED-NECKED PHALAROPES.

Among the shorebirds, the most unusual was a female RUFF, known as a REEVE, spotted Saturday on the flats at Cupsogue County Park in Westhampton Dunes

At Jones Beach West End a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE visited the pools west of the Roosevelt Nature Center on Tuesday and Wednesday. These pools also produced an HUDSONIAN GODWIT Tuesday, this bird later noted on the bar by the Coast Guard Station before disappearing. On Thursday at West End a MARBLED GODWIT visited the tidal bar across the inlet from the Coast Guard Station, that same day finding another at Cupsogue.

Today up to 5 RED-NECKED PHALAROPES appeared in the breakers along Long Island Sound off Southold a little east of Goldsmith's Inlet on the North Fork.

Out on the sod fields on the east side of Doctors Path north of Riverhead up to 4 BUFF-BREASTED and 2 BAIRD’S SANDPIPERS have been present during the week. Other BUFF-BREASTEDS this week have included one off Beach 38th Street in Rockaway, 1 at Heckscher State Park and a flyby at Robert Moses State Park today, and one or two at Miller Field on Staten Island last weekend.

Up to 4 AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVERS have been east of Doctors Path since Saturday, with 2 more along Hulse Landing Road in Calverton from Wednesday and one at Cupsogue Thursday.

Last Saturday an UPLAND SANDPIPER flew over the East Pond at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge for the shorebird festival, the same day finding one at Miller Field.

A LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER was reported from Cupsogue yesterday.

At the parking lot pool at Orchard Beach in Pelham Bay Park another surprise visit involved 2 WHIMBREL dropping in there Tuesday and Wednesday, and other WHIMBRELS included 3 just west of the Ponquogue bridge at Shinnecock Monday and 2 at Cupsogue during the week.

Also off Shinnecock Inlet Monday were a ROSEATE and 10 BLACK TERNS, 3 CORY’S SHEARWATERS, 5 NORTHERN GANNETS and a PARASITIC JAEGER. Other shorebirds included small numbers of WESTERN, WHITE-RUMPED, PECTORAL and STILT SANDPIPERS on the East Pond of Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, these species also occurring at the Jones Beach West End pools.

An unexpected non-shorebird reported at Doctors Path last Saturday was a WHITE-WINGED DOVE flying by with a MOURNING DOVE, its wing patches providing the sole identifying feature, hopefully correctly.

The peak for ROYAL TERNS was the 44 counted at Cupsogue Saturday, and 2 CASPIAN TERNS were at Brooklyn's Plumb Beach Sunday and at Crab Meadow Beach Thursday.

COMMON NIGHTHAWKS have begun their fall exodus from the northeast, a peak count of 150 moving over Marshlands Conservancy in Rye Thursday evening, with near that tonight.

Among the increasing numbers of landbirds moving through now have been a DICKCISSEL over Fort Tilden Friday, various FLYCATCHERS including OLIVE-SIDED and YELLOW-BELLIED, BLACK-BILLED and YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOOS, PURPLE MARTINS and CLIFF SWALLOWS, BOBOLINKS and 2 dozen species of WARBLERS including TENNESSEE, NASHVILLE, BAY-BREASTED, CAPE MAY, BLACKBURNIAN, BLACKPOLL, WORM-EATING, HOODED, WILSON’S and MOURNING.

To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734 4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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