Check out City Birder Tours, and Green-Wood sponsored tours on their calendar pages here.

Saturday, July 21, 2018

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, July 20, 2018

NYC Area-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* July 20, 2018
* LINY 1807.20

- BIRDS Mentioned

BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK+
WHITE-FACED IBIS+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Cory's Shearwater
Great Shearwater
Sooty Shearwater
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
LEACH'S STORM-PETREL
BROWN PELICAN
Tricolored Heron
Lesser Yellowlegs
WHIMBREL
Least Sandpiper
Stilt Sandpiper
POMARINE JAEGER
Parasitic Jaeger
LONG-TAILED JAEGER
Black Tern
Red-breasted Nuthatch

Greetings, this is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, July 20th, at 9:00 p.m.

The highlights of this week's tape are Black-bellied Whistling-Duck, White-faced Ibis, an incursion of Brown Pelicans, Leach's Storm-Petrel, Pomarine and Long-tailed Jaegers, and the ongoing shorebird migration.

The Black-bellied Whistling-Duck at Nissequogue River SP was last reported on Saturday the 14th but may very well still be present. Reports would be welcome, as we try to determine whether the second bird that has gone missing might be nesting.

Brown Pelican reports continue from all along the outer coast, including 2 at Old Inlet on several dates; 3 at Robert Moses SP on Saturday, plus singles there on Sunday, Tuesday, and today; and 8 at Breezy Point on Monday.

An adult White-faced Ibis in fading breeding plumage was seen at Captree Island on Saturday but has not been reported since. A Tricolored Heron was seen there on Sunday.

Seawatching has been generally slow with a few Cory's Shearwaters being regularly reported, as well as a few Great and Sooty Shearwaters. A three-hour effort at Robert Moses State Park today produced 16 Cory's and one Sooty Shearwater, as well as a Parasitic Jaeger.

Other reports from Robert Moses include a single Wilson's Storm-Petrel on Sunday, very scarce from land this summer.

A trip offshore on Saturday yielded Leach's Storm-Petrel and Pomarine and Long-tailed Jaegers.

Southbound shorebird migration is underway, with adults of all the regular early species being seen in many places. Whimbrels were widely reported in small numbers all along the outer coast during rainy weather on Sunday morning, as was a breeding-plumaged Black Tern, at Cupsogue County Park. A count of 12 Stilt Sandpipers at Jamaica Bay on Tuesday was lower than last week but still notable. Further east, at Heckscher State Park 3 Pectoral and 3 Stilt Sandpipers dropped in after Tuesday's heavy rainfall, along with the more numerous Lesser Yellowlegs and Least Sandpipers.

Passerine migration has commenced, with a nice swallow flight on Wednesday, following a cold front, and Red-breasted Nuthatches appearing early at several sites, perhaps portending a good fall flight.

To send in reports this week, while Tom Burke is away, email Shai Mitra or call him at 631-666-7624.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.
...Read more

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Treehugger Tuesday

From Mother Nature Network:

How to help wildlife during a heat wave
Noel Kirkpatrick
July 16, 2018, 10:19 a.m.

You're not the only one who has to figure out how to beat the heat. Wild animals also struggle to cope with heat waves and droughts.

Take, for instance, the tiny hedgehog. During England's recent intense heat wave, the hedgehogs were struggling to stay alive, particularly the babies. They needed water, and there was none to be had.

Luckily, concerned citizens stepped up and made sure hedgehogs had water. It's simple actions that make the difference, and here are some you can take to help wildlife in your area.

Keep the water flowing

First and foremost is making sure wild critters have enough water and easy access to it. As the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) explains, "Having convenient supplies of clean water can make a huge difference to the survival of local wild species such as birds, butterflies and small mammals, during times of extreme heat and drought."

This is especially true for small animals that may not have a wide range, or for animals that are more mobile but become dehydrated.

Keeping the water going in your yard won't require you to keep the hose on, either. Instead, make sure there's a birdbath in your yard and that the water is clean and fresh. (If you don't have a birdbath, consider getting one.) The NWF recommends setting up a drip jug near the birdbath, something that will allow water to fall into the birdbath. The watery ploink will attract birds to the water. Once there, they'll drink and cool off.

Of course, not all animals can get to a birdbath, nor do you necessarily want certain animals to be near the birdbath. (Looking at you, cats.) For smaller critters, like those previously mentioned hedgehogs, providing small, shallow bowls of water is the best way to make sure they get the hydration they need. If you don't have any small bowls, then the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) recommends placing a stick or stone in a bigger bowl so that the animal can climb its way out of the bowl after it has quenched its thirst.

The inclination to leave food out for the critters is understandable, but experts discourage it. The NWF says water is more important to the animals' overall survival — they can get by without food for a bit, but not water — and the RSPCA advises against feeding wildlife.

