Check out City Birder Tours, and Green-Wood sponsored tours on their calendar pages here.
Celebrate your inner nerd with my new t-shirt design! Available on my Spreadshirt shop in multiple colors and products.

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Treehugger Tuesday

From the website Earther:

Switching to Renewables May Spur Trillions Dollars Worth of Benefits in US
Yessenia Funes
October 29, 2019

The costs of installing renewable energy are far outweighed by the health benefits they would unlock, according to a new study. Those benefits could add up to upwards of $2.2 trillion.

Published in the journal Environmental Research Letters on Tuesday, the study looks at how transitioning away from fossil fuels—which spew nasty junk such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxides, and particulate matter in addition to carbon pollution—would benefit the economy by reducing the health burdens communities face due to this dirty energy. The authors analyzed the current use of coal, oil, and gas by region while examining what type of renewable would produce the best benefits there.

The total benefits, which include both climate and health, ranged from $1.7 million to $2.2 trillion depending on the region. The range is so wide because some regions saw dramatically higher benefits as they depend on much dirtier forms of energy. There are also, however, different values associated with benefits that can vary depending on how much we expect this reduction in pollution to benefit people.

The model built by the authors—who hail from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Carnegie Mellon—uses other already-existing models to simulate where renewable energy infrastructure would displace power plants and their accompanying emissions in 10 regions of the U.S. The researchers also estimate the climate benefits from this transition by measuring the reduction in carbon emissions using the social cost of carbon, a metric which looks at climate change impacts such as displacement and the spread of infectious disease and puts a price on them.

“When you include health, the cost-effectiveness equation completely changes,” lead author Jonathan Buonocore, a research associate at Harvard, told Earther. “In most areas of the country, if health is included, deploying renewable energy ends up being more cost-effective than installing carbon capture on a coal plant.”

The benefits vary by region. For example, installing 100 megawatts of wind in California could result in $4.2 million in benefits. That’s because installing rooftop solar, utility solar, and wind turbines would decrease the state’s gas production, as well as its emissions from burning biomass. However, California saw among the lowest benefits for its renewables—between $1.7 million and $4.2 million a year. That’s because other parts of the U.S. rely on energy that’s much dirty.

Take a look at regions in the eastern U.S., for instance. Due to the continuing reliance of coal in eastern regions, the health benefits were estimated to be the highest there, especially around the Great Lakes. Coal emits the most pollution, so removing it adds some of the best health benefits for communities.

And this study is likely a serious underestimate. While the authors estimate the reduced risk of dying due to the decreased pollution, they don’t include any data on the reduction to emergency room visits or other health benefits that would result from such a shift. We already know climate change is taking a toll and costing billions. They also don’t conduct any life cycle assessments for the energy infrastructure, which may add increased benefits as this would include the extraction of fossil fuels. Another big missing source of benefits is tied to methane leakage from gas infrastructure. That alone can increase benefits by 36 percent, according to the study.

As the world comes to terms with the work required to save the planet and protect public health in light of the climate crisis, leaders need to pay special attention to energy. This study shows that the cost of energy, in particular, needs some re-assessing. If health costs and benefits were considered as part of the actual price of energy, renewables could compete with fossil fuels (even without doing that, they already are in many places). Then, perhaps, officials would stop complaining about the economics of climate change and just hurry up and fix this mess.
...Read more

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming birding and nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, November 2, 2019 to Sunday, November 3, 2019:

Bedford Audubon Society
August 25, 2019 through November 25, 2019, 9:00am-5:00pm
Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch
Arthur Butler Sanctuary, Bedford, NY
Spectacular flocks of Broad-winged Hawks pass through our area in mid-September, but Accipiters such as Sharp-shinned + Cooper’s Hawks provide the most consistent flight throughout the fall hawk-watching season.

Join us for Science in Action: Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch to experience the miracle of raptor migration. Our data is combined with other Hawkwatch sites to create population and migration analyses that help us better protect raptors and their habitats.

Registration not necessary.
See more details

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Brooklyn Bird Club
Saturday, November 2, 2019, 7:15am - 12:00pm
Fall Birding in Prospect Park
Leader: Ed Crowne
Focus: late songbirds, typical late fall migrants; the beginning of winter migratory species, potential rarity
Meet 7:15 am at Bartel Pritchard park entrance, no registration required.
Please review our trip guidelines here: http://brooklynbirdclub.org/information-registration

Saturday, November 2, 2019, 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Prospect Park: Birdwatching for Beginners
Leader: Cyrus Baty
Birdwatching for Beginners meets at the Prospect Park Audubon Center at The Boathouse at 12 noon. Bring binoculars if you have them; otherwise, binoculars are available for loan.

Sunday, November 3, 2019, 8:00am - 11:00am
Prospect Park First Sunday Walk
Meets at the Prospect Park Audubon Center at The Boathouse, the first Sunday of every month except July and August. Leaders are members of the Brooklyn Bird Club.
Bring binoculars.
Note: Meets at 8 a.m. except in the winter months of December, January, and February when the walk starts at 10 a.m.

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Gateway National Park
Saturday, November 2, 2019, 5:00pm — 6:30 pm
Jr. Ranger Evening Owl Prowl
View Details

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Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, November 3, 2019, 6:30am - 8:00am
Birding in Peace
Before our gates open to the general public, birding expert Rob Jett leads these peaceful Sunday morning walking tours to discover the birds that make Green-Wood their home – at least temporarily.

By September, offspring of these nesting birds will be on their own. Returning warblers will be in their less flamboyant fall plumage. Large numbers of blackbirds, flycatchers, sparrows, vireos, and swallows will also be passing through. By October, waterfowl are returning, and we’ll look for raptors heading south. November will bring back our overwintering feathered denizens from the north.

All walks are at a slow pace on easy to moderate terrain, but proper, close toed footwear is suggested.
$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members
Click here for our inclement weather policy.


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Linnaean Society of New York
Sunday, November 3, 2019
State Line Hawk Watch, New Jersey
Leader: Pieter Prall
Registrar: Sandra Maury — sandramaury39@gmail.com or 212-874-4881
Registration opens: Monday, October 21
Ride: $15

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New York City Audubon
Saturday, November 2, 2019, 8am – 3pm
Beginning Birding Field Trip
Classes: Wednesdays, October 16-30, 6:30-8:30pm
Trips: Saturdays, October 26, 8-11am, and November 2, 8am-3pm
Instructor: Tod Winston
Learn the keys to identifying the spectacular variety of birds that migrate southwards through New York City every fall. Even if you've never picked up a pair of binoculars, you’ll soon be identifying warblers, thrushes, waterbirds, and more—both by sight and by ear. Three fun and educational in-class sessions and two field trips to Central Park and Jamaica Bay (transport to Jamaica Bay included). Limited to 12. $179 (125)
Click here to register

Saturday, November 2, 2019, 9am – 3pm
Ducks, Raptors and More at Pelham Bay Park
Guide: Gabriel Willow
Come explore the lovely coves and rocky outcroppings of Pelham Bay Park as we look for wintering ducks, migrating raptors, and more. Pelham Bay Park's combination of open water, saltmarsh, rocky shore, both young- and old-growth forest, rare coastal tall grass meadows, and patches of dry and wet oak savanna are not just unique within the city, but also on this continent. Bring lunch and water. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $97 (68)
Click here to register

Saturday, November 2, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Van Cortlandt Park Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 7-November 23, 9-10:30am
Guides: NYC Audubon with the Van Cortlandt Park Alliance
Meet at the southeast corner of the Mosholu Avenue park entrance. The history of birding and Van Cortlandt Park are inseparable. Influential birders such as Roger Tory Peterson and Allan D. Cruickshank got their starts on Van Cortlandt’s ecologically diverse grounds. These walks celebrate the tradition set forth by these great ornithologists. Participants will look for various species of residents and migrants and discuss a wide range of avian topics. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Sunday, November 3, 2019, 9:30am – 10:30am
Queens Botanical Garden Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 14 and October 26,
Sundays, October 6, October 20, and November 3, 9:30-10:30am
Guide: Corey Finger with Queens Botanical Garden
Explore Queens Botanical Garden in search of migrant songbirds and learn about the valuable resources that the Garden offers birds and other wildlife. Binoculars available. Register for one date or the whole series of five walks (walk-ins welcome). Email info@queensbotanical.org or visit www.queensbotanical.org/calendar to register. Limited to 25 per walk. Free (with Garden admission)

Sunday, November 3, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Pelham Bay Park Bird Walks
Sundays, September 8-December 8, 9-10:30am
Guide: NYC Audubon with Pelham Bay Park
September 8: Meets at Rodman’s Neck Parking Lot
September 15-December 8: Meet at Orchard Beach Parking Lot
Join us to explore some of the best birding NYC has to offer. Come discover Pelham Bay Park's diverse habitat that attracts a variety of fall migrants. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

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North Shore Audubon Society
Saturday, November 2, 2019, 9:30am – 12:00pm
Upper Francis Pond - Shelly (map)
After Upper Francis, we will drive to Bailey Arboretum at 194 Bayville Rd, Locust Valley, NY.

