Check out City Birder Tours, and Green-Wood sponsored tours on their calendar pages here.

Saturday, March 31, 2018

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, March 30, 2018:

-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Mar. 30, 2018
* NYNY1803.30

- Birds Mentioned

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE
EURASIAN WIGEON
RED-NECKED GREBE
AMERICAN BITTERN
Great Egret
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
Glossy Ibis
Osprey
American Oystercatcher
Wilson’s Snipe
Greater Yellowlegs
RAZORBILL
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Laughing Gull
ICELAND GULL
LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL
SNOWY OWL
Eastern Phoebe
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Louisiana Waterthrush
Palm Warbler
Pine Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
Common Grackle
Boat-tailed Grackle

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44nybirdsorg

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, March 30, 2018 at 8:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are BLACK-HEADED, ICELAND and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS, GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE, EURASIAN WIGEON, RED-NECKED GREBE, SNOWY OWL, RAZORBILL, AMERICAN BITTERN and a few more spring arrivals.

This week’s highlight was perhaps no nor’easter to deal with, providing opportunities for a few more spring migrants to arrive, but winter birds still dominate locally. A few sightings of BLACK-HEADED GULL include an adult coming into breeding plumage seen as recently as Thursday near Coney Island Creek as viewed from Calvert Vaux Park. A LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL was also present there.

An immature BLACK-HEADED GULL has also been visiting Gravesend Bay, seen at the middle parking lot off the eastbound Belt Parkway up to Thursday, this perhaps the same BLACK-HEADED spotted at the Marine Park Salt Marsh Nature Center Saturday and Wednesday.

An ICELAND GULL has also been in the Gravesend Bay/Coney Island Creek area up to today, and among other scattered LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were three at Robert Moses State Park and two at Calvert Vaux Park today.

Among the lingering waterfowl, a GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was still on Tung Ting Pond in Centerport last Saturday, and a pair of Eurasian Wigeon was noted at Brooklyn Army Terminal Pier 4 today, with a drake still at the Marine Park Salt Marsh Nature Center last weekend.

A number of RED-NECKED GREBES about have included one still at the Restoration Pond at Alley Pond Park today, one at the Salt Marsh Nature Center Wednesday and Thursday, one off Floyd Bennett Field Wednesday, and two in Gravesend Bay today.

After a slow winter except at Montauk Point, RAZORBILLS made a move Wednesday morning when 31 were counted off Robert Moses State Park, mostly headed eastward.

With a few still around, lingering SNOWY OWLS this week were noted within the New York City limits at Breezy Point, Floyd Bennett Field and the Rockaways.

A nice find today was an AMERICAN BITTERN perched in a Tupelo at Tupelo Field in Central Park, while rather odd for Central Park has been a female-type BOAT-TAILED GRACKLE apparently lingering in the southeastern section of the park with a COMMON GRACKLE flock.

Among the newer arrivals this week, these noted today, were some GLOSSY IBIS along the south shore of Long Island, including 48 at Timber Point, a NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW at Randalls Island, and single Brooklyn LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSHES in Prospect Park and Greenwood Cemetery. Increases this week were noted for GREAT EGRET, YELLOW-CROWNED and BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERONS, OSPREY, AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER, GREATER YELLOWLEGS, WILSON’S SNIPE, LAUGHING GULL, EASTERN PHOEBE, PINE and PALM WARBLERS, and CHIPPING SPARROW.

To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734 4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Treehugger Tuesday

From the website Earther:

National Parks Are About to Get a Bunch of Birds They Didn't Ask For
Brian Kahn
Thursday 6:00pm

Acadia National Park is warbler heaven. During the summer, you can hear everything from the rising call of the black-throated blue warbler to the tinkling bell-like call of the black-and-white warbler. Keep your eyes on the underbrush for tell-tale the yellow breast of the Canada warbler, or heavy thickets for the mourning warbler. In all, 25 species of warbler currently occupy park, shaping the ecosystem and soundscape.

But the avian sights and sounds will likely be completely different in just a few decades.

If climate change continues on its current trajectory, 20 of the 25 warblers that currently occupy the park will have no suitable climate. They could be forced to move or perish. Meanwhile, other species could swoop in to take their place.

Acadia is just one datapoint in a massive new study published in PLOS One on Wednesday that looks at how climate change will impact birds across the national park system. Similar stories are likely to play out everywhere from Yosemite’s granite high country to Yellowstone’s bubbling hydrothermal basins, with the study projecting nearly a quarter of bird species will turnover in parks by 2050.

That means that the 300 million annual visitors to parks will, in the future, have a completely different experience. And it means managers will have to make some big decisions on what landscapes they conserve and what species they manage for.

“There’s this recognition of the end of stationarity,” Gregor Schuurman, an ecologist with the National Park Service who worked on the study, told Earther, citing a seminal 2008 ecology paper. “We’re not an intensive management agency, we’re an agency trying to preserve things unimpaired. The end of climate stationarity is a real challenge for us and our thinking.”

Schuurman worked with scientists at the Audubon Society to apply the techniques used in a 2014 paper about climate change’s impact on the 513 species of North American birds to 277 of the 417 sites managed by National Park Service. Data on the historical distribution of these birds came courtesy Audubon’s citizen science bird counts that have taken place for decades. If you’ve participated in those, congratulations, you are now a contributor to a scientific paper.

The researchers fed that data into models that project the climate out to mid-century if emissions continue on their current trajectory, as well as if we made major cuts, and looked at how 17 climate variables—things like mean temperature, daily temperature range, and precipitation in specific months—affected traditional bird ranges across summer and winter.