If you have a garden, then maintaining it will help critters and insects alike. An especially lush garden can provide shade that some animals may crave, and covering your beds with mulch will also help the soil stay a bit moist, and that will help worms and other insects. Water, of course, plays a part in this, and keeping your plants watered will attract insects that rely on the plants for food.

Helping wildlife with heat stress

In addition to needing water, animals may require some assistance with heat stress. Animals get overheated and dehydrated, the same as we do, and they manifest some of the same symptoms, including confusion, a loss of balance and collapsing. If you see animals that are normally in the trees on the ground, or if they're normally nocturnal and you see them during the day, chances are something is wrong.

Aiding wild animals suffering from heat stress can be tricky, and if you don't feel comfortable or safe doing so, don't. Contact animal services or veterinarians instead.

If you do feel comfortable, however, the RSPCA recommends wrapping the animal in a towel and containing it in a cardboard box. Provide the animal with water to drink in a cool, safe area. Dampening the towel or spritzing the animal with mist can also help cool down the critter. Seeking the assistance of professionals, however, is still recommended since human interactions can be stressful for animals. Should you need to transport the animal to a clinic, cool down the car first and minimize the noises inside the car.

And if you're harmed while helping an animal, seek medical assistance as soon as possible.
...Read more

Monday, July 16, 2018

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, July 21, 2018 to Sunday, July 22, 2018:

Eastern Long Island Audubon
Saturday, July 21, 2018, 8:00am
Dune Road Exploration
Leader: Eileen Schwinn
Meet at TIANA BEACH BAY SIDE PARKING LOT, in Hampton Bays. Since Super Storm Sandy, the Tiana Beach bay side has been a very welcome stop for resident birds, as well as early southward-bound migrating shore birds. Join us for a long stay at low tide, and perhaps, an exploration along other Hot Spots of Dune Road. Bring sunscreen, water, and a hat (although there is a covered pavilion to view from, if necessary). Town of Southampton Temporary Parking Permits will be available to non-residents. For more information, please contact Eileen Schwinn at beachmed@optonline.net or call: 516-662-7751 the day of the Field Trip. Rain or shine!

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Freshkills Park Alliance
Sunday, July 22, 2018, 3:00pm
Kayak Tour
Kayak through Freshkills Park and enjoy a two-mile excursion along the tidal waterways.
Read More
Sign Up

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Gateway National Recreation Area
Saturday, July 21, 2018, 10:00am to 11:00am
Birding by the Bay
Location: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Fees: Free
View Details

Sunday, July 22, 2018, 10:00am to 11:30am
Osprey Watch Guided Walk
Location: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Every Sunday Weekly from 05/20/2018 to 09/30/2018
Fees: free
Learn all about the amazing osprey on this guided walk of the West Pond Trail.
View Details

**********

Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, July 22, 2018
Birding in Peace
Summer Birding Sundays
Except for some lingering individuals, by the end of the first week in June nearly all the northbound migrants will have disappeared from the city. Locally nesting birds will be incubating eggs or busily raising their first broods. In July we should see the offspring of our resident Red-tailed Hawks bravely preparing to leave the nest. Warbler songs will be replaced by chirring Cicadas and the tweets of fledgling birds. Butterflies and dragonflies are abundant. By late-July, expect the arrival of the first southbound migrants.

Before our gates open to the general public, birding expert Rob Jett leads these peaceful Saturday/Sunday morning walking tours to discover the many birds that call Green-Wood home. Green-Wood’s official birding checklist is available to pick up from the security guard at the main entrance on 25th Street or to print here. Comfortable footwear is recommended.

$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members

Click here for our inclement weather policy.

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Linnaean Society of New York
Saturday, July 21, 2018
Orienteering in Central Park
Leader and registrar: Sherry Felix — slfelix@hotmail.com or 646-339-0138
Registration opens: Monday, July 9
Public transportation.
Meet at 77th Street and Central Park West at 6:00 pm
When you head into regions unknown in search of a special bird, you may think you can rely on your cell phone’s map and compass apps—but batteries die and GPS signals fade. This is why finding one’s way using an orienteering compass and understanding how to read topographic maps is still vital. Join former urban park ranger and Audubon environmental educator Sherry Felix in the Ramble and and learn how to navigate with a compass—plus a few ways to navigate without any aids at all. See how to get around an obstacle and try the new three-legged compass walk.

Please bring an orienteering compass with a transparent plastic plate, download and print the...

- orienteering exercise map, and the
- Tupelo Meadow triangulation exercise map.