Please inform walk leader that you are attending.
See "Walk Locations" for directions.
Wear water-resistant footwear, bring binoculars and drinking water. Wear long pants and socks so you do not touch poison ivy.


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Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Sunday, November 3, 2019, 9:15pm-3:15pm
The Richard Buegler Fall 10-Mile Greenbelt Walk
Rockland Avenue and Brielle Avenue, Staten Island
The Richard Buegler Fall 10-Mile Greenbelt Walk—The Fall 10-miler begins at the Greenbelt Nature Center, winds its way through LaTourette Park before returning to the Nature Center. Participants will explore the heart of Staten Island while enjoying an invigorating loop hike in the Greenbelt with Protectors. An autumnal walk through the colorful woodlands of the Greenbelt with Protectors allows inquisitive visitors to experience local wildlife while gaining knowledge of the natural world. We will meet in the Nature Center parking lot at the corner of Rockland and Brielle Avenues.
For more information call Dominick Durso at (917) 478-7607.

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Queens County Bird Club
Saturday, November 2, 2019, 8:00am – 3:00pm
South Shore Potpourri
Leader: Ian Resnick (917) 626-9562
Where: 2352 Windsor Rd, Baldwin, NY 11510 (map)
Explore various duck ponds of the South Shore, starting with Lofts Pond in Baldwin - see map for this location - and heading east to Milburn Creek, Cow Meadow, Cammanns Pond, Mill Pond Park Bellmore, and any other nearby locations that have reported interesting sightings on that day. Meet at the southwest corner of Loft's Pond Park. Park on-street near the map address.
Lunch break: We usually stop at a pizzeria or pitaria for lunch.

Non members are welcome on our trips and we would appreciate a nominal $5 (or more!) voluntary donation for non-member participation. We prefer if you offer instead of being asked.
All persons (member or not) are required to offer contribution if they get a ride with another.
All persons are requested to Notify the leader at least 2 days in advance if they want to go on a trip.
Be on time. We depart promptly.


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South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, November 3, 2019
Massapequa Preserve
From Sunrise Highway, turn north onto Broadway, Massapequa. Travel under the Long Island Rail Road overpass, then make the first right onto Veterans Boulevard (headed east). Go past the Massapequa train station and into the parking lot at the east end of the station. The preserve is directly east of the parking lot.
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


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Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, November 2, 2019
The New York City Naturalist Club: Fall Migration at Isham Street and Seaman Avenue (in Inwood Hill Park), Manhattan
10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
Our Urban Park Rangers will guide you to the best wildlife viewing spots in the urban jungle.
Free!

Ecosystem Explorers: Critters of the Night at Comfort station (in Willowbrook Park), Staten Island
6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Be an explorer with the Urban Park Rangers as we venture into habitats that exist in New York City parks!
Free!

Sunday, November 3, 2019
Audubon Bird Walk at Queens Botanical Garden, Queens
9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
Register for one or all five free nature walks in this special series with NYC Audubon! Spot and identify creatures of flight and learn how QBG provides important resources for birds.
Free!

Queens Park of the Month: Kissena Corridor Park at 56th Road and 146th Street (in Kissena Corridor Park), Queens
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
The Queens Park of the Month series features some highlights of some local favorite parks.
Free!
...Read more

Saturday, October 26, 2019

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, October 25, 2019:

-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Oct. 25, 2019
* NYNY1910.25

- Birds Mentioned
SAY’S PHOEBE+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

EURASIAN WIGEON
HARLEQUIN DUCK
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
BROWN PELICAN
American Bittern
Virginia Rail
AMERICAN AVOCET
American Oystercatcher
“Western” Willet
HUDSONIAN GODWIT
MARBLED GODWIT
Red Knot
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
American Woodcock
Parasitic Jaeger
Caspian Tern
Royal Tern
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
American Pipit
YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW
Vesper Sparrow
LARK SPARROW
Grasshopper Sparrow
Nelson’s Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Black-and-white Warbler
Tennessee Warbler
Orange-crowned Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Mourning Warbler
Cape May Warbler
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
BLUE GROSBEAK
DICKCISSEL

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, October 25, 2019 at 9:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are both BROWN and AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS, a good Saturday flight day, including a report of a SAY’S PHOEBE, EURASIAN WIGEON and HARLEQUIN DUCK, AMERICAN AVOCET, MARBLED and HUDSONIAN GODWITS, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER, LARK and CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS, YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, DICKCISSEL, BLUE GROSBEAK and much more.

Both PELICANS seen locally again this week featured a BROWN PELICAN photographed last Saturday on the west jetty at the entrance to Montauk Harbor and an AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN visiting the East Pond at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge from Monday through today, appearing near the Raunt today off the Big John’s Pond overlook after spending most of the week on the pond’s north end.

A strong coastal flight last Saturday, dominated by YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS, did produce good numbers of incoming sparrows and a variety of mostly departing species plus an intriguing report of a fly-by flycatcher at Jones Beach West End that was thought by the observer to be a SAY’S PHOEBE – unfortunately, rather than lingering to be photographed, the bird apparently just continued west.

As waterfowl numbers and variety continue to build, a drake HARLEQUIN DUCK appeared Monday out at Orient Point and a EURASIAN WIGEON was still being seen on Jamaica Bay’s East Pond at least to Tuesday. Also on the East Pond, 2 AMERICAN AVOCETS were present today, with 1 there most of the week. Other shorebirds included 5 LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS on the East Pond and, out in Jamaica Bay, an HUDSONIAN GODWIT photographed as it flew by south of the West Pond, both on Sunday.

Today on Staten Island 3 AMERICAN AVOCETS were spotted later in the afternoon at Miller Field.

Four MARBLED GODWITS were still hanging out with over 200 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS and other shorebirds at Jones Beach West End on the Coast Guard island yesterday, and 7 LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS were counted today at their roost on Santapogue Creek in West Babylon. A “WESTERN” WILLET, a RED KNOT and a SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER were among the shorebirds on the Point Lookout wharf at the West Marina boat basin Sunday.

Two CASPIAN TERNS were still at Jones Beach West End last weekend, while the continuing ROYAL TERNS featured 42 on the beach at Jones Beach Field 6 last Sunday; these were part of a large gathering of gulls and terns both off Field 6 and off Robert Moses State Park on Sunday, providing a nice opportunity for marauding PARASITIC JAEGERS, with at least 15 noted off Moses Park and at least 7 off Jones Field 6.

Single RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were spotted at Floyd Bennet Field Saturday and in Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn Wednesday.

An adult LARK SPARROW at Nickerson Beach Sunday was followed by 1 in Central Park’s north end on Tuesday and Wednesday, and a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was east of the entrance booth to Jones Beach West End Saturday.

A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was seen in Greenwood Cemetery Saturday and Thursday, and a SALTMARSH SPARROW in Manhattan’s Union Square Park today was joined by a MOURNING WARBLER.

A DICKCISSEL was at Jones Beach West End Saturday, while a BLUE GROSBEAK visited Greenwood Cemetery Sunday to Wednesday.

A YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT at Central Park’s north end Sunday followed 1 at Montauk Point last Saturday.

Other notable migrants during the week included YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, VIRGINIA RAIL, AMERICAN WOODCOCK, AMERICAN BITTERN, AMERICAN PIPIT, VESPER SPARROW, with 2 in Prospect Park to today, NELSON’S SPARROW, BOBOLINK and EASTERN MEADOWLARK.

Single ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS were noted Saturday on Long Island at Robert Moses State Park and on the North Fork.

A decent variety of late WARBLERS this week did include1 or more each of OVENBIRD, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, BLACK-AND-WHITE, TENNESSEE, NASHVILLE, NORTHERN PARULA, BLACK-THROATEDS BLUE and GREEN, CAPE MAY, CHESTNUT-SIDED, PRAIRIE and others.

To phone in reports please call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Treehugger Tuesday

From the website Earther:

The Potential of Green Urban Planning for Mental Health
by Robin George Andrews
Friday 10:50AM

There is no single solution to the world-wide epidemic of poor mental health; addressing its root causes—like poverty-triggered stress and social isolation—and choosing effective treatment for sufferers remains paramount. One way to potentially partly buffer against the effects of poor mental health is through contact with nature, including the green spaces within metropolises.