The result show that between native birds leaving and colonizers showing up, parks will see a 23 percent shift in the types of birds found there if things continue on their current trend (the results are markedly better for birds if we cut emissions). In both winter and summer, new colonizers will outnumber those making an exodus, but the shift is far more pronounced in winter. Joanna Wu, a biologist with the Audubon Society who led the research, told Earther that a number of species that usually migrate to warmer climates in winter may also just stay in certain parks year-round.

Jenny McGuire, an ecologist at Georgia Tech who has done landscape modeling but didn’t work on this study, told the Earther the findings show “that birds will need more food and nesting sites than ever before within the National Parks and points to the critical importance of maintaining or growing park sizes as bird species move into them.”

For hardcore birders—who are part of an estimated $107-billion industry—Schuurman said the study offers a heads up on what species they should be keeping an eye out for.

“I can imagine Big Bend likely seeing new species never before seen in the U.S.,” he said about the park located on the Texas-Mexico border. “Birders may be interested and excited to recording new arrivals.”

But more pressing is what climate change means for park managers. Should Acadia’s superintendent prioritize preserving habitat that lets species living on the southern end of their range hang around a bit longer, or protect habitat that might be more suitable for new arrivals, some of whom may be endangered?

And that doesn’t even get into what climate change will do to the landscapes themselves, the food sources birds rely on and other factors that the current study didn’t weigh into its projections. Even in the absence of perfect information about all those relationships, Schuurman said managers better be thinking about them.

“If we’re talking water birds, do you have aquatic habitat or is there something about climate change that leads you to think we will in the coming decades? You have to have the pieces to put together,” he said.

The choices parks end up making around birds will have huge impacts on other animals as well, since birds with their fancy wings and ability to cover great distances are usually a sign of what’s to come.

“It’s going to challenging to manage for our shifting baseline in the future,” Wu said. “Birds are one of the first responders.”
...Read more

Monday, March 26, 2018

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, March 31, 2018 to Sunday, April 1, 2018:

Audubon Center in Prospect Park
Saturday, March 31, 12pm – 1pm
Introduction to Birdwatching
Join Prospect Park Alliance for a birdwatching walk and learn about Prospect magnificent array of birds and how to identify them!

Sunday, April 1, 2018, 8am – 9am
Early Morning Bird Walk: Changing Seasons, Changing Birds
Join Prospect Park Alliance to welcome the earliest migrants of the year, and to say goodbye to some of our winter residents. This birdwatching tour is led by the Brooklyn Bird Club and leaves promptly at 8am.

**********

Brooklyn Bird Club
Saturday, March 31, 2018
Staten Island’s newest park: Brookfield Park
Leader Peter Dorosh
Focus: Initial BBC species list for our first exploration of this new park
Car Fee: $22.00
Registrar: Peter Dorosh Prosbird@aol.com or text only cell 347-622-3559
Registration Period: March 24th – March 29th
Some information about the park: https://tinyurl.com/brookfieldpark
Map: https://tinyurl.com/brookfieldparkmap
Note: The group may also visit Great Kills Park, time permitting.

Please review our general trip information and guidelines on this page.

**********

Gateway National Recreation Area
Saturday, March 31, 2018
East Pond Exploration
Location: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Fees: Free
Spring Naturalist Series- Each week through the spring, join us to learn more about the ecology of Jamaica Bay.
View Details

**********

Hudson River Audubon Society
Saturday, March 31, 2018
Jones Beach – Early Spring Arrivals
Meet at 8am at the Coast Guard Station in West End II
A variety of birds should be seen from seabirds, ducks, hawks, shorebirds and early land migrants.
http://hras.org/wtobird/jonesbeach.html

**********

New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

**********

New York City Audubon Society
Saturday, March 31, 2018, 5:00pm – 9:30pm
The Sky-Dance of the Woodcock
Where: Floyd Bennett Field, Brooklyn, NY
Guide: Gabriel Willow
The American Woodcock is a remarkable bird. It is in the sandpiper family but lives in woodlands, often far from beaches. The male performs an incredible crepuscular aerial display and song early in the spring, soon after the snow melts in the northern U.S. We’ll look for it (and bats, owls, and other critters) at Floyd Bennett Field. Bring a headlamp or flashlight and a snack. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $92 (64) per trip
Click here to register

**********

North Shore Audubon
Saturday, March 31, 9:30am – 12:00pm
Muttontown Preserve
Leader: Ralph -‭ (516) 785-3375‬

Please inform walk leader that you are attending.
See "Walk Locations" for directions.
Meet in westernmost parking lot.
Wear water-resistant footwear, bring binoculars and drinking water. Wear long pants and socks so you do not touch poison ivy.

**********

Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Saturday, March 31, 2018, 12:00pm – 2:00pm
Conference House Park
Enjoy a wintery, natural history tour of Staten Island’s southernmost woodland at Ward’s point and a discussion of the Lenape Indians. Utilizing stone tools from the Archaic and Woodland periods Ray Matarazzo will demonstrate hunting, building and cold weather survival skills. Participants will meet at the Conference House Park Visitors Center at 7455 Hylan Boulevard.
For more information contact Ray Matarazzo at 718-317-7666.