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

**********

New York City Audubon Society
Saturday, July 21, 2018, 9:00am – 10:30am
Van Cortlandt Bird Walks
Guide: NYC Audubon with the Van Cortlandt Park Conservancy
Meet at Van Cortlandt Nature Center. The history of birding and Van Cortlandt Park are inseparable. Influential birders such as Roger Tory Peterson and Allan D. Cruickshank got their starts on Van Cortlandt’s ecologically diverse grounds. These walks celebrate the tradition set by these great ornithologists. Participants will look for various species of residents and migrants and discuss a wide range of avian topics. For more information, call 212-691-7483. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Saturday, July 21, 2018, 12pm – 3pm
Kingsland Wildflowers Open House Saturdays
Where: Kingsland Wildflowers Green Roof and Community Engagement Center, 520 Kingsland Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11222
Tour the native plant garden and visit our community engagement space as we open Kingsland Wildflowers to the general public on Open House Saturdays. Free. Email njackson@nycaudubon.org to learn more.

Sunday, July 22, 2018, 8:45am – 4:00pm
Croton Point Park
Guide: Gabriel Willow
Meet at Grand Central Station and travel in comfort aboard Metro-North to visit Croton Point Park, overlooking the Hudson River about one hour north of the city. This beautiful 500-acre park is a wonderful mix of forest, wetlands, and grasslands that are home to hard-to-find breeding bird species such as Indigo Bunting, Grasshopper Sparrow, Bobolink, and Eastern Meadowlark. Great Horned Owls, Willow Flycatchers, and Orchard Orioles breed in nearby woodlands. Bring lunch for a picnic in one of the riverside pavilions. Limited to 20. Round-trip Metro-North fare ($20.50) not included in trip price. $50 (35)
Click here to register

Sunday, July 22, 2018, 11:00am – 1:30pm
Kingsland Wildflowers: Newtown Creek Bike Tour
Where: Kingsland Wildflowers Green Roof and Community Engagement Center, 520 Kingsland Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11222
Join Newtown Creek Alliance for a guided bike tour to see and discuss ecological and industrial activity near and along the Newtown Creek shoreline. Once a vast tidal wetland, the Creek quickly became one of the busiest waterways in the county, leaving a significant legacy of environmental destruction and contamination, leading to the ultimate designation as a federal superfund. However, improvements are underway and the past 2 decades have seen improvements to water quality and with it a returning ecology where fish, crabs and a plethora of shorebirds now exist amongst the challenging conditions.

The bike tour will stop at key locations that highlight the industrial history, pollution issues and ecological activity along the Creek. The tour will take place almost exclusively within a heavy industrial zone. To minimize conflicts with traffic and noise, the tour will take place on a Sunday when most businesses are closed. Nevertheless, the route runs along industrial roads and is recommended for experienced bicyclists.

The tour will begin at Manhattan Avenue Street End Park in Greenpoint and end at Kingsland Wildflowers Green Roof (also in Greenpoint). Along the way, we will visit Long Island City, Blissville, Maspeth and East Williamsburg. Total route is approximately 10 miles. Participants are encouraged to bring water, sun protection and a small snack. There will be ample opportunity for photography and bird watching along the route as well. Space is limited. $5. Learn more and register on Eventbrite.

These events are run in conjunction with the Kingsland Wildflowers project and are made possible with generous support from the Greenpoint Community Environmental Fund and the Office of the New York State Attorney General and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

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Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, July 21, 2018
Bird Walks at Van Cortlandt Nature Center (in Van Cortlandt Park), Bronx
9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
Join NYC Audubon on a walk through the park to observe the many species of birds in Van Cortlandt Park.
Free!

Animal of the Month Club: Northern Harrier at Arthur Kill Road and Brookfield Avenue (in Brookfield Park), Staten Island
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
The Northern Harrier is considered one of the most agile and acrobatic raptor in North America. Join the Urban Park Rangers in Brookfield Park as we look for the Northern Harrier.
Free!

Sunday, July 22, 2018
Orchard Beach Lagoon Birding Excursion (Intermediate) at Pelham Bay Park, Bronx
9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.
Few experiences compare with being on the open water in New York City. Prior canoe experience preferred; for ages 8 and older. Registration is required.
Free!

The New York City Naturalist Club: Raptors of Inwood Hill Park at Isham Street and Seaman Avenue (in Inwood Hill Park), Manhattan
10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
The New York City Naturalist Club hosts a birding expedition, during which guests of all skill levels can watch for eagles under the guidance of the Urban Park Rangers. Binoculars are encouraged.
Free!

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Young Birders Club
Saturday July 21, 2018 (Rain date 7/22/18)
Nickerson Beach (Nassau County, Long Island)
Trip Leader: Josh Cantor
Member Josh Cantor will lead this trip. Josh, a junior at SUNY ESF, is halfway through his 2018 "Young Birder Odyssey" - aka Big Year (he had 372 species for the year as of June 16th!). A longtime resident Long Island birder, Josh is very familiar with Nickerson Beach and its wonderfully accessible nesting colonies.

This promises to be a very exciting trip! We'll be looking for breeding Common and Least Terns, American Oystercatchers, Piping Plovers, and Black Skimmers, along with other shorebirds on the beach. If you enjoy taking pictures of birds, you'll have some really fantastic opportunities on this trip!