This is an emerging area of research with plenty of unanswered questions attached, but there is a not-insignificant number of studies pointing to this being a measurable, important effect.

“Green space is an agent of public health, one that can build and sustain mental wellbeing,” Jenny Roe, an environmental psychologist at the University of Virginia, told Earther.

That’s why she’s part of a team that wants to not just quantify the effect that natural spaces have on mental health, but to also frame it in a way that forms part of designs for cities.

Neighborhood architects, engineers, and policymakers look at all kinds of factors and needs when building a city, including transportation links, housing, aesthetics, amenities, and so forth. Natural spaces are also considered, for their aesthetic, recreational, and ecological benefits. A study published in July in Science Advances outlines a model that will let policymakers see nature’s impacts on psychological wellbeing in much the same way.

The relationship between nature, mental health, and general psychological well being is still tenuous but a subject of much research, and for now, the framework designed to encapsulate these connections is merely a concept. But if the benefits of green spaces on mental health become clearer over time, then this framework certainly has potential.

“Any work that can help to better inform the people who are really designing the cities of the future is really welcome,” Russell Galt, the Director of the Urban Alliance, told Earther...

Read the entire article here.

Monday, October 21, 2019

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming birding and nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, October 26, 2019 to Sunday, October 27, 2019:

Bedford Audubon Society
August 25, 2019 through November 25, 2019, 9:00am-5:00pm
Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch
Arthur Butler Sanctuary, Bedford, NY
Spectacular flocks of Broad-winged Hawks pass through our area in mid-September, but Accipiters such as Sharp-shinned + Cooper’s Hawks provide the most consistent flight throughout the fall hawk-watching season.

Join us for Science in Action: Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch to experience the miracle of raptor migration. Our data is combined with other Hawkwatch sites to create population and migration analyses that help us better protect raptors and their habitats.

Registration not necessary.
See more details

Saturday, October 26, 2019, 8:00am - 10:00am
John Jay Homestead
400 Jay St, Katonah, NY 10536
Come “Jay Walking” with us… you’re sure to see more than jays this fall!

In partnership with Friends of John Jay Homestead. Naturalist Tait Johansson will lead you on a Bird Walk at the beautiful John Jay Homestead in Katonah. The woods, fields and shrublands of this State Historic Site should hold many migrant landbirds on this prime date for fall migration!
Meet at the main parking lot. Cost: Free. Level of difficulty: Easy-Moderate. Please register with Susan at info@bedfordaudubon.org or 914-302-9713.
See more details

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Brooklyn Bird Club
Saturday, October 26, 2019
Hawk watching at Wildcat Ridge Wildlife Management Area
Leader: Peter Dorosh
Focus: Hawk watching diversity at a new debut location
Car Pool Fee: $25.00
Registrar Peter Dorosh Prosbird@aol.com (or backup Prosbird@gmail.com)
Registration Period: Oct 19th – Oct 24th
Note: This trip will require a 1-mile uphill hike and then birding at a stationary site. Please refer to the site description, below.
Site Profile: http://www.wcrhawkwatch.com/kiosk.html ; https://www.nynjtc.org/hike/hawk-watch-wildcat-ridge-wildlife-management-area
Please review our trip guidelines here: http://brooklynbirdclub.org/information-registration

Saturday, October 26, 2019, 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Prospect Park: Birdwatching for Beginners
Leader: Cyrus Baty
Birdwatching for Beginners meets at the Prospect Park Audubon Center at The Boathouse at 12 noon. Bring binoculars if you have them; otherwise, binoculars are available for loan.

Sunday, October 27, 2019, 9:00am - 10:00am
Fort Greene Park, North Brooklyn
Meet 9 am at the Urban Park Rangers Visitors Center https://tinyurl.com/FtGreeneVCtr
Leader: August Davidson-Onsgard AugustDavidsonOnsgard.com
Focus: Fall migration of songbirds at a historical park.
No registration necessary.
Nearest train stations: DeKalb Avenue station; exit and walk 5 blocks east on DeKalb Avenue; Also Fulton Ave A and G lines, walk north on South Portland Ave
Site references: https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/fort-greene-park ; https://tinyurl.com/FTGreeneMaylist

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Feminist Bird Club
Sunday, October 27, 2019
Governors Island

All walks follow the ABA Code of Birding Ethics

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Gateway National Park
Saturday, October 26, 2019, 10:00am — 11:00am
Birding for Beginners
View Details

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Linnaean Society of New York
Saturday, October 26, 2019
Floyd Bennett Field
Leader: Rob Jett
Registrar: Gabe Cunningham — gabecunningham@gmail.com
Registration opens: Monday, October 14 Public transportation

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Littoral Society of New York
Sunday, October 27, 2019, 10:00am - 1:00pm
Dead Horse Bay, New York’s Best Kept Secret Ecosystem
Floyd Bennett Field
Main Entrance Ranger Station
Hike the trails and shoreline at Dead Horse Bay with Gordon Lam, American Littoral Society naturalist and NYC Botanist, Zihao Wang. Explore the nature and fascinating history of this little known area, a living museum of the 1950s.  Warning: This is a hazardous area, teeming with broken glass and metal fragments. It is not an appropriate site for small children, carriages, or wheelchairs.  Sturdy, protective footwear is essential.  Having said this, we must comment that it is one of the most exciting and fascinating “beaches” in New York City.

DIRECTIONS TO D.H.B:
Subway: IRT #2 to Flatbush Ave.  Check Sunday train schedules ahead of time. Q-35 bus south to Floyd Bennett Field, last bus stop before the Gil Hodges Memorial (Marine Pkwy.) Bridge.

Car: Belt Pkwy. to Exit 11S. Take Flatbush Ave. south to the park. 

Bus: B41 to Nostrand Ave. then Q35 to the park entrance on your left. Meet the group at the parking lot near the small contact station and walk across Flatbush Ave. to D.H.B. trailhead.

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New York City Audubon
Saturday, October 26, 2019, 8am – 11am
Beginning Birding Field Trip
Classes: Wednesdays, October 16-30, 6:30-8:30pm
Trips: Saturdays, October 26, 8-11am, and November 2, 8am-3pm
Instructor: Tod Winston
Learn the keys to identifying the spectacular variety of birds that migrate southwards through New York City every fall. Even if you've never picked up a pair of binoculars, you’ll soon be identifying warblers, thrushes, waterbirds, and more—both by sight and by ear. Three fun and educational in-class sessions and two field trips to Central Park and Jamaica Bay (transport to Jamaica Bay included). Limited to 12. $179 (125)
Click here to register

Saturday, October 26, 2019, 9am – 2pm
Fall Migration on Randall's Island
Guides: Gabriel Willow, Christopher Girgenti with Randall's Island Park Alliance
Join us for a trip to Randall's Island, an under-explored location in the East River that hosts restored freshwater wetlands and saltmarsh. We'll look for fall migrants as we explore the results of recent restoration efforts. Two miles of walking and some modest climbs. Limited to 20. $36 (25)
Click here to register

Saturday, October 26, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Van Cortlandt Park Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 7-November 23, 9-10:30am
Guides: NYC Audubon with the Van Cortlandt Park Alliance
Meet at the southeast corner of the Mosholu Avenue park entrance. The history of birding and Van Cortlandt Park are inseparable. Influential birders such as Roger Tory Peterson and Allan D. Cruickshank got their starts on Van Cortlandt’s ecologically diverse grounds. These walks celebrate the tradition set forth by these great ornithologists. Participants will look for various species of residents and migrants and discuss a wide range of avian topics. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Saturday, October 26, 2019, 9:30am – 10:30am
Queens Botanical Garden Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 14 and October 26,
Sundays, October 6, October 20, and November 3, 9:30-10:30am
Guide: Corey Finger with Queens Botanical Garden
Explore Queens Botanical Garden in search of migrant songbirds and learn about the valuable resources that the Garden offers birds and other wildlife. Binoculars available. Register for one date or the whole series of five walks (walk-ins welcome). Email info@queensbotanical.org or visit www.queensbotanical.org/calendar to register. Limited to 25 per walk. Free (with Garden admission)

Sunday, October 27, 2019, 9am – 12pm
Sparrow ID Workshop Field Trip
Thursday, October 24, 7-8:30pm (class); Sunday, October 27, 9am-noon (trip)
Instructor: Gabriel Willow
Sparrows are one of the most challenging groups of birds to identify, yet beautiful and fascinating once they can be distinguished. Learn to identify those LBJs (little brown jobs) by studying behavior, field marks, and songs. Sparrow species seen in prior years include Field, Swamp, Savannah, White-crowned, and Lincoln's. Limited to 12. $65 (45)
Click here to register

Sunday, October 27, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Pelham Bay Park Bird Walks
Sundays, September 8-December 8, 9-10:30am
Guide: NYC Audubon with Pelham Bay Park
September 8: Meets at Rodman’s Neck Parking Lot
September 15-December 8: Meet at Orchard Beach Parking Lot
Join us to explore some of the best birding NYC has to offer. Come discover Pelham Bay Park's diverse habitat that attracts a variety of fall migrants. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

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North Shore Audubon Society
Saturday, October 26, 2019, 8am – 12pm
APEC
Leader: Stephane (516) 423-0947
Alley Pond Environmental Center, 22806 Northern Blvd, Little Neck, NY 11362, USA (map)

Please inform walk leader that you are attending.
See "Walk Locations" for directions.
Wear water-resistant footwear, bring binoculars and drinking water. Wear long pants and socks so you do not touch poison ivy.