**********

Urban Park Rangers
Sunday, April 1, 2018
Birding at Pelham Bay Nature Center (in Pelham Bay Park), Bronx
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Birding programs are appropriate for all skill levels and beginners are welcome. To enhance your experience bring binoculars, or ask a Ranger to borrow a pair.
Free!
...Read more

Friday, March 23, 2018

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, March 23, 2018:

- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Mar. 23, 2018
* NYNY1803.23

- Birds mentioned
MEW GULL+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE
EURASIAN WIGEON
Red-necked Grebe
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
Osprey
Piping Plover
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Laughing Gull
ICELAND GULL
Tree Swallow

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, March 23rd 2018 at 8pm. The highlights of today's tape are MEW GULL, BLACK-HEADED GULL, ICELAND GULL, GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE, EURASIAN WIGEON and a few seasonal arrivals.

Still with a winter flavor but somewhat impacted by the March doldrums and our parade of Nor'easters this week's tape does feature another MEW GULL sighting. This of an adult spotted Sunday morning at the Brooklyn Army Terminal Piers Park. It was photographed as it fed alongside one of the piers but soon disappeared and could not be relocated. This is possibly the same bird found at Floyd Bennett Field last Friday. An immature BLACK-HEADED GULL was seen again Tuesday afternoon at Gravesend Bay in Brooklyn occurring around the middle parking lot off the eastbound Belt Parkway. This an often productive site for gulls. An ICELAND GULL in Brooklyn Thursday was at the Veteran's Memorial Pier.

Among the lingering unusual waterfowl have been a GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE present Sunday at Belmont Lake State Park and another continuing through yesterday at Tung Ting Pond in Centerport. A drake EURASIAN WIGEON was still present at least up to Tuesday at the Salt Marsh Nature Center at Marine Park in Brooklyn. A RED-NECKED GREBE was still on the Restoration Pond at Alley Pond Park in Queens on Tuesday and another was still around the Point Lookout Lido Marina on Monday.

Rather unusual, a small group of 6 EURASIAN GOLDFINCHES have apparently survived the winter on Governors Island, which reopens to the public on May 1st. Historically an introduced colony had done fairly well on western Long Island to the late 1950s but then died off with only presumed escapes popping up in city parks and elsewhere since then. It will be interesting to see how these birds fare.

Among the few spring migrants appearing here, despite the weather, have been coastal PIPING PLOVER as of Saturday and YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON as of Monday. There have also been more sightings this week of OSPREY, LAUGHING GULL and TREE SWALLOWS.

To phone in reports on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Green-Wood Cemetery pre-Spring Walk

This past Sunday I lead an enthusiastic group of birders in Brooklyn's Green-Wood Cemetery looking for early-Spring migrants and overwintering species. A brilliant sun, cloudless blue sky and calm winds belied upper 20˚ temperatures, however a significant increase in birdsong told me that our avian friends were excited about Spring's imminent arrival. As I write this, however, New York City is being enveloped in a late season snow storm of possible historic proportions. Spring time now seems like a pipe dream months away.

Sunday's walk was the second part of a two day class on birding basics for beginners. I was cautiously optimistic that we would see many of the typical overwintering species seen around our area. It had been an unusual few months, though, as periods of blustery, extremely cold weather had several of the expected species seen in either very low numbers or not at all. Some examples are Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, chickadee, titmouse, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Brown Creeper, goldfinch, Fox Sparrow, Dark-eyed Junco and White-throated Sparrow.

On the low rise at the south edge of the Valley Water we spotted a flock of sparrows scratching the ground beneath a stand of Yew trees. After a quick scan I was surprised to see that it was composed almost entirely of Fox Sparrows. We normally see a few of these robust, rusty-colored sparrows scattered within mixed flocks of other birds during the winter, not in homogeneous flocks. I told the group to keep their ears peeled for its rich, sweet, slurred song as they prepare for the breeding season. We ended up hearing them throughout the cemetery.

This winter a pair of Carolina Wrens had taken up residence near the Sylvan Water. As we descended the stairway at Sylvan Bluff the rolling "tea-kettle, tea-kettle, tea-kettle" song of this wren drew our attention to his low perch on the steep ridge next to Sylvan Avenue. We watched as his serenade ultimately called in his mate. It apparently also drew the attention of an immature Red-tailed Hawk. They exchanged places as the wrens flew across to the opposite side of the road and the hawk perched briefly in front of us on the ridge.

Dark-eyed Juncos have been nearly non-existent in the cemetery this winter. On Sunday, however, their numbers seemed to have increased considerably, with several medium-sized flocks scattered around the area. Most were picking through the seeds remaining on the ground beneath stands of Sweetgum trees. Several males were perched above the crowds, announcing their breeding intentions with a high-pitched musical trill.

As waterfowl begin their northbound spring push through the area I was hopeful that we'd see something other than Mallards and Canada Geese on the cemetery's kettle ponds. The only other species we observed, though, was a single male Wood Duck on a now nearly overflowing Dell Water. In recent years this beautiful woodland waterfowl has begun nesting in adjacent Prospect Park. I'm hopeful this guy finds a mate and does the same in Green-Wood Cemetery.

Along the edge of Vernal Avenue is a stretch of several Japanese pagoda trees (Styphnolobium japonicum). I mentioned to the group that I wanted to check them for Cedar Waxwings as the stringbean-like fruit of this species is a favorite winter food source. Approaching the trees I heard their distinctive thin, high-pitched sighing whistle. A flock of about forty of these colorful birds were alternately feeding on the pale green fruits on the ground, then flying into the trees. The hungry birds seemed nearly tame as we watched their amusing acrobatics from only a few yards away.

I wrapped up the walk by checking in on the annual Red-tailed Hawk nest tree to see if the pair had begun repairing their nest yet. Before we even got to the nest, I spotted the male perched in an oak tree above the roadway. He clutched the remains of a kill in his talons. As we watched he called his mate a couple of times. This is typical courtship behavior ("I've brought you some lunch, honey"). We didn't hear or see his mate in the short time we watched, but I did point out a Blue Jay making a poor imitation of the response. That's a good way to become the next meal.