Watch your Inbox for directions and details on meeting time and location.

Plan to bring binoculars and a camera!

Trip Registration Form due by 7/13/18
...Read more

Friday, July 13, 2018

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, July 13, 2018:

-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* July 13, 2018
* NYNY1807.13

- BIRDS Mentioned

BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK+
ARCTIC TERN+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Snow Goose
KING EIDER
Common Eider
Great Shearwater
BROWN PELICAN
CATTLE EGRET
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
WHIMBREL
Stilt Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Gull-billed Tern
Roseate Tern
Royal Tern
Black Skimmer
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
Worm-eating Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Prairie Warbler
BLUE GROSBEAK

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, July 13, 2018 at 7 pm.

The highlights of today's tape are BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK, BROWN PELICAN, ARCTIC TERN, KING EIDER, CATTLE EGRET, WHIMBREL and other shorebirds, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER and BLUE GROSBEAK.

The single BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK was still present today on the pond at Nissequogue River State Park. The pond entrance is off St. Johnland Road on the continuation of Kings Park Boulevard, and the pond is on the left by a small parking lot just before the Administration building circle.

A group of five BROWN PELICANS was reported on a sandbar at Cupsogue County Park in Westhampton Dunes late Wednesday afternoon; these were followed by three today in Bellport Bay off Old Inlet on Fire Island, west of Cupsogue, these perhaps part of the original group. Pelicans should be looked for anywhere along Long Island’s south shore or around any inlets.

A first-summer ARCTIC TERN visited the flats at Cupsogue last Sunday, and among the slowly increasing numbers of southbound shorebirds there was a STILT SANDPIPER on Wednesday.

Also in that region, the two male KING EIDERS of different ages were still with some COMMON EIDERS Tuesday, the flock usually along the rocks on the east side of the inner part of Shinnecock Inlet.

A CATTLE EGRET was noted from Great Kills Park on Staten Island last Saturday.

Pelagic reports were few this week, but some GREAT SHEARWATERS were spotted out east near Gardiner’s Island last Sunday. Also in that area, a ROYAL TERN made it out to Great Gull Island Tuesday and Wednesday, while others are slowly improving in numbers along Long Island’s south shore.

The good news from Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge is that the East Pond is rounding into prime condition for shorebirds. A visit there this morning produced 13 STILT SANDPIPERS and 579 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS as well as other anticipated earlier migrants, including GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS and LEAST and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS. A GULL-BILLED TERN and two BLACK SKIMMERS also visited the East Pond. Earlier last Saturday at Jamaica Bay a WHIMBREL was spotted in the bay west of the West Pond, where a lone SNOW GOOSE continues.

At Breezy Point Monday afternoon single ROSEATE TERN and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL were present, the gull continuing the next day. A few other LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS also remain at various gull gathering locations.

A male BLUE GROSBEAK, perhaps a continuing bird, was seen at Brooklyn’s Calvert Vaux Park Wednesday and today.

It appears that RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS nested successfully at Connetquot River State Park, with an immature accompanied by an adult seen there today. Another adult was also noted at a different location in Connetquot.

And this is the time to watch for floaters in our area, as birds not fully involved in breeding activities increasingly move about – this week city and other local parks have produced such WARBLERS as WORM-EATING, PRAIRIE, MAGNOLIA, and BLACK-AND-WHITE, and other similar wanderers are possible.

To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734 4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Nonplussed Red-tailed Hawk

Remember the immature Red-tailed Hawk with the two short adult, red tail feathers growing in? Look at how long they are now! You can also see some of the banded feathers of its youth beneath those two. Apparently, this individual has also gotten quite used to the regular mockingbird attacks in Green-Wood Cemetery. This year's three cemetery offspring still cry when mobbed by jays and mockingbirds. Big babies...



Thanks to Jim Demers for letting me use his footage shot during my walk this past Sunday.

Treehugger Tuesday

From Earther.com:

One of the World's Biggest Insurers Is Ditching Coal
Brian Kahn

Earlier this week, one of the biggest re-insurance companies in the world started implementing a policy reflecting the growing risk around new coal projects. Swiss Re announced on Monday it would no longer insure companies that get 30 percent of their revenue or generate 30 percent of their power from coal burned for energy (known in energy parlance as ‘thermal coal’).

It’s yet another sign that economics are turning against coal. The re-insurance giant, which underwrote $35.6 billion in non-life insurance contracts in 2016, is the latest in a string of re-insurers pulling back from one of the dirtiest sources of power generation on the planet. These companies aren’t doing it from the bottom of their hearts, though. This is about cold, hard cash and actuarial tables.

Swiss Re’s policy, which was announced in 2017, went into effect on Monday. The company said in its announcement that it “supports a progressive and structured shift away from fossil fuels.”