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New York City WILD!
Saturday, October 26, 2019, 8:30am
Now Get Out: Bear Mountain Fall Foliage Cruise
(Extra $)

For the FULL INFORMATION ABOUT EACH WALK click HERE to take you to the Eventbrite Profile page where you will find all details (scroll down to the thumbnails) for each of the outings and how to SIGN UP !

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Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Saturday, October 26, 2019, 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Brookfield Park
575 Arthur Kill Road, Staten Island
Join Protectors of Pine Oak Woods for a natural history tour of Staten Island’s newest open space park. We will view numerous salt creeks, freshwater wetlands, grasslands and beautiful scenery; a must for hawk watching. Brookfield Park stretches along the southeastern banks of Richmond Creek and runs from Richmond Avenue to Richmondtown.
Meet in the main parking lot at 575 Arthur Kill Road, just north of Armstrong Avenue.
For more information contact Ray Matarazzo at (718) 317-7666.

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Queens County Bird Club
Saturday, Oct 26, 2019
Hawk Mountain
Leader: Bob D. (848) 468-7207
Where: Clinton Station Diner, 2 Bank St, Clinton, NJ 08809 (map)
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary is a 2.5 to 3 hour drive from eastern Queens. Contact trip leader or assistant for carpool info and other questions. The map link is to the diner, where we will have breakfast and convoy to Hawk Mountain.

Hawk Mountain is one of the top hawk watch locations in North America, certainly the premiere Fall hawk watch in the Northeast. Located on the Kittatiny Ridge west of the Delaware Water Gap, Hawk Mountain Sanctuary protects 2,600 acres of the ridge and provides excellent viewing of migrating hawks as well as fall passerines.

Late October produces peak numbers of harriers and buteos, except for Broad-winged Hawks, which are notoriously early migrants. We also stand the best chance of seeing Golden Eagle and this time is also the sweet spot for accipiters, possibly even Goshawk.

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary is an organized non-profit operation with an established visitor center and miles of marked trails, including a portion of the Appalachian Trail. The ascent to the hawk watch is a manageable uphill walk of about a mile, a 30- to 45-minute climb. There is also an admission charge: $10 for adults; $7 for seniors.

We'll assemble as a group at 8 AM at a breakfast stop, Clinton Station Diner, in Clinton, NJ, about an hour-and-a-half from Queens. From there it’s another hour and 15 minutes to Hawk Mountain. Take I-78 west in NJ to Exit 13 and bear right at every turn to the diner. The diner is a rail car visible from the Interstate.

If you want to go directly to the hawk watch, contact me and I’ll provide those directions.
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, 1700 Hawk Mountain Rd, Kempton, PA 19529

If we get fair weather that day with favorable Northwest winds, we stand a chance of having a very productive outing.

Non members are welcome on our trips and we would appreciate a nominal $5 (or more!) voluntary donation for non-member participation. We prefer if you offer instead of being asked.
All persons (member or not) are required to offer contribution if they get a ride with another.
All persons are requested to Notify the leader at least 2 days in advance if they want to go on a trip.
Be on time. We depart promptly.


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South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, October 27, 2019
Jones Beach Coast Guard Station Parking Area
From the Wantagh State Parkway, travel south. Upon entering Jones Beach State Park, exit at Bay Drive and continue west. Turn right (north) at entrance for Coast Guard Station and West End Boat Basin; turn right again for parking.
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


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Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, October 26, 2019
Audubon Bird Walk at Queens Botanical Garden, Queens
9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
Spot and identify creatures of flight and learn how QBG provides important resources for birds.
...Read more

Saturday, October 19, 2019

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, October 18, 2019:

-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Oct. 18, 2019
* NYNY1910.18

- Birds Mentioned

VARIED THRUSH+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Brant
King Eider
AMERICAN AVOCET
MARBLED GODWIT
Stilt Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Long-billed Dowitcher
POMARINE JAEGER
Parasitic Jaeger
BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE
Caspian Tern
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
BROWN PELICAN
American Bittern
WESTERN KINGBIRD
American Robin
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW
Vesper Sparrow
LARK SPARROW
Grasshopper Sparrow
Nelson’s Sparrow
Yellow-breasted Chat
Orange-crowned Warbler
Connecticut Warbler
Hooded Warbler
BLUE GROSBEAK
DICKCISSEL

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, October 18, 2019 at 9:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are VARIED THRUSH, BROWN PELICAN, AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN, WESTERN KINGBIRD, POMARINE JAEGER, AMERICAN AVOCET, MARBLED GODWIT, BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE, CLAY-COLORED and LARK SPARROWS, BLUE GROSBEAK, DICKCISSEL and more.

Another week of less than ideal conditions did today provide a nice surprise when a male VARIED THRUSH was spotted at the Alley Pond Environmental Center in Queens. The bird, feeding with American Robins, was seen briefly but disappeared along the trail that goes south from the parking lot along the boardwalk that leads to the observation platform. The entrance to APEC is off Northern Boulevard just east of the Cross Island Parkway.

An interesting incursion of BROWN PELICANS last Sunday included 15 seen moving east past Staten Island’s Huguenot Avenue Beach in the afternoon, after 3 were seen earlier off Franklin D. Roosevelt Beach in Ocean Breeze. Other Sunday sightings featured 1 off Fort Tilden, 3 off Brooklyn’s Coney Island Beach and 1 going west by Jones Beach West End. Monday provided 1 further east off Dune Road east of Triton Lane followed Tuesday by 1 moving by Mecox Bay.

There was also a report of an AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN visiting Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge’s West Pond for a while on Wednesday.

A WESTERN KINGBIRD found last Sunday at West Meadow Beach in Stony Brook was not reported there after Tuesday.

A sea watch off Riis Park last Wednesday recorded a POMARINE JAEGER along with 2 PARASITIC and 2 unidentified JAEGERS as well as an immature BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE.

The 3 AMERICAN AVOCETS on Jamaica Bay’s East Pond recently were down to 2 by Thursday, when 4 LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS were also reported there; STILT and PECTORAL SANDPIPERS were also noted there last weekend.

Three or four MARBLED GODWITS continue to be seen on the island off the Coast Guard Station at Jones Beach West End through today, and a couple of CASPIAN TERNS visited there in mid-week.

A female KING EIDER was still around Orient Point last Saturday, when an AMERICAN BITTERN was spotted at the Oceanside Marine Nature Study Area.

At Jones Beach West End a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was around the hedgerow by the Coast Guard Station from Monday through today, when a second was also located nearby.

The Prospect Park LARK SPARROW was last reported last Saturday, when another was seen at an East Hampton farm.

A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was found in Central Park today at the Oven, and a VESPER SPARROW was located Tuesday at the recently opened Shirley Chisholm State Park, the former landfill reached from the southern end of Pennsylvania Avenue in Brooklyn. The extensive grasslands there could prove to be very interesting.

NELSON’S SPARROWS are now very widespread in salt marshes locally, including such locations as Plumb Beach, the Oceanside Marine Nature Study Area and Pelham Bay Park.

YELLOW-BREASTED CHATS were noted at Prospect Park Sunday, Montauk Point Monday, and Robert Moses State Park today.

Among the decreasing variety of WARBLERS was a CONNECTICUT identified during the morning flight at Robert Moses State Park last Sunday, and a HOODED male was at Battery Park on Tuesday. Now is a decent time to look for ORANGE CROWNED WARBLERS.

BLUE GROSBEAKS this week included singles at Captree State Park Sunday, Jones Beach West End Tuesday, and Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn today.

A few DICKCISSELS included Sunday sightings from Fort Tilden to Robert Moses State Park and Montauk Point and up to Croton Point, with another at Jones Beach West End Monday.

Large numbers of Brant began arriving today

To phone in reports please call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Treehugger Tuesday

From MNN.com:

Birds are in trouble, but you can help them
Mary Jo DiLonardo
October 11, 2019, 8:26 a.m.