One of the target species of Sunday's walk was American Woodcock. I'd seen a single individual hanging around "The Flats" for the past couple of weeks, but was unable to locate the bird Sunday. I assumed more will be moving through the area shortly and am concerned that with today's snowstorm there might be a repeat of last year's woodcock "snowpocalypse". As an early migrant I assume this odd little woodland bird would be adapted to these weather events, especially since their North American populations seem to be very healthy. I have another walk this coming Sunday. Hopefully the snow will be melted and lots of singing Spring migrants will be filling the trees and shrubs of the cemetery. Or another unexpected blizzard will...
...Read more

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Treehugger Tuesday

In honor of today’s start of Spring, from the website Treehugger:

7 quirky facts about the vernal equinox
Melissa Breyer
March 15, 2018

From dancing tree fairies to the reality of spring fever, there’s more to the March equinox than almost-equal night and day.

There is really no secret as to why the change from winter to spring has been celebrated throughout time. Even for those with the luxury of things like insulated homes and off-season food, winter can be hard and spring is beautiful. It’s a magical time, and both the body and spirit rejoice with the increase in sunlight and a wakening world.

This year, the equinox falls on Tuesday, March 20 at 12:15 p.m. Eastern Time … and not a minute too soon. That the March equinox signals the first day of Spring – for those in the northern hemisphere; and the first day of winter for those in the south – is a well-known fact. Lesser known are some of the more curious occurrences that the day and impending season have to offer. Consider the following.

1. You say equinox, I say equilux
While “equinox” comes from the Latin for equal night, you probably have heard that actually, day and night are not exactly equal on the equinox. Why? The sun may be crossing the celestial equator, but sunlight can be a fickle thing. Because the sun is a disk and not a point, and because of atmospheric refraction, those of us at mid-temperate latitudes actually get about an extra 8 minutes of daylight on the equinox. For the exact split, we have the unsung hero called the equilux, from the Latin for equal light, which comes a few days before its much-more famous sibling, the equinox.

2. Spring fever is deployed
You may know the symptoms; a flushed face, increased heart rate, daydreaming and a delicious inclination towards romance – all wrapped up in a very strong desire to ditch the drudgery and go outside and frolic. The prognosis? Spring fever. And as it turns out, there may be more to it than emotional exuberance that winter is over. There is plenty of anecdotal evidence suggesting a biological basis for the boost of mood, desire and energy that comes with the vernal equinox. Although the exact causes remain elusive, it’s likely that hormones play a role.

3. Things get precise
The fall and spring equinoxes are the only two days during the year when the sun rises exactly due east and sets exactly due west. As a way to hone your sense of direction, pick a landmark from a vantage point where you live and note where the sun rises and sets on the equinox – now you’ll always know east and west.

4. The Great Sphinx gazes directly into the sunrise
Although of course we’re not supposed to look directly at the sun, on the morning of the equinox the Great Sphinx of Giza does exactly that. There are a number of other ancient sites that play tricks with the equinox as well, like Chichen Itza and Angkor Wat.

5. Easter is determined
The vernal equinox is like a calendar marker to determine what date Easter will fall on. In the year 325, the Council of Nicaea decided that Easter would be held on the first Sunday after the first full moon occurring on or after the vernal equinox. If the full moon falls on Sunday, Easter gets pushed back a week so that it doesn’t coincide with Passover.

6. The fairies come out to dance
The Anjana of Spanish Cantabrian mythology are beautiful 6-inch-tall fairies who take care of the forests. They can communicate with water, help injured animals and storm-damaged trees, and guide those who become lost in the woods. Goals! During the night of the vernal equinox they flock to the fells and dance until dawn, scattering roses all about. Those crazy party pixies. Anyone lucky enough to find one of their floral gifts – a rose with purple, green, blue, or golden petals – will have happiness for the rest of their life.

7. Earth isn’t the only planet to have all the fun
Saturn gets in on the equinox action too! Though it’s a bit harder earned. Saturn also has an equinox every spring and autumn, but since seasons on the ringed planet are a bit more, you know, languid, the wait between equinoxes is notable. With a trip around the sun taking Earth 30 years, Saturn’s equinoxes occur about every 15 years.
...Read more

Monday, March 19, 2018

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, March 24, 2018 to Sunday, March 25, 2018:

Audubon Center in Prospect Park
Saturday, March 24, 12pm – 1pm
Introduction to Birdwatching
Join Prospect Park Alliance for a birdwatching walk and learn about Prospect magnificent array of birds and how to identify them!

**********

Bedford Audubon Society
Saturday, March 24, 2018, 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Vernal Pools at Hunt-Parker Sanctuary
Under the leadership of long-term BAS member Paul Lewis, we will visit these hidden treasures deep in the forest and learn about the vital importance of these seasonal wetlands as spawning areas for salamanders and other amphibians. This program is suitable for children aged 10 and above.
Cost: Free
Level of difficulty: Moderate
Meet at Bylane Farm at 12:45pm wearing boots.
Please register with Susan Fisher at info@bedfordaudubon.org or 914-302-9713.
See more details

**********

Brooklyn Bird Club
Sunday, March 25, 2018
Western shore of Brooklyn: Owls Head to Bush Terminal Parks
Leader: Bobbi Manian
Focus: early spring passerines, woodpeckers, sparrows, ducks, bay and marsh waterfowl
Car Fee: $10.00
Registrar: Dennis Hrehowsik email deepseagangster@gmail.com
Registration Period: March 17th – March 22nd
Please review our general trip information and guidelines on this page.