It follows on a 2016 policy that limits other forms of investments in coal mining and companies that generate at least 30 percent of their electricity from coal. Other insurance companies that stopped funding coal projects in various forms include Allianz, Dai-ichi Life Insurance, and Scor. Another giant in the business, Munich Re, has decided to keep funding coal projects despite being pressured by investors not to.

“This decision comes now after Swiss Re signed in December 2015 the Paris Pledge for Action to affirm our support for the Paris Climate Agreement,” a company representative told Earther. “With the decision to limit our exposure to thermal coal and develop a carbon risk model, Swiss Re established a consistent approach also on the liability side.”

Coal powered the Industrial Revolution, but its role in causing climate change has indeed turned it into a liability in two ways.

The first is that coal is a huge source of carbon pollution, with nearly double the emissions of natural gas (and infinitely more than zero-emissions renewables). As that pollution piles up in the atmosphere, it raises the risk of more extreme weather that can cost insurers a pretty penny.

Longer term climate impacts, like sea level rise, will only make insuring coastal areas a more costly endeavor. A recent Union of Concerned Scientists report showed that by 2045, upwards of 300,000 coastal homes worth roughly $117.5 billion will be at risk of chronic flooding. That’s a lot of potential losses insurers will have to pay out, and it’s only one type of catastrophe in one country. Why would insurers pay to prop up one of the industries that’s most responsible at the risk of turning their balance sheet upside down?

There’s also the issue of how the world’s energy mix will have to change in order to meet the Paris Agreement goal of limiting warming to 2 degrees Celsius. As of now, there’s simply no room for coal to exist in that world. And to keep our climate habitable, the transition away from coal will have to happen very soon. Economics are already causing the necessary shift in some countries, including the U.S. (despite efforts by the Trump administration to turn the coal industry around). The trend is likely to continue here and elsewhere and accelerate in the coming years.

That means coal companies could just walk away from mines and power plants, making them stranded assets and creating losses for insurance companies. In May, California’s Department of Insurance conducted a climate stress test of all insurers with $100 million in annual premiums doing business in the state (h/t GreenTech Media).

“The results of the scenario analysis by 2°Investing is consistent with Commissioner Jones’ Climate Risk Carbon Initiative determination that thermal coal presents long-term financial risks for investors,” the agency wrote in a release announcing the report.
...Read more

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, July 14, 2018 to Sunday, July 15, 2018:

Gateway National Recreation Area
Saturday, July 14, 2018, 10:00am to 11:00am
Birding by the Bay
Location: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Fees: Free
View Details

Saturday, July 14, 2018, 10:00am to 5:00pm
Jamaica Bay Festival
Location: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Join guides from Gateway NRA, Littoral Society, NYC Audubon, and Jamaica Bay/Rockaway Parks Conservancy for tours and programs celebrating the wildlife and diversity of Jamaica Bay.
View Details

Sunday, July 15, 2018, 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Nature- Birding Hiking Series
Location: Great Kills Park - Ranger Station Parking Lot
Join us for a hike along the trails and beach.
View Details

Sunday, July 15, 2018, 10:00am to 11:30am
Osprey Watch Guided Walk
Location: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Fees: free
Learn all about the amazing osprey on this guided walk of the West Pond Trail.
View Details

**********

Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, July 15, 2018
Birding in Peace
Summer Birding Sundays
Except for some lingering individuals, by the end of the first week in June nearly all the northbound migrants will have disappeared from the city. Locally nesting birds will be incubating eggs or busily raising their first broods. In July we should see the offspring of our resident Red-tailed Hawks bravely preparing to leave the nest. Warbler songs will be replaced by chirring Cicadas and the tweets of fledgling birds. Butterflies and dragonflies are abundant. By late-July, expect the arrival of the first southbound migrants.

Before our gates open to the general public, birding expert Rob Jett leads these peaceful Saturday/Sunday morning walking tours to discover the many birds that call Green-Wood home. Green-Wood’s official birding checklist is available to pick up from the security guard at the main entrance on 25th Street or to print here. Comfortable footwear is recommended.

$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members

Click here for our inclement weather policy.

**********

New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

**********

New York City Audubon Society
Saturday, July 14, 2018
City of Water Day Ecocruise
Guide: Gabriel Willow with the Waterfront Alliance
Boat launches TBA. As part of City of Water Day, a celebration of the waterways and harbors of New York City, NYC Audubon is offering a special ecocruise past Hoffman and Swinburne Islands exploring the natural history of the area. The tour leaves from Governors Island. Find more info about City of Water Day and ferries to Governors Island at www.nycaudubon.org. Registration required. Limited to 150. Free

Saturday, July 14, 2018, 6:30am – 1:00pm
Breeding Birds of Nickerson Beach and Marine Study Area
Guide: Tod Winston
Explore two popular birding spots with Tod Winston that are a little hard to get to for car-less New Yorkers. Departing early to beat the heat, we’ll first seek out breeding Common and Least Terns, American Oystercatchers, Piping Plovers, and Black Skimmers at Nickerson Beach. Then we’ll walk the boardwalks of the nearby Marine Nature Study Area in search of nesting Saltmarsh and Seaside Sparrows, as well as Osprey, herons, egrets, and shorebirds. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $98 (69)
Click here to register