Audubon Society amplifies report with new tool, tips for bird lovers.

Two-thirds of birds in North America are at risk due to warming temperatures and human impact on the planet.

Just last month, a study published in the journal Science found that nearly 3 billion birds have disappeared on the continent since 1970. Now, the National Audubon Society has followed up with increasingly sobering news.

Scientists used 140 million records from field biologists and bird watchers to outline where 604 bird species live now. Then then used climate models to forecast how each species' range will likely shift as climate change and other human elements continue to have an impact.

The report found that 64% of species (389 of 604) were moderately or highly vulnerable to climate change. Vulnerability often depended on habitat. For example, 100% of Arctic bird species, 98% of boreal forest birds, 86% of western forest birds and 78% of waterbirds were vulnerable to climate change. The least vulnerable birds included those in marshlands (41%) and urban/suburban areas (38%). However, even in groups that were not as susceptible, more than a quarter were considered climate-vulnerable.


Species vulnerability grouped by habitat Species vulnerability varies depending upon habitat. (Photo: Stamen Design/National Audubon Society)

Researchers detailed the results along with maps and information on the species in the report, "Survival by Degrees: 389 Species on the Brink."

"Two-thirds of America's birds are threatened with extinction from climate change, but keeping global temperatures down will help up to 76 percent of them. There's hope in this report, but first, it'll break your heart if you care about birds and what they tell us about the ecosystems we share with them. It's a bird emergency," said David Yarnold, CEO and president of Audubon, in a statement.

The report studied climate-related impacts such as sea level rise and lake level changes, urban land use changes, cropland expansion, drought, extreme spring heat, fire weather and heavy rains.

"Birds are important indicator species, because if an ecosystem is broken for birds, it is or soon will be for people too," said Brooke Bateman, Ph.D., senior climate scientist for the National Audubon Society.

How you can help

Along with the report, Audubon offers a ZIP-code based tool so you can see which impacts from climate change are expected in your area and which bird species will be affected.

"We already know what we need to do to reduce global warming, and we already have a lot of the tools we need to take those steps. Now, what we need are more people committed to making sure those solutions are put into practice," said Renee Stone, vice president of climate for the National Audubon Society. "Our elected officials at every level of government must hear from their constituents that this is a priority. Audubon is committed to protecting the places birds need now and in the future and taking action to address the root causes of climate change."

You can help our flying friends and attract more birds to your yard by adding native trees, bushes and other plants that offer food and protection, as MNN's Tom Oder explains in detail. But Audubon also outlines five bigger-picture ways you can help birds survive through your actions at home and by advocating for the spaces they call home:

1 - Reduce energy use at home and ask elected officials to support energy-saving policies.
2 - Ask elected officials to expand clean energy development – like solar or wind power.
3 - Reduce carbon pollution released into the atmosphere. To lower carbon emissions, they suggest innovative solutions like a fee on carbon and setting a clean energy standard for electricity generation.
4 - Advocate for natural solutions such as protecting forests and grasslands that provide homes to birds and installing native plants to help birds adapt to climate change.
5 - Ask elected leaders to be climate and conservation champions.
...Read more

Monday, October 14, 2019

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming birding and nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, October 19, 2019 to Sunday, October 20, 2019:

Bedford Audubon Society
August 25, 2019 through November 25, 2019, 9:00am-5:00pm
Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch
Arthur Butler Sanctuary, Bedford, NY
Spectacular flocks of Broad-winged Hawks pass through our area in mid-September, but Accipiters such as Sharp-shinned + Cooper’s Hawks provide the most consistent flight throughout the fall hawk-watching season.

Join us for Science in Action: Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch to experience the miracle of raptor migration. Our data is combined with other Hawkwatch sites to create population and migration analyses that help us better protect raptors and their habitats.

Registration not necessary.
See more details

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Brooklyn Bird Club
Saturday, October 19, 2019
Floyd Bennett Field
Leader: Rob Jett
Focus: Open space and grassland species, sparrows, raptors, early waterfowl
Car Pool Fee: $10.00
Registrar: Donna Evans email devansny@earthlink.net
Registration Period: Oct 12th – Oct 17th
Please review our trip guidelines here: http://brooklynbirdclub.org/information-registration

Saturday, October 19, 2019, 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Prospect Park: Birdwatching for Beginners
Leader: Cyrus Baty
Birdwatching for Beginners meets at the Prospect Park Audubon Center at The Boathouse at 12 noon. Bring binoculars if you have them; otherwise, binoculars are available for loan.

Sunday, October 20, 2019, 9:00am - 10:00am
Fort Greene Park, North Brooklyn
Meet 9 am at the Urban Park Rangers Visitors Center https://tinyurl.com/FtGreeneVCtr
Leader: August Davidson-Onsgard AugustDavidsonOnsgard.com
Focus: Fall migration of songbirds at a historical park.
No registration necessary.
Nearest train stations: DeKalb Avenue station; exit and walk 5 blocks east on DeKalb Avenue; Also Fulton Ave A and G lines, walk north on South Portland Ave
Site references: https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/fort-greene-park ; https://tinyurl.com/FTGreeneMaylist

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Feminist Bird Club
Friday, October 18, 2019
3 Year Anniversary at Sundown Bar with Ha's Dac Biet

Saturday, October 19, 2019
Shirley Chisholm State Park with Queens County Bird Club

All walks follow the ABA Code of Birding Ethics

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Gateway National Park
Sunday, October, 20 2019, 10:00am — 3:00pm
Jamaica Bay Raptorama
View Details

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Great South Bay Audubon Society
Saturday, October 19, 2019, 8:30am
Caumsett SP
Leader(s): John Gluth (631-827-0120) Ken Thompson (631-612-8028)
Northern State to exit 42N (Route 35). 35 to 25A. 25A west to West Neck Road (right turn). West Neck/Lloyd Harbor Rd. into Lloyd Neck. Entrance to park on left. Meet in Parking lot.

(Nature walks will be cancelled if it is raining or snowing.)

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Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, October 20, 2019, 7:15am - 8:45am
Birding in Peace
Before our gates open to the general public, birding expert Rob Jett leads these peaceful Sunday morning walking tours to discover the birds that make Green-Wood their home – at least temporarily.

By September, offspring of these nesting birds will be on their own. Returning warblers will be in their less flamboyant fall plumage. Large numbers of blackbirds, flycatchers, sparrows, vireos, and swallows will also be passing through. By October, waterfowl are returning, and we’ll look for raptors heading south. November will bring back our overwintering feathered denizens from the north.

All walks are at a slow pace on easy to moderate terrain, but proper, close toed footwear is suggested.
$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members
Click here for our inclement weather policy.


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Hudson River Audubon Society
Saturday, October 19, 2019
Lenoir Nature Preserve
Hawk Watch
19 Dudley St. Yonkers
Meet at 10 AM behind the Lenoir Mansion
http://www.hras.org/wtobird/lenoir.html

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Linnaean Society of New York
Saturday, October 19, 2019
Fort Tilden 2
Leader: Richard ZainEldeen
Registrar: Pearl Broder — pbroder3@nyc.rr.com or 212-924-0030
Registration opens: Monday, October 7
Ride: $15

Sunday, October 20, 2019
Randall’s Island
Leader: Alan Drogin
Registrar: Miriam Rakowski — miriamrakowski@hotmail.com or 212-749-7376
Registration opens: Monday, October 7
Ride: $10 or public transportation

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New York City Audubon
Saturday, October 19, 2019, 7:30am-4:30pm
Raptor Trust and Great Swamp, NJ
Guide: Tod Winston
Enjoy a private tour of the Raptor Trust rehabilitation center and see many owls and hawks up close. Afterward, we’ll hike the boardwalk trails of the beautiful Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge to look for raptors, waterfowl, reptiles, and amphibians. Bring lunch. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $122 (86)
Click here to register

Saturday, October 19, 2019, 9am-noon
Fall Walk at Inwood Hill Park
Guide: Nadir Souirgi
Inwood Hill Park, simply put, is a jewel. Nestled between the Hudson River, Dyckman Street, and Seaman Avenue, this last tract of largely undeveloped oak and tulip forest transports you to another world and another time. Glacial "pot holes," towering trees, and stunning river views create an unrivaled birding backdrop. Limited to 15 per walk. $36 (25) per walk
Click here to register

Saturdays, September 7 and October 19, 9-10:30am
Birding in Brooklyn Bridge Park
Guide: Heather Wolf
Meet at Pier 1 park entrance at the intersection of Old Fulton Street and Furman Street. Join Heather Wolf, author of Birding at the Bridge, for a picturesque bird walk along the Brooklyn waterfront searching for fall migrants. Registration preferred. Limited to 19 per walk. Free
Click here to register