**********

Gateway National Recreation Area
Saturday, March 24, 2018, 10:00am to 1:00pm
Early Spring Bird Walk
Location: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Fees: Free
Spring Naturalist Series- Each week through the spring, join us to learn more about the ecology of Jamaica Bay.
View Details

**********

Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, March 25, 2018
Birding in Peace
Just because it’s winter, doesn’t mean that there aren’t interesting birds to discover in Green-Wood. For some bird species that migrate south after the breeding season, Brooklyn is their Miami during the cold months. Spend the early morning exploring the cemetery, looking for overwintering waterfowl, nuthatches, woodpeckers, sparrows, finches and any half-hardy birds that decided to stick around. By February we’ll see some of the early north-bound birds beginning to trickle back into the area.

$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members

Click here for our inclement weather policy.


**********

Huntington-Oyster Bay Audubon Society
Sunday, March 25, 2018 - 9:00am
Shu Swamp Preserve
There is no better place to celebrate the beginning of spring than this lovely preserve near Oyster Bay. We’ll look for the earliest migrants and the first blooms, while being serenaded by the rare Rusty Blackbird. Registration: 631-885-1881

Directions: Take Oyster Bay Rd west out of Oyster Bay town and turn north onto Beaver Brook Rd. Follow the road north as it becomes Frost Mill Rd, and look for the parking area on the left just before the train trestle.

**********

Linnaean Society of New York
Saturday, March 24, 2018
Brooklyn South Coastal Birding
Leader: Peter Dorosh
Registrar: Kathleen Howley — kathleenhowley@gmail.com or 212-877-3170
Registration opens: Monday, March 12
Ride: $20

**********

New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

**********

New York City Audubon Society
Saturday, March 24, 2018, 10am – 5pm
Winter Birds of Sandy Hook, NJ
Guide: Joe Giunta, Happy Warblers LLC
Sandy Hook, a spectacular barrier island at the northernmost point of the New Jersey coast, hosts a variety of species including Arctic-bound migrants and harbor seals that lie on the beach to warm up in the sun. Other possible sightings include loons, sea ducks, snow buntings, and horned larks. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $103 (72)
Click here to register

Saturday, March 24, 2018, 5:00pm – 9:30pm
The Sky-Dance of the Woodcock
Guide: Gabriel Willow
The American Woodcock is a remarkable bird. It is in the sandpiper family but lives in woodlands, often far from beaches. The male performs an incredible crepuscular aerial display and song early in the spring, soon after the snow melts in the northern U.S. We’ll look for it (and bats, owls, and other critters) at Floyd Bennett Field. Bring a headlamp or flashlight and a snack. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $92 (64) per trip
Click here to register

**********

North Shore Audubon
Saturday, March 24, 9:30am – 12:00pm
Alley Pond Environmental Center
Leader: Trudy - home (718) 224-8432‬ mobile (347) 251-5841‬

Please inform walk leader that you are attending.
See "Walk Locations" for directions.
Meet in westernmost parking lot.
Wear water-resistant footwear, bring binoculars and drinking water. Wear long pants and socks so you do not touch poison ivy.

**********

South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, March 25, 2018
Jones Beach West End 2
From the Southern State Parkway, exit onto the Meadowbrook State Parkway south. After entering Jones Beach State Park, exit right (west) into the West End. Continue west to West End 2 parking lot; we meet in the northeast corner of the lot.

From the Wantagh State Parkway, travel south. Upon entering Jones Beach State Park, exit at Bay Drive and continue west to West End 2 parking lot; we meet in the northeast corner of the lot.
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


**********

Young Birders Club
Saturday March 24, 2018
Wallkill River National Wildlife Refuge / Black Dirt Region (Orange County)
Trip Leader: Garret Van Gelder
This trip will be led by our very own Garret Van Gelder, who tells us this is one of his favorite birding destinations.

The Wallkill River NWR was established in 1990 and encompasses 5100 acres. Most of the refuge is located in Sussex, New Jersey but the northern part, Liberty Marsh, is in Orange County, New York.

The 2.75 mile Liberty Loop (most of which is in NJ) links with the Appalachian Trail and circles wetlands and mudflats. The marsh attracts migrating shorebirds, waterfowl and raptors. The area is also known for its Black Dirt which is rich in organic matter. Grassland birds, shorebirds and geese feed from the furrows and ditches.

More than 225 bird species have been observed on the refuge throughout the years. It offers excellent viewing opportunities for birds and a variety of wildlife.

Be prepared -- trails may be muddy at this time of year.

New Trip Registration Form due by FRIDAY 3/16/18. If you have not yet submitted a 2018 medical form (page 2 of the trip registration form) please submit it with your registration form.
...Read more

Saturday, March 17, 2018

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, March 16, 2018:

- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Mar. 16, 2018
* NYNY1803.16

- Birds mentioned
PINK-FOOTED GOOSE+
MEW GULL+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE
EURASIAN WIGEON
RED-NECKED GREBE
EARED GREBE
Great Egret
American Woodcock
BLACK-HEADED GULL
ICELAND GULL
Snowy Owl
Eastern Phoebe
Tree Swallow
Pine Warbler
Rusty Blackbird

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, March 16th 2018 at 8pm. The highlights of today's tape are MEW GULL, BLACK-HEADED GULL, ICELAND GULL, PINK-FOOTED GOOSE, GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE, EURASIAN WIGEON, EARED GREBE, RED-NECKED GREBE and more.