Saturday, July 14, 2018, 9:00am – 10:30am
Van Cortlandt Bird Walks
Guide: NYC Audubon with the Van Cortlandt Park Conservancy
Meet at Van Cortlandt Nature Center. The history of birding and Van Cortlandt Park are inseparable. Influential birders such as Roger Tory Peterson and Allan D. Cruickshank got their starts on Van Cortlandt’s ecologically diverse grounds. These walks celebrate the tradition set by these great ornithologists. Participants will look for various species of residents and migrants and discuss a wide range of avian topics. For more information, call 212-691-7483. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Saturday, July 14, 2018, 10am – 4pm
Jamaica Bay Festival
With Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy, American Littoral Society
As part of City of Water Day, join us at Beach 108th Street in Rockaway Park, NY, for a fun family day celebrating Jamaica Bay with activities for all ages including nature walks, an art show, a fishing clinic, arts and crafts, games, and more. Explore the wild side of New York City with walking tours of Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge and Dead Horse Bay. Transportation from Beach 108th Street to activities will be provided. For more information, contact Elizabeth Stoehr at 347-690-0931 or elizabeth@jbrpc.org. No registration required. No Limit. Free

Saturday, July 14, 2018, 12pm – 3pm
It's Your Tern Festival
In case of rain, the festival will move indoors to Nolan Park House 17
With Trust for Governors Island, Friends of Governors Island, National Park Service, New York Harbor School, Earth Matter NY
Come celebrate Governors Island’s treasures: Common Terns and oysters! Common Terns, listed as a threatened species in New York State, have nested for several years on decommissioned piers on Governors Island’s waterfront. The colony has expanded over time and benefited recently from the introduction of oyster shells as a nesting material. Free activities at this year’s festival will include bird walks and talks, and hands-on activities for the whole family. Get to the festival by taking a ferry to Governors Island. For more information and directions to the Tern Festival, visit www.nycaudubon.org/tern-festival. No limit. Free

Sunday, July 15, 2018, 8am – 11am
Prospect Park Birdwalk
Guide: Gabriel Willow
Join Gabriel Willow for a leisurely walk to see late arriving migrants and breeding bird residents of “Brooklyn's backyard.” Beautiful Prospect Park has a wide variety of habitats that attract a large number of migrants and breeding bird species—significantly more than Central Park, in fact. We will explore the park's meadows, forests, and waterways in search of waterfowl, warblers, tanagers, and some of the other species that call the park home. Limited to 15. $36 (25) per walk
Click here to register


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NYCH2O
Saturday, July 14, 2018, 10am
Ridgewood Reservoir ​​​Community Tour
The Ridgewood Reservoir in Highland Park is a 50+ acre natural oasis that straddles the border of Brooklyn and Queens. Built in 1859 to supply the once independent City of Brooklyn with high quality water, it became obsolete with the addition of new reservoirs in the Catskills in the 1950’s and was decommissioned in the 1980’s. Since then, nature took its course in a perfect case study of ecological succession. A lush and dense forest has grown in its two outside basins while a freshwater pond with waterfowl sits in the middle basin.

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Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Saturday, July 14, 2018, 1:00pm – 3:00pm
Bloomingdale Park
Fifty years ago the area now known as the Bloomingdale Woods was a sandy, pine-oak woodland littered with everything imaginable; burnt cars, discarded housewares and un-recycled cans and bottles. A hike through the woodlands of Bloomingdale Park will reveal the effects of a half century of time and human intervention. Protectors of Pine Oak Woods fought a protracted fight to keep the woods a natural area. Participants will meet at the corner of McGuire Avenue and Ramona Avenue. For more information call Clay Wollney at 718-869-6327.
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Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, July 14, 2018
Bird Walks at Van Cortlandt Nature Center (in Van Cortlandt Park), Bronx
9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
Join NYC Audubon on a walk through the park to observe the many species of birds in Van Cortlandt Park.
Free!

Ridgewood Reservoir Community Tour at Ridgewood Reservoir, Queens
10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
Join us to explore this incredible natural resource in the heart of NYC.
Free!

Birding: Osprey Watch at Salt Marsh Nature Center (in Marine Park), Brooklyn
10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
New York City is home to an amazing abundance of wildlife. Our Urban Park Rangers will guide you to the best wildlife viewing spots in the urban jungle.
Free!