Saturday, October 19, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Van Cortlandt Park Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 7-November 23, 9-10:30am
Guides: NYC Audubon with the Van Cortlandt Park Alliance
Meet at the southeast corner of the Mosholu Avenue park entrance. The history of birding and Van Cortlandt Park are inseparable. Influential birders such as Roger Tory Peterson and Allan D. Cruickshank got their starts on Van Cortlandt’s ecologically diverse grounds. These walks celebrate the tradition set forth by these great ornithologists. Participants will look for various species of residents and migrants and discuss a wide range of avian topics. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Saturdays, September 14, September 28 and October 19, 2-3pm
Sunday, October 6, 2-3pm

Governors Island Free Bird Walks
Guide: NYC Audubon
Meet at Nolan Park House #17. Join us for a bird walk around beautiful and historic Governors Island, which boasts over 200 species on ebird.org. Learn about the island's fascinating history and search for waterbirds, raptors, waterfowl, and more. Binoculars are available. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Friday, October 25, 2019, 8-11am
Friday Morning Fall Migration Walk in the North End, Central Park
Guide: Gabriel Willow
Most NYC birders are familiar with the Ramble, but fewer visit the north end of Central Park, which includes equally productive woodlands, waterways, and meadows. The Pool, Loch, Ravine, and North Woods are some of the wildest and most beautiful areas of Central Park, and during fall migration are full of warblers, vireos, thrushes, orioles, tanagers, cuckoos, and more. Limited to 15 per walk. $36 (25) per walk
Click here to register

Sunday, October 20, 2019, 8:30-11am
Fall Migrants of Woodlawn Cemetery
Guides: Tod Winston, Joseph McManus, Susan Olsen with Woodlawn Conservancy
Join us for a morning bird walk and tour of beautiful Woodlawn Cemetery: Tod Winston and Joseph McManus will help look for fall migrants and year-round residents on the expansive, wooded cemetery grounds, while the Woodlawn Conservancy's Susan Olsen will share fascinating stories about Woodlawn’s history and the interesting mixture of individuals interred there. Visit www.thewoodlawncemetery.org/events to register. Limited to 20. $35 (25)
Click here to register

Sunday, October 20, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Pelham Bay Park Bird Walks
Sundays, September 8-December 8, 9-10:30am
Guide: NYC Audubon with Pelham Bay Park
September 8: Meets at Rodman’s Neck Parking Lot
September 15-December 8: Meet at Orchard Beach Parking Lot
Join us to explore some of the best birding NYC has to offer. Come discover Pelham Bay Park's diverse habitat that attracts a variety of fall migrants. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Sunday, October 20, 2019, 9:30am – 10:30am
Queens Botanical Garden Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 14 and October 26,
Sundays, October 6, October 20, and November 3, 9:30-10:30am
Guide: Corey Finger with Queens Botanical Garden
Explore Queens Botanical Garden in search of migrant songbirds and learn about the valuable resources that the Garden offers birds and other wildlife. Binoculars available. Register for one date or the whole series of five walks (walk-ins welcome). Email info@queensbotanical.org or visit www.queensbotanical.org/calendar to register. Limited to 25 per walk. Free (with Garden admission)

Sunday, October 20, 2019, 10am-3pm
Raptorama! Festival at Jamaica Bay
With American Littoral Society, Jamaica Bay/Rockway Parks Conservancy, and Gateway National Recreation Area
Meet at the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center for a program on hawks and owls, plus a live demonstration where one can get up-close views of local hawks, owls, and eagles. After lunch, we’ll go to Fort Tilden to see the many hawk species flying south for the winter. For more information, contact American Littoral Society at 718-474-0896 or don@littoralsociety.org. No registration necessary. Free (donation suggested)

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

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North Shore Audubon Society
Saturday, October 19, 2019, 9:30am – 12:00pm
Oceanside - Marine Nature Study Area
Leader: Ralph 516-785-3375
Where: 500 Slice Dr, Oceanside, NY 11572 (map)

Please inform walk leader that you are attending.
See "Walk Locations" for directions.
Wear water-resistant footwear, bring binoculars and drinking water. Wear long pants and socks so you do not touch poison ivy.


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NYC H2O
Saturday, October 19th and Sunday, October 20th
Ridgewood Reservoir Open House NY Weekend Event
View Details

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Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Sunday, October 20, 2019, 1:00pm-3:00pm
Long Pond Park – North Mt Loretto State Forest
Participants will observe a variety of ecosystems as we search for evidence of animal life, the geologic history and human influence throughout this diverse area on the south shore.
Meet at the parking lot for North Mt. Loretto on Amboy Road in Richmond Valley.
For more information phone Clay Wollney at (718)869-6327.

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Queens County Bird Club
Saturday, October 19, 2019, 8:30am – 11:30am
Shirley Chisholm State Park
Please register via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/queens-co-bird-club-birding-shirley-chisholm-state-park-with-the-feminist-bird-club-tickets-74900325891?aff=ebdssbeac
On this mini-trip, we will explore this newly opened park!
Unlike most state parks, this one does not have a parking fee.

https://parks.ny.gov/parks/200/details.aspx
Shirley Chisholm State Park is named in honor of Shirley Chisholm, a Brooklyn-born trailblazer who was the first African American Congresswoman, as well as the first woman and African American to run for President.

Rising up 130 feet above sea level, this new park occupies some of the highest ground in New York City and offers spectacular panoramic views of the Empire State Building to the northwest, the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge and New York Harbor to the west, and Jamaica Bay to the south.

Non members are welcome on our trips and we would appreciate a nominal $5 (or more!) voluntary donation for non-member participation. We prefer if you offer instead of being asked.
All persons (member or not) are required to offer contribution if they get a ride with another.
All persons are requested to Notify the leader at least 2 days in advance if they want to go on a trip.
Be on time. We depart promptly.


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South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, October 20, 2019
Alley Pond Park
Take the Long Island Expressway west to Exit 29 (Springfield Blvd.). Turn left onto Springfield Blvd. south. Go five blocks and turn left onto 76th Ave. Quickly turn left into the 76th Ave. parking lot. We will meet at the far end of the lot. For a street map that shows the parking lot (and the entire neighborhood), go to www.nycgovparks.org/parks/alleypondpark/map (Google Maps labels it “Aarya park Parking lot"). For online directions, enter "76th Ave 11364" as the location.
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


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Urban Park Rangers
Sunday, October 20, 2019
Audubon Bird Walk at Queens Botanical Garden, Queens
9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
Spot and identify creatures of flight and learn how QBG provides important resources for birds— like water, shelter, and insects to eat.

Birding: Raptor Watch at Gateway Drive and Erskine Street (in Spring Creek Park), Brooklyn
10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
Birding programs are appropriate for all skill levels and beginners are welcome.
Free!

Birding: Fall Migration at Rose and Oak Avenues (in Kissena Park), Queens
10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
Our Urban Park Rangers will guide you to the best viewing spots in New York City to see fall migratory birds. Birding programs are appropriate for all skill levels.
Free!
...Read more

Saturday, October 12, 2019

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, October 11, 2019:

- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Oct. 11, 2019
* NYNY1910.11

- Birds mentioned
PARASITIC JAEGER
Caspian Tern
Royal Tern
KING EIDER
WILSON'S PHALAROPE
AMERICAN AVOCET
Long-billed Dowitcher
Stilt Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
MARBLED GODWIT
HUDSONIAN GODWIT
Whimbrel
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Black-billed Cuckoo
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Red-headed Woodpecker
WESTERN KINGBIRD
LARK SPARROW
White-crowned Sparrow
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW
Lincoln's Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
BLUE GROSBEAK
DICKCISSEL
Philadelphia Vireo
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER
Orange-crowned Warbler
Tennessee Warbler
Cape May Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Prairie Warbler
CONNECTICUT WARBLER
YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT
Hooded Warbler
Canada Warbler
American Pipit
Winter Wren
SEDGE WREN
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44 (at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, October 11th 2019 at 9pm. The highlights of today's tape are SEDGE WREN, WESTERN KINGBIRD, AMERICAN AVOCET, HUDSONIAN GODWIT, MARBLED GODWIT, WILSON'S PHALAROPE, KING EIDER, PARASITIC JAEGER, PROTHONOTARY WARBLER, CONNECTICUT WARBLER, YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, DICKCISSEL, BLUE GROSBEAK, LARK SPARROW and CLAY-COLORED SPARROW.

A nice variety of birds this week, despite the unfavorable weather, was highlighted by a SEDGE WREN found a photographed at Pelham Bay Park last Saturday afternoon. Another unusual migrant found today on Staten Island was a WESTERN KINGBIRD spotted at Brookfield Park which is just north of Arthur Kill Road where it intersects with Brookfield Avenue.