As we work our way through the March doldrums, when the anticipation accompanying seasonal change is generally poorly rewarded initially, a few nice rarities hanging around have at least kept things interesting.

Just today a MEW GULL, perhaps one that had also been seen earlier in the season in Brooklyn, was spotted in the gull flock that gathers around the boat basin at Floyd Bennett Field. Scanning through Ring-billed Gull gatherings does pay off. Speaking of that the immature BLACK-HEADED GULL appeared on Prospect Park Lake at least to last Saturday and Monday. An ICELAND GULL was also in Brooklyn Saturday seen at Bush Terminal Piers Park.

The PINK-FOOTED GOOSE out in Montauk was still present Sunday on the pastures at Deep Hollow Ranch on the south side of Route 27. Also hanging on through today is the GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE roosting on Tung Ting Pond in Centerport. The EURASIAN WIGEON was still at Marine Park Salt Marsh Nature Center in Brooklyn today. The EARED GREBE wintering in Fire Island Inlet was still around on Monday at its frequent location around the piers west of the fisherman's parking lot on Oak Beach Road. This probably now is appropriate to note that Horned Grebes still lingering in our area are currently molting into breeding plumage and so now should be separated from EARED GREBES more by structural than plumage differences. The RED-NECKED GREBE at the Restoration Pond in Alley Pond Park in Queens was still there yesterday and another was around the West Marina in Long Beach last weekend.

To keep things interesting a small number of SNOWY OWLS also remain in the area.

Returning to other recent arrivals a couple of GREAT EGRETS appeared Sunday in the Jamaica Bay region. The recent weather pattern has stalled some of the inbound migration with some of the EASTERN PHOEBES, TREE SWALLOWS and PINE WARBLERS plus the AMERICAN WOODCOCK that have ventured north have surely found recent conditions very difficult. RUSTY BLACKBIRDS have been present at various fresh water swampy sites including Prospect and Alley Pond Parks and even the Bronx Zoo.

To phone in reports on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Treehugger Tuesday

From Popular Science online:

This 'acoustic lighthouse' could keep birds from killing themselves on wind turbines
Clean energy doesn't have to be deadly.
By Jeremy Deaton Nexus Media 5 hours ago

Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke recently falsely claimed that wind turbines kill 750,000 birds each year. In actuality, wind turbines kill a little more than 350,000 birds annually — which is far fewer than cars, house cats, or plate-glass windows put to death. What’s the biggest threat to our flying friends? According to the Audubon Society, it’s climate change.

Of course, to draw down heat-trapping carbon pollution, we need to ramp up wind power by an order of magnitude, which will put a lot more birds in danger. Fortunately, it seems scientists have found a fix. Researchers at the College of William and Mary have built an innovative device that alerts birds in danger of crashing into a wind turbine.

“There’s a lot of interest in developing near-shore or offshore wind energy. Putting large, rotating structures that look like mincemeat-makers in the sky isn’t going to be good for the birds,” said biologist John Swaddle, at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Swaddle wants to equip turbines with his new invention, the Acoustic Lighthouse, which warns bird to look up before it’s too late.

Birds, which have eyes on the sides of their heads, look down and to the side when horizontal. That means that, when flying, their eyes are on the ground, which helps them navigate. For most of their evolutionary history, this didn’t pose a problem. Soaring several hundred feet above the ground, birds were unlikely to run into a tree.

Today, however, human-made structures like skyscrapers, cell phone towers, and wind turbines reach into the sky, creating unseen obstacles for birds in flight. When a downward-looking bird runs headfirst into a wind turbine, it dies almost instantly.

“That risk is not evenly spread across the world. It’s concentrated in certain areas, because wind is concentrated in certain areas,” Swaddle said. “That’s where the wind turbines are — and that’s where bird movement is sometimes concentrated, especially during migration.”

The Acoustic Lighthouse generates a high-pitched sound that prompts birds to slow down. Birds hit the brakes by pointing their tail feathers down, which makes their body shift upright, causing them look ahead instead of at the ground. “All that’s missing is the brake-screeching sound,” Swaddle said.

If a birds looks up and sees a wind turbine, it will change course and fly around the obstacle. If it doesn’t look up until the last second, simply making its body vertical might spare it from a fatal brain injury. “It’s a bit like someone texting while they’re driving,” he added. “If you honk your horn at them, they’ll look up.”

Swaddle, along with former William and Mary graduate student Nicole Ingrassia, tested the technology with captive zebra finches. The birds flew down a long corridor toward a mesh net. The Acoustic Lighthouse got some birds to look up in time to avoid the net, and it prompted many others to slow down substantially. The researchers published their findings in the journal Integrative and Comparative Biology.

Swaddle is now looking to scale up his invention. “If you want to apply this to a building or to a wind turbine, that kind of free-flying situation, you’d project the sound field 50 or maybe 100 meters in front,” he said. “So when a bird enters that zone, it gets plenty of warning.” He explained that, because the speaker is directional, and it would be mounted atop a very tall wind turbine, people on the ground would be oblivious to any sound.

The Acoustic Lighthouse could resolve a central conflict around wind energy. Some conservationists oppose wind energy because turbines post a threat to birds. By equipping turbines with a warning system, power utilities might assuage the concerns of bird lovers.

“There’s been some situations in which a single eagle has hit a wind turbine and the penalties associated with that have shut down that wind farm for weeks on end,” Swaddle said. “We’re not going to stop using electricity, and so we need to find ways to live with wildlife more sustainably.”