The New York City Naturalist Club: Evening Hawk Watch at Saint Marks Place and Avenue A (in Tompkins Square Park), Manhattan
5:00 p.m.–6:30 p.m.
New York City is home to an amazing abundance of wildlife. Our Rangers will guide you to the best wildlife viewing spots in the urban jungle.
Free!
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Saturday, July 07, 2018

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, July 6, 2018:

-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* July 6, 2018
* NYNY1807.06

- BIRDS Mentioned

BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK+
SANDWICH TERN+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

KING EIDER
Common Eider
Cory’s Shearwater
Sooty Shearwater
Great Shearwater
MANX SHEARWATER
Wilson’s Storm-Petrel
BROWN PELICAN
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
Whimbrel
Ruddy Turnstone
Least Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Parasitic Jaeger
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Gull-billed Tern
Black Tern
Royal Tern
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
SNOWY OWL
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Magnolia Warbler
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
BLUE GROSBEAK

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, July 6, 2018 at 11 pm.

The highlights of today's tape are BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK, BROWN PELICAN, SANDWICH TERN, SNOWY OWL, KING EIDER, MANX SHEARWATER, YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, BLUE GROSBEAK and more.

A BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK reappeared last Saturday at Nissequogue River State Park in Kings Park, though without its mate, last noted on Thursday June 28. The duck was still feeding on the pond yesterday. The park entrance is off Johnland Road on the continuation of Kings Park Boulevard, and the pond is on the left by a small parking lot just before the administration building circle.

This week's BROWN PELICANS featured two moving east off Fire Island last Saturday and four the next morning headed west off Robert Moses State Park field 2.

A SANDWICH TERN was seen very briefly last Saturday afternoon at Cupsogue County Park in Westhampton Dunes. Other terns at Cupsogue included three Royal Terns Saturday and one Thursday along with a BLACK TERN, and the beginnings of the southbound shorebird migration have also been in evidence there, with appearances of some SHORT BILLED DOWITCHERS, both GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS, three WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS last Saturday and a PECTORAL SANDPIPER Thursday, LEAST SANDPIPER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, four “WESTERN” WILLETS, and three WHIMBRELS Thursday. Other WHIMBRELS were noted Friday at Jones Beach West End and off Robert Moses State Park field
2.

Pelagic species have also produced some decent numbers late this week off Long Island’s south shore - at Cupsogue Thursday combined counts netted 3 MANX, 140 CORY’S, 9 GREAT and 3 SOOTY SHEARWATERS and a dozen WILSON’S STORM-PETRELS, while totals off Moses Park field 2 Friday included about 190 CORY’S, 3 GREAT and 4 SOOTY SHEARWATERS plus 8 WILSON’S STORM-PETRELS and a PARASITIC JAEGER.

A few LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS this week included five at Jones Beach West End Friday, and GULL-BILLED TERNS featured one at Brooklyn’s Plumb Beach last Saturday and four at Nickerson Beach today. Two BLACK TERNS were at Moses Park Tuesday.

Very odd and unexpected was a SNOWY OWL found Sunday on Rikers Island. The emaciated bird was turned over to rehabilitators for assistance.

At Shinnecock two male KING EIDERS continue with some COMMON EIDER, the flock usually seen along rocks on the east side of the inlet.

A YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER continues singing on territory at the Bayard Cutting Arboretum in Great River, and a male BLUE GROSBEAK was still present Thursday around the Calverton Grasslands in the Preston Ponds complex.

Two RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were continuing at Connetquot River State Park as of last Sunday, with another still at Muscoot Farm in Westchester County Monday.

Some presumably non-breeding floaters recently have included YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO and a few species of mostly regionally breeding warblers, including MAGNOLIA.

The RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH incursion also continues.

To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734 4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
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Thursday, July 05, 2018

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, July 7, 2018 to Sunday, July 8, 2018:

Bedford Audubon Society
Sunday, July 8, 2018, 10:00am - 12:00pm
The Butterflies of Muscoot Farm
Join Naturalist Tait Johansson for an early summer butterfly walk on the beautiful grounds of Muscoot Farm. Cost: Free. Level of difficulty: Easy.Register with Susan at info@bedfordaudubon.org or 914-302-9713.
See more details

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Freshkills Park Alliance
Sunday, July 08, 2018, 3:00pm
Kayak Tour
Kayak through Freshkills Park and enjoy a two-mile excursion along the tidal waterways.
Read More
Sign Up

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Gateway National Recreation Area
Saturday, July 7, 2018, 10:00am to 11:00am
Birding by the Bay
Location: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Fees: Free
View Details

Saturday, July 7, 2018, 12:00pm to 3:00pm
Plover Day
Location: Rockaway Beach near 86th Street
Join Urban Park Rangers and NPS to celebrate the piping plover, a state-listed threatened species that nests on New York City’s beaches.
View Details

Sunday, July 8, 2018, 10:00am to 11:30am
Osprey Watch Guided Walk
Location: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Fees: free
Learn all about the amazing osprey on this guided walk of the West Pond Trail.
View Details