The storm rolling through our area Tuesday into Wednesday provided a nice fallout of HUDSONIAN GODWITS at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge with a maximum of 31 counted Wednesday morning at the south end of the East Pond. They were joined by a MARBLED GODWIT as well but unfortunately none of the godwits lingered there beyond Wednesday. However 3 AMERICAN AVOCETS have continued around the north end of the East Pond at least to yesterday and among the other shorebirds reported there this week have been 2 WILSON'S PHALAROPES Thursday as well as a small number of LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS and PECTORAL, STILT and WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS. Unfortunately the water level on the pond remains much higher than it should be for optimum shorebirding. A single HUDSONIAN GODWIT was seen again at the Oceanside Marine Nature Study Area last Saturday and up to 5 MARBLED GODWITS were still around Jones Inlet at least to Tuesday often seen on the island just east of the Coast Guard Station. A WHIMBREL flew by Lemon Creek Pier on Staten Island last Saturday.

A seawatch from Robert Moses State Park field 2 yesterday did produce 4 PARASITIC JAEGERS while today's watch netted 2 CASPIAN and 44 ROYAL TERNS. A couple of CASPIANS were also noted this week at Jones Beach and Mecox Bay.

A female KING EIDER continues off Orient Point while a RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was spotted in Central Park Tuesday.

The highlight among the warblers this week was a male PROTHONOTARY WARBLER found Tuesday afternoon in Manhattan's Bryant Park still present Thursday. A CONNECTICUT WARBLER was found at Teatown Lake Reservation in central Westchester last Saturday and ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS were noted at Caumsett State Park Sunday and in Prospect Park Wednesday and Thursday. Among the diminishing numbers of warblers this week were reports of TENNESSEE, CAPE MAY, BAY-BREASTED, BLACKBURNIAN, CHESTNUT-SIDED, PRAIRIE, HOODED and CANADA among others. YELLOW-BREASTED CHATS last Saturday in Central Park and at Tobay Sanctuary were followed by one in Manhattan's Herald Square Park on Tuesday while a few PHILADELPHIA VIREOS included sightings in Prospect and Kissena Parks and at Floyd Bennett Field.

DICKCISSELS this week included one in Caumsett State Park Sunday, another at Alley Pond Park Monday and one at the Chandler's Estate in Miller Place yesterday and today and a BLUE GROSBEAK was also found in Alley Pond Park Monday. A LARK SPARROW was present in Prospect Park all week and CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS visited Central Park's north end and Kissena Park Saturday and Caumsett State Park Sunday.

Other migrants recently included both cuckoos, many more YELLOW-BILLED than BLACK-BILLED, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER and passerines featuring AMERICAN PIPIT, WINTER WREN, both RUBY-CROWNED and GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS and such sparrows as LINCOLN'S and WHITE-CROWNED with a FOX in Central Park Saturday as well as some NELSON'S SPARROWS mostly in coastal saltmarshes but also occasionally inland.

To phone in reports call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
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Tuesday, October 08, 2019

Treehugger Tuesday

From Earther:

The Most Polluting State in the Northeast Just Took a Key Step Toward Curbing Its Dirty Ways
October 7, 2019

Thursday was a momentous day for the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), a carbon market that governs power plant emissions in nine states. Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf signed an executive order entering the state into the agreement.

In doing so, he immediately doubled the amount of carbon emissions regulated under the agreement. The order will still have to go through the state’s rule-making process, and it won’t have a direct impact on the state’s fracking boom, a major source of emissions being exported to other states and the world. But it’s nonetheless an interesting development in a state long associated with coal that’s also recently helped drive the natural gas boom.

RGGI has been around for a decade as the first U.S. carbon market. The idea behind it is that states that are part of the market set a cap on power plant carbon pollution and then let companies trade allowances under that cap, essentially putting a price on carbon. The amount of allowed carbon pollution drops over time, forcing power companies to either pay for more pollution permits or invest in lower-emissions technologies.

Pennsylvania adds some major oomph to the agreement, which has included states with fairly robust economies like New York and Massachusetts but lower carbon emissions. Pennsylvania gets more than half of its electricity through coal and gas generation, with most of the natural gas plants coming online in recent years.

“Gas has been so cheap, it pushed coal almost out of the power sector,” Mark Szybist, a senior attorney at Natural Resources Defense Council, told Earther about the state’s energy mix.

Szybist added that the state is at an inflection point as it prepares to enter RGGI. Natural gas has already helped the state cut its carbon pollution because it burns cleaner than coal. But, he added, natural gas is “starting to replace nuclear power,” which is carbon-free.

The state could keep also cutting its coal usage and likely meet its RGGI requirements. That’s why Szybist said joining the agreement isn’t enough to ensure Pennsylvania actualizes real, deep carbon cuts. He pointed to the need for renewable portfolio standards—rules that dictate a state has to get a certain amount of power from renewables by a certain year—as well as energy efficiency improvements as ways to make the carbon cuts for real. Renewable portfolio standards in particular have proven to be wildly successful, and Pennsylvania has some room for improvement. Food and Water Watch said it would give the state an F for what it currently has in place, partly because the state counts dirty forms of energy, such as wood burning, as renewable.

One other major gap is that RGGI only covers power plant emissions. Which, sure, those need to be drawn down. But Pennsylvania has also been Boomtown USA when it comes to fracking. Power plant greenhouse gas emissions accounted for just 30 percent of all state emissions in 2015, according to state data. That same year, energy production outpaced electricity emissions for the first time, and it could keep growing as long as the fracking boom continues.

Another concern is whether executive action alone is enough to ensure the state can join RGGI. New Jersey left the agreement under Chris Christie’s leadership, only to announce it was re-entering the agreement under recently elected Democrat Phil Murphy. Virginia planned to do the same under Democratic Governor Ralph Northam, but his effort was shutdown by the Republican-controlled state house earlier this year (the irony being that RGGI is the type of market mechanism conservatives used to love).

Republicans in the Pennsylvania statehouse could stop Wolf’s attempt to join the agreement. But Szybist said he felt confident discussions about the agreement between the governor and legislature that began before Wolf signed the executive order would continue.

“As this process moves forward, the legislature will further understand what RGGI is,” he said. “And we’ll have at least one election between now and the time the rule is finished.”
...Read more

Monday, October 07, 2019

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming birding and nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, October 12, 2019 to Sunday, October 13, 2019:

Bedford Audubon Society
August 25, 2019 through November 25, 2019, 9:00am-5:00pm
Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch
Arthur Butler Sanctuary, Bedford, NY
Spectacular flocks of Broad-winged Hawks pass through our area in mid-September, but Accipiters such as Sharp-shinned + Cooper’s Hawks provide the most consistent flight throughout the fall hawk-watching season.

Join us for Science in Action: Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch to experience the miracle of raptor migration. Our data is combined with other Hawkwatch sites to create population and migration analyses that help us better protect raptors and their habitats.

Registration not necessary.
See more details

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Brooklyn Bird Club
Saturday, October 12, 2019, All Day
Kissena Park, Queens
Leader: Richard Payne
Focus: Sparrows peak and late Neotropical migrants, raptors
Car Pool Fee: $10.00
Registrar: Michael Yuan email mjyuan@gmail.com
Registration Period: Oct 5th - Oct 10th
Please review our trip guidelines here: http://brooklynbirdclub.org/information-registration
Find out more »

Saturday, October 12, 2019, 7:30am - 11:00am
Prospect Park Saturday Fall Migration Walk
Meet 7:30 am at the “Pergola” entrance on Ocean and Parkside Avenues (NOTE NEW TIME!)
Leader: Dennis Hrehowsik
No registration necessary.
Note: Nearest train stops Prospect Park (B express) and Parkside Avenues (local) Q trains

Saturday, October 12, 2019, 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Prospect Park: Birdwatching for Beginners
Leader: Cyrus Baty
Birdwatching for Beginners meets at the Prospect Park Audubon Center at The Boathouse at 12 noon. Bring binoculars if you have them; otherwise, binoculars are available for loan.

Saturday, October 12, 2019, 8:00am - 11:00am
Ridgewood Reservoir Walk
Leaders: Steve Nanz and Heidi Steiner-Nanz
Focus: Observing fall migrants.
Registrar: Email Heidi Steiner at heidi.steiner.bklyn@gmail.com if you would like to car pool. Or, meet at 8:00AM at the top of the stairs of the main entrance, directly across Vermont Place from the parking lot.
Car pool fee: $10
Please review our trip guidelines here: http://brooklynbirdclub.org/information-registration
Find out more »

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Gateway National Park
Saturday, October 12, 2019, 10:00am — 11:00am
Birding for Beginners
View Details

Saturday, October 12, 2019, 10:00am — 11:00am
Fall Hawk Migration
View Details

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Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, October 13, 2019, 7:15am - 8:45am
Birding in Peace
Before our gates open to the general public, birding expert Rob Jett leads these peaceful Sunday morning walking tours to discover the birds that make Green-Wood their home – at least temporarily.