Jeremy Deaton writes for Nexus Media, a syndicated newswire covering climate, energy, policy, art and culture. You can follow him @deaton_jeremy.
...Read more

Monday, March 12, 2018

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, March 17, 2018 to Sunday, March 18, 2018:

Audubon Center in Prospect Park
Saturday, March 17, 12pm – 1pm
Introduction to Birdwatching
Join Prospect Park Alliance for a birdwatching walk and learn about Prospect magnificent array of birds and how to identify them!

**********

Bedford Audubon Society
March 17, 2018, 8:30am - 2:00pm
Wallkill National Wildlife Refuge/Black Dirt Region
Leader: Naturalist Tait Johansson
Join Tait and the group in search of exciting spring migrants including Rusty Blackbird and Wood Duck, and large flocks of waterfowl that often contain hundreds of Northern Pintail and Green-winged Teal. Possible stop at Shawangunk Grasslands on the way back for Rough-legged Hawks and Eastern Meadowlark, among others. Depart Bylane 7am.
Cost: Free
Level of difficulty: Easy to moderate
Please register with Susan Fisher at info@bedfordaudubon.org or 914-302-9713
See more details

**********

Brooklyn Bird Club
Saturday, March 17, 2018
Ridgewood Reservoir to the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Leader Steve Nanz
Focus: early spring passerines, ducks, marsh species, raptors
Car Fee: $12.00
Registrar: Heidi Steiner-Nanz email heidi.steiner.bklyn@gmail.com or call before 8 pm 718-369-2116
Registration Period: March 10th – March 15th
Please review our general trip information and guidelines on this page.

**********

Feminist Bird Club
Saturday, March 17, 2018
Staten Island Hotspots
Check the website for more details

**********

Gateway National Recreation Area
Sunday, March 18, 2018, 10:00am to 11:30am
Osprey Watch Guided Walk
Location: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Learn all about the amazing osprey on this guided walk of the West Pond Trail.
View Details

**********

New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

**********

New York City Audubon Society
Sunday, March 18, 2018, 10am – 12pm
Audubon Mural Project Tour
Guide: Leigh Hallingby
The Audubon Mural Project is an exciting effort to create murals of over 300 birds in the northern Manhattan neighborhoods of Hamilton Heights and Washington Heights. As all the birds painted are threatened by climate change, the project is designed not only to help us appreciate the beauty of the birds, but also make us aware of the challenges they face. In addition to seeing about 30 murals, we will visit John James Audubon's impressive gravesite in the Trinity Church cemetery. Participants are encouraged to bring binoculars. Limited to 25. $30 (20)
Click here to register

**********

North Shore Audubon
Saturday, March 17, 2018, 9:30am – 12:00pm
Massapequa Preserve
Leader: Ralph - (516) 785-3375

Please inform walk leader that you are attending.
See "Walk Locations" for directions.
Meet in westernmost parking lot.
Wear water-resistant footwear, bring binoculars and drinking water. Wear long pants and socks so you do not touch poison ivy.

**********

South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, March 18, 2018
Point Lookout Town Park (and Lido Preserve afterwards)
From the Southern State Parkway, exit onto the Meadowbrook State Parkway south. Exit from the Meadowbrook at Loop Parkway (just before the Jones Beach toll booths) toward Point Lookout. The Loop Parkway ends west of Point Lookout at Lido Boulevard. Continue straight across Lido Boulevard into Point Lookout Park. Travel past the ticket booths and curve left into the very large parking lot on the south side of the park. Park in the southeast corner, closest to the private homes of the village of Point Lookout and the beach. We will walk east along the beach toward Jones Inlet. After returning to the parking lot, we will drive west on Lido Boulevard to Lido Beach Passive Nature Preserve on the north side of Lido Boulevard to walk through the bay marsh.
Directions to Point Lookout Park via Google Maps | Directions to Lido Beach Passive Nature Preserve via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


**********

Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, March 17, 2018
Wildlife Viewing: Woodpeckers at 200 Nevada Avenue (in High Rock Park), Staten Island
1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.
New York City is home to an amazing abundance of wildlife. Our Urban Park Rangers will guide you to the best wildlife viewing spots in the urban jungle.
Free!
...Read more

Tuesday, March 06, 2018

Treehugger Tuesday

From Mother Nature Network:

Spring is springing earlier than it did a decade ago
Noel Kirkpatrick
March 7, 2018

Most people can't wait for spring to arrive. It means flowers and warmer weather, all welcome changes from the doldrums of winters.

Now we know that spring is arriving sooner in the Northern Hemisphere than it has in the past, thanks to a study published in Scientific Reports. And the further north you go, the sooner spring will chase away winter.

For example, Los Angeles may experience spring only a day earlier than it did 10 years ago, but in Seattle or Chicago, spring will arrive four days earlier. If you live in the Arctic, congratulations! Spring could arrive 16 days earlier than it used to.

To determine how springtime is starting earlier, researchers looked at temperature records and 743 earlier studies from across 86 years about various biological indicators of spring, including birds migrating, plants blooming and amphibians sounding their mating calls to see if they were occurring earlier. The result demonstrated that not only is spring making itself known sooner, but it's warmer, too. Since 1989, in areas north of the 59th parallel north, temperatures have steadily increased. This warming in turn has likely sped up those biological indicators of spring.

Before you break out in a happy springtime gig, spring arriving sooner isn't all it's cracked up to be. The livelihood of migratory birds, for instance, may be cause for concern.

"Whatever cues they're relying on to move northward for spring might not be reliable predictors of food availability once they get there if the onset of spring at these higher latitudes is amplified by future warming," Eric Post, a fellow of the John Muir Institute and polar ecologist in the University California Davis Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology, said in a statement about the study. "The springtime emergence of the plants and insects they'll eat when they arrive is happening faster than the changes at the lower latitudes those birds are departing from."