Sunday, July 8, 2018, 2:00pm to 3:00pm
Salt Marsh Detectives
Location: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Children and their families are invited to find out what makes a salt marsh and why they are important.
View Details

Sunday, July 8, 2018, 10:00am to 12:30pm
Seaweeds, Seashells and More
Location: Fort Tilden, Building 1
Hike the seashore during an outgoing tide with American Littoral Society naturalist, Mickey Maxwell Cohen, author of Adventures at the Beach, to look for marine life, coastal birds, and seaside plants.
View Details

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Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, July 8, 2018
Birding in Peace
Summer Birding Sundays
Except for some lingering individuals, by the end of the first week in June nearly all the northbound migrants will have disappeared from the city. Locally nesting birds will be incubating eggs or busily raising their first broods. In July we should see the offspring of our resident Red-tailed Hawks bravely preparing to leave the nest. Warbler songs will be replaced by chirring Cicadas and the tweets of fledgling birds. Butterflies and dragonflies are abundant. By late-July, expect the arrival of the first southbound migrants.

Before our gates open to the general public, birding expert Rob Jett leads these peaceful Saturday/Sunday morning walking tours to discover the many birds that call Green-Wood home. Green-Wood’s official birding checklist is available to pick up from the security guard at the main entrance on 25th Street or to print here. Comfortable footwear is recommended.

$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members

Click here for our inclement weather policy.

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

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Linnaean Society of New York
Saturday, July 7, 2018
Staten Island Nesting Birds – Purple Martins Plus
Leader: Richard Veit
Registrar: Karen Asakawa — avocet501@gmail.com or 347-306-0690
Registration opens: Monday, June 25
Ride: $20

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New York City Audubon Society
Saturday, July 7, 2018, 8am – 5pm
Breeding Birds of the Hudson Highlands, NY
Guide: Gabriel Willow
Join Gabriel Willow on a day-long trip to some of the most exciting and beautiful birding locations in the Hudson Valley: Doodletown Road, Constitution Marsh, and Indian Brook Farm. We'll look for uncommon breeding warbler specialties at Doodletown, such as Cerulean, Hooded, Blue-winged, Golden-winged, and Worm-eating Warblers. We will then head to the Constitution Marsh Audubon Sanctuary, home to breeding Wood Ducks, Bald Eagles, Least Bitterns, Marsh Wrens, and more. After a picnic lunch, we will drive to Indian Brook Farm in search of breeding Field and Savannah Sparrows, Bobolinks, and Indigo Buntings. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $129 (90) per trip
Click here to register

Saturday, July 7, 2018, 12pm – 3pm
NYC Plover Day Festival at the Rockaways
With NYC Parks, American Littoral Society, Gateway National Recreation Area
Join us at Beach 86th and Rockaway Beach Boardwalk, Queens to celebrate nesting shorebirds. Discover one of New York City's endangered species, the Piping Plover, and ways you can help protect it by sharing the beach. Enjoy educational activities and crafts at this family-friendly event that raises awareness of this amazing shorebird. No Registration required. No Limit. Free

Saturday, July 7, 2018, 9:00am – 10:30am
Van Cortlandt Bird Walks
Guide: NYC Audubon with the Van Cortlandt Park Conservancy
Meet at Van Cortlandt Nature Center. The history of birding and Van Cortlandt Park are inseparable. Influential birders such as Roger Tory Peterson and Allan D. Cruickshank got their starts on Van Cortlandt’s ecologically diverse grounds. These walks celebrate the tradition set by these great ornithologists. Participants will look for various species of residents and migrants and discuss a wide range of avian topics. For more information, call 212-691-7483. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Sunday, July 8, 2018, 9:30am – 11:30am
Summer Birding Along the Hudson: Wave Hill
Guide: Gabriel Willow with Wave Hill
Meet at the Perkins Visitor Center. Naturalist Gabriel Willow contributes his extensive knowledge of bird species and their behaviors on these captivating walks. Wave Hill’s garden setting overlooking the Hudson River flyway provides the perfect habitat for resident and migrating birds. Ages 10 and up welcome with an adult. NYC Audubon members enjoy two-for-one admission (see www.wavehill.org for more information)

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Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, July 7, 2018
Bird Walks at Van Cortlandt Nature Center (in Van Cortlandt Park), Bronx
9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
Join NYC Audubon on a walk through the park to observe the many species of birds in Van Cortlandt Park.
Free!

Plover Day Festival at Beach 86th Street and Shorefront Parkway (in Rockaway Beach and Boardwalk), Queens
12:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
Join us to celebrate nesting shorebirds! Enjoy educational activities and crafts at this family friendly event that raises awareness about the piping plover.
Free!

Sunday, July 8, 2018
Summer Birding at Perkins Visitors Center (in Wave Hill), Bronx
9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
Naturalist Gabriel Willow contributes his extensive knowledge of diverse bird species and their behavior on these walks through the gardens and woodlands.
...Read more

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