By September, offspring of these nesting birds will be on their own. Returning warblers will be in their less flamboyant fall plumage. Large numbers of blackbirds, flycatchers, sparrows, vireos, and swallows will also be passing through. By October, waterfowl are returning, and we’ll look for raptors heading south. November will bring back our overwintering feathered denizens from the north.

All walks are at a slow pace on easy to moderate terrain, but proper, close toed footwear is suggested.
$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members
Click here for our inclement weather policy.


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Hudson River Audubon Society
Saturday, October 12, 2019
Lenoir Nature Preserve
The BIG SIT and Hawk Watch
19 Dudley St. Yonkers
Meet at 10 AM behind the Lenoir Mansion
The object of the "BIG SIT" is to tally as many bird species as we can in a day from a single position. We'll be out on the Lenoir lawn (at our hawk watch sight) overlooking the Hudson River and Palisades. Bring a chair, drink and snacks and join us anytime on that day and help us find the birds!
http://www.hras.org/wtobird/lenoir.html

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Linnaean Society of New York
Sunday, October 13, 2019, 7:30am
7TH Annual Starr Saphir Memorial Fall Migration Walk, Central Park
Leader: Lenore Swenson — information only lenoreswenson@gmail.com or 212-533-9567
No registration. Public transportation
Meet at 103rd Street and Central Park West at 7:30am

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New York City Audubon
Saturday, October 12, 2019, 8am – 8pm
NYC Audubon Day at Hawk Mountain, PA
Guides: Gabriel Willow, Hawk Mountain Education Specialist
Mid-October is the perfect time to visit Hawk Mountain, one of the premier hawk-watching spots in the East. Gabriel Willow and a Hawk Mountain education specialist will introduce us to the variety of raptors that may be seen, including Golden Eagles, buteos, and falcons.
The path to the hawk watch site is a .75-mile hike through mountainous woodland. Bring lunch. Group program, trail admission, and transportation by van included. Limited to 12. $139 (97)
Click here to register

Saturday, October 12, 2019, 8am – 4pm
Migration Along the Barrier Islands, Long Island
Guide: Tod Winston
Look for migrating raptors and songbirds as they stop and rest along Long Island's barrier islands. We'll venture to some of the best spots in the vicinity of Jones Beach to find what surprises the north winds have brought us. Bring lunch, water, and binoculars. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $122 (85)
Click here to register

Saturday, October 12, 2019, 9:00am – 11:30am
Fall Migrants of Inwood Hill Park
Guide: Annie Barry
Join Annie Barry for a hike through a mature forest in search of kinglets, warblers, flycatchers, sparrows, thrushes, and more, then search the shore of the Inwood Hill Park saltmarshes for herons and ducks. Some hilly walking required. Limited to 15. $36 (25)
Click here to register

Saturday, October 12, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Van Cortlandt Park Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 7-November 23, 9-10:30am
Guides: NYC Audubon with the Van Cortlandt Park Alliance
Meet at the southeast corner of the Mosholu Avenue park entrance. The history of birding and Van Cortlandt Park are inseparable. Influential birders such as Roger Tory Peterson and Allan D. Cruickshank got their starts on Van Cortlandt’s ecologically diverse grounds. These walks celebrate the tradition set forth by these great ornithologists. Participants will look for various species of residents and migrants and discuss a wide range of avian topics. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Saturday, October 12, 2019, 2:00pm – 3:30pm
An Afternoon Bird Walk in Central Park
Guides: Jeff Ward
Search for fall migrants on a leisurely afternoon walk through Central Park's best birding spots. Limited to 15 per walk. $36 (25) per walk
Click here to register

Sunday, October 13, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Pelham Bay Park Bird Walks
Sundays, September 8-December 8, 9-10:30am
Guide: NYC Audubon with Pelham Bay Park
September 8: Meets at Rodman’s Neck Parking Lot
September 15-December 8: Meet at Orchard Beach Parking Lot
Join us to explore some of the best birding NYC has to offer. Come discover Pelham Bay Park's diverse habitat that attracts a variety of fall migrants. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Sunday, October 13, 2019, 9:30am – 10:30am
Queens Botanical Garden Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 14 and October 26,
Sundays, October 6, October 20, and November 3, 9:30-10:30am
Guide: Corey Finger with Queens Botanical Garden
Explore Queens Botanical Garden in search of migrant songbirds and learn about the valuable resources that the Garden offers birds and other wildlife. Binoculars available. Register for one date or the whole series of five walks (walk-ins welcome). Email info@queensbotanical.org or visit www.queensbotanical.org/calendar to register. Limited to 25 per walk. Free (with Garden admission)

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

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New York City WILD!
Saturday, October 12, 2019, 4:30pm
NYC Wild! Essentials: Manhattan: Full Moon South Street Seaport and Brooklyn Bridge Walk

For the FULL INFORMATION ABOUT EACH WALK click HERE to take you to the Eventbrite Profile page where you will find all details (scroll down to the thumbnails) for each of the outings and how to SIGN UP

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North Shore Audubon Society
Saturday/Sunday, October 12 – 13, 2019
Big Sit!
Your favorite birding spot (map)
Description: https://www.birdwatchersdigest.com/bwdsite/connect/bigsit/about.php

Saturday, October 12, 2019, 9:30am – 12:00pm
Garvies Point Preserve
Leader: Lenore 718-343-1391
Garvies Point Museum-Preserve, 50 Barry Dr, Glen Cove, NY 11542 (map)

Please inform walk leader that you are attending.
See "Walk Locations" for directions.
Wear water-resistant footwear, bring binoculars and drinking water. Wear long pants and socks so you do not touch poison ivy.


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Queens County Bird Club
Saturday, October 12, 2019
Big Sit
Leader: Corey Finger - 10000birdsblogger@gmail.com
Where: 40.564226, -73.885753 (map)
The QCBC "Big Sit" takes place from dawn to dusk. You may come and go as you choose. Park in the lot shown in the map. Then, proceed west on Range Road (may also be called Murray Rd or Center Rd) until you reach the observation platform near Battery Harris East. You need to climb up several flights of stairs to access the platform.
To find the platform on a map, either:

Search on Google Maps for "Observation Platform - Ft Tilden"
Or copy/paste these coordinates into your map app: 40.561439, -73.893360

Here is part of the official description the "Big Sit": Some people have called it a “tailgate party for birders.” Find a good spot for bird watching—preferably one with good views of a variety of habitats and lots of birds. Next, create a real or imaginary circle 17 feet in diameter and sit inside the circle for 24 hours, counting all the bird species you see or hear. That’s it. Find a spot, sit in it, have fun. Then submit your findings. https://www.birdwatchersdigest.com/bwdsite/connect/bigsit/about.php

Sunday, October 13, 2019
Big Sit - Rain Date
Leader: Corey Finger - 10000birdsblogger@gmail.com

Non members are welcome on our trips and we would appreciate a nominal $5 (or more!) voluntary donation for non-member participation. We prefer if you offer instead of being asked.
All persons (member or not) are required to offer contribution if they get a ride with another.
All persons are requested to Notify the leader at least 2 days in advance if they want to go on a trip.
Be on time. We depart promptly.


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South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, October 13, 2019
Hempstead Lake State Park
From the Southern State Parkway, take Exit 18 (Eagle Avenue) south to Field 3 (use second park entrance and make an immediate left turn.)
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


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Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, October 12, 2019
Birding at the Ridgewood Reservoir at Vermont Place Parking Lot (in Highland Park), Queens
8:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.
Catch the fall migration and embrace the falling leaves at this bird watching workshop led by the Brooklyn Bird Club. Click here to register.
Free!

Birding: Hawk Watch at Pelham Bay Park, Bronx
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Join the Rangers as they hike up the hills of the Bronx-Pelham Landfill, the decommissioned landfill is now home to an abundance of wildlife. Registration is required.
Free!

Birding: Fall Migration at Hester Street and Forsyth Street (in M'finda Kalunga Garden), Manhattan
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Our Urban Park Rangers will guide you to the best viewing spots in New York City to see fall migratory birds. Birding programs are appropriate for all skill levels.
Free!

Sunday, October 13, 2019
Fall Birding at Perkins Visitors Center (in Wave Hill), Bronx
9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
Observe the plants, insects, and habitats at Wave Hill that make it so appealing for such a wide variety of birds.
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