Animals that rely on Arctic sea ice, like walruses and polar bear, probably aren't crazy about things warming up sooner, either, because it impacts their ability to hunt.

The ramifications of these trends aren't currently known, but spring's early arrival could disrupt the delicate balance of various ecosystems — not to mention how soon you'll need to buy allergy medicine.
...Read more

Monday, March 05, 2018

Upcoming Birding & Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, March 10, 2018 to Sunday, March 11, 2018:

Audubon Center in Prospect Park
Saturday, March 10, 12pm – 1pm
Introduction to Birdwatching
Join Prospect Park Alliance for a birdwatching walk and learn about Prospect magnificent array of birds and how to identify them!

**********

Brooklyn Bird Club
Sunday, March 11, 2018
Green-Wood Cemetery
Meet 8:00am at main gate entrance 25th Street and 5th Ave.
No registration necessary.
Leader: Matthew Wills
Focus: late winter passerines, woodpeckers, raptors
Nearest Subway: “R” train to 25th Street.
Please review our general trip information and guidelines on this page.

**********

Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, March 11, 2018
Birding in Peace
Just because it’s winter, doesn’t mean that there aren’t interesting birds to discover in Green-Wood. For some bird species that migrate south after the breeding season, Brooklyn is their Miami during the cold months. Spend the early morning exploring the cemetery, looking for overwintering waterfowl, nuthatches, woodpeckers, sparrows, finches and any half-hardy birds that decided to stick around. By February we’ll see some of the early north-bound birds beginning to trickle back into the area.

$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members

Click here for our inclement weather policy.


**********

Hudson River Audubon Society
Saturday, March 10, 2018
Evening Timberdoodle Walk
Meet: 6:00pm Croton Point Park Ball Field
Look for displaying American Woodcocks
http://hras.org/wtobird/croton.html

**********

Huntington-Oyster Bay Audubon Society
Sunday, March 11, 2018, 9:00am
Target Rock National Wildlife Refuge
All day trip. Winter waterfowl abound including scoters, eiders, loons, gannets, and numerous pond ducks.
Registration: 631-885-1881

Directions: Take West Neck Rd north out of Huntington, following it along Lloyd Neck and past Caumsett all the way to the end, and watch for the big brown wildlife refuge sign.

**********

New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

**********

New York City Audubon Society
Sunday, March 11, 2018, 9am – 4pm
Winter Birds of Barnegat, NJ
Guide: Joe Giunta, Happy Warblers LLC
Explore Barnegat Inlet’s expansive beach to view the winter birds that gather where land, bay, and sea meet. Search for harlequin ducks, horned larks, Lapland longspurs, snow buntings, as well as snowy and short-eared owls. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $115 (80)
Click here to register

Sunday, March 11, 2018, 9:30am – 11:30am
Winter Birding Along the Hudson: Wave Hill
Guide: Gabriel Willow with Wave Hill
Meet at the Perkins Visitor Center. The Hudson River valley hosts an impressive diversity of bird species, even during the winter months. Come explore the beautiful gardens and woodlands of Wave Hill and observe the hardy birds that spend the winter in this urban oasis. Walks run rain or shine. Ages 10 and up welcome with an adult. See www.wavehill.org for admission rates. NYC Audubon members enjoy two-for-one admission

**********

North Shore Audubon
Saturday, March 10, 2018, 9:30am – 12:00pm
Stehli Beach
Leader: Lindy - home (516) 628-1315 mobile (516) 343-4646‬

Please inform walk leader that you are attending.
See "Walk Locations" for directions.
Meet in westernmost parking lot.
Wear water-resistant footwear, bring binoculars and drinking water. Wear long pants and socks so you do not touch poison ivy.

**********

Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Sunday, March 11, 2018, 6:30pm – 8:00pm
Owl Prowl in the Greenbelt at High Rock Park
Join with Cliff Hagen as he explores the deep woods of Staten Island in search of our nocturnal neighbors. Walk the quiet woods and listen for the whistles and whines of screech owls, the deep hoots of great horned owls and other noises of the night.
Participants will meet at the top of Nevada Avenue.
For more information call Cliff Hagen at 718-313-8591 or email him at chagen72@gmail.com.

**********

Queens County Bird Club
Sunday, March 11, 2018
Cupsogue Seal Walk
Leader(s): Nancy Tognan and Mike Zito (917) 753-3146
Where: Cupsogue Beach County Park, 906 Dune Rd, Westhampton Beach, NY 11978, (map)

**********

South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, March 11, 2018
Alley Pond Park
Take the Long Island Expressway west to Exit 29 (Springfield Blvd.). Turn left onto Springfield Blvd. south. Go five blocks and turn left onto 76th Ave. Quickly turn left into the 76th Ave. parking lot. We will meet at the far end of the lot. For a street map that shows the parking lot (and the entire neighborhood), go to www.nycgovparks.org/parks/alleypondpark/map (Google Maps labels it “Aarya park Parking lot"). For online directions, enter "76th Ave 11364" as the location.
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


**********

Urban Park Rangers
Sunday, March 11, 2018
Spring Birding at Perkins Visitors Center (in Wave Hill), Bronx
9:30 a.m.–11:00 a.m.
Explore the gardens and woodlands with naturalist Gabriel Willow on a quest to spot both resident and rare birds.
Free!
...Read more

Exploring urban nature, birds, birdwatching, birding, hummingbirds, butterflies, dragonflies, bees, hawks, raptors, wildflowers, trees, mushrooms, environment, binoculars, spotting scope