Check out City Birder Tours, and Green-Wood sponsored tours on their calendar pages here.
Celebrate your inner nerd with my new t-shirt design! Available on my Spreadshirt shop in multiple colors and products.

Monday, November 11, 2019

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming birding and nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, November 16, 2019 to Sunday, November 17, 2019:

Bedford Audubon Society
August 25, 2019 through November 25, 2019, 9:00am-5:00pm
Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch
Arthur Butler Sanctuary, Bedford, NY
Spectacular flocks of Broad-winged Hawks pass through our area in mid-September, but Accipiters such as Sharp-shinned + Cooper’s Hawks provide the most consistent flight throughout the fall hawk-watching season.

Join us for Science in Action: Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch to experience the miracle of raptor migration. Our data is combined with other Hawkwatch sites to create population and migration analyses that help us better protect raptors and their habitats.

Registration not necessary.
See more details

Saturday, November 16, 2019, 8:00am - 1:00pm
Leader’s Choice with Naturalist-in-Residence Tait Johansson
Do you like surprises?
If so, save the date for a very Special Field Trip: Leader’s Choice with Naturalist-in-Residence Tait Johansson. November is the best month for rarities – while we may not be chasing a Fork-tailed Flycatcher, Tait will scout out the latest and greatest for the group to see.
Time and location to be determined! Will be within 1 ½ hrs. drive of Westchester.
Cost: Free.
Level of Difficulty: Easy-Moderate.
Please register with Susan at info@bedfordaudubon.org or 914-302-9713.
See more details

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Brooklyn Bird Club
Saturday, November 16, 2019
Exploring New Horizons and Adventures in Brooklyn and Queens
Leader: Ryan Goldberg
Focus: discovering newly opened preserves and trails in Brooklyn and Queens, including Marine Park (Seba Avenue trailhead on Gerritsen Ave), Shirley Chisholm State Park and Sunrise Cove Park (Broad Channel)
Car Pool Fee: $10.00
Registrar: Janet Schumacher email - janets33@optonline.net
Registration Period: Nov 9th - Nov 14th
Links: https://brooklyneagle.com/articles/2019/05/20/a-new-trail-shows-off-marine-parks-wild-side/; https://www.nycgovparks.org/park-features/hiking/marine-park; https://parks.ny.gov/parks/200/maps.aspx; https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/sunset-cove-park/map
Please review our trip guidelines here: http://brooklynbirdclub.org/information-registration

Saturday, November 16, 2019, 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Prospect Park: Birdwatching for Beginners
Leader: Cyrus Baty
Birdwatching for Beginners meets at the Prospect Park Audubon Center at The Boathouse at 12 noon. Bring binoculars if you have them; otherwise, binoculars are available for loan.

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Gateway Nation Parks
Saturday, November 16, 2019, 10am — 1pm
Winter Waterfowl Workshop
View Details

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Great South Bay Audubon Society
Sunday, November 17, 2019, 9:00am
Morton NWR
Leader(s): Bob Grover (516-318-8536) Ken Thompson (631-612-8028)
Sunrise Highway east past Shinnecock Canal. Look for a North Sea Road Noyack sign and bear left on CR52. Stay on CR52 and then turn left at light onto CR38. After 1.4 miles on CR38, turn right onto Noyack Road after 5 miles turn left onto refuge.

(Nature walks will be cancelled if it is raining or snowing.)

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Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, November 17, 2019, 6:30am - 8:00am
Birding in Peace
Before our gates open to the general public, birding expert Rob Jett leads these peaceful Sunday morning walking tours to discover the birds that make Green-Wood their home – some at least temporarily.

By September, offspring of these nesting birds will be on their own. Returning warblers will be in their less flamboyant fall plumage. Large numbers of blackbirds, flycatchers, sparrows, vireos, and swallows will also be passing through. By October, waterfowl are returning, and we’ll look for raptors heading south. November will bring back our overwintering feathered denizens from the north.

All walks are at a slow pace on easy to moderate terrain, but proper, close toed footwear is suggested.
$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members
Click here for our inclement weather policy.


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Huntington-Oyster Bay Audubon Society
Sunday, November 17, 2019, 9:00am
Sunken Meadow State Park
We will investigate the trails, ponds, and seashore to see what birds are leftover from the fall and which birds have arrived for the winter.
Registration: (585) 880-0915
Directions: Take Sunken Meadow State Pkwy north to end, meet in the northwest corner of field 1.

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Linnaean Society of New York
Saturday, November 16, 2019
Jamaica Bay National Wildlife Refuge
Leader: Joseph DiCostanzo
Registrar: Pearl Broder — pbroder3@nyc.rr.com or 212-924-0030
Registration opens: Monday, November 4
Ride: $15 or public transportation

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Littoral Society
Sunday, November 17, 2019, 10:00am - 12:00pm
Hike the Trails of the North Forty Natural Area
Floyd Bennett Field
Ryan Visitors Center
It’s almost winter, the perfect season for discovering the hidden secrets of the North Forty Natural Area at Floyd Bennett Field. Join American Littoral Society naturalist Gordon Lam and NYC Botanist Zihao Wang to look for flora, fauna, and maybe even a bit of history. Participants will carpool from the Ryan Visitors’ Center to the North Forty trailhead.

DIRECTIONS TO FLOYD BENNETT FIELD:
• Subway: IRT #2 to Flatbush Ave. Check Sunday train schedules ahead of time. Take the Q-35 bus south to Floyd Bennett Field, last stop before the Gil Hodges Memorial (Marine Pkwy.) Bridge.
• By Car: Belt Pkwy. to Exit 11S. Take Flatbush Ave. south to park.  Bus: B41 to Nostrand Ave. then Q35 to the park entrance.  Proceed to the Ryan Visitors’ Center to meet the group.

Zihao Wang is a botanist inspired by the local flora of NYC. He found his love for native plants while exploring the natural areas of the five boroughs. The surprisingly diverse community of rare plants hidden in the city motivated him to study field botany. He then went on to become a botanical consultant and gain a deep understanding of the ecological communities of the New York metropolitan area. He can't wait to share his passion for wild plants and explore the wonderful wilderness with more people.

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New York City Audubon
Saturday, November 16, 2019, 9am – 3pm
Van Trip to the Winter Waterfowl Workshop at Jamaica Bay
Register for our van trip to the Winter Waterfowl Workshop (see description above) and get to Jamaica bay the easy way—by passenger van! Bring lunch and water. Limited to 12. $53 (37)
Click here to register

Saturday, November 16, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Van Cortlandt Park Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 7-November 23, 9-10:30am
Guides: NYC Audubon with the Van Cortlandt Park Alliance
Meet at the southeast corner of the Mosholu Avenue park entrance. The history of birding and Van Cortlandt Park are inseparable. Influential birders such as Roger Tory Peterson and Allan D. Cruickshank got their starts on Van Cortlandt’s ecologically diverse grounds. These walks celebrate the tradition set forth by these great ornithologists. Participants will look for various species of residents and migrants and discuss a wide range of avian topics. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Sunday, November 17, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Pelham Bay Park Bird Walks
Sundays, September 8-December 8, 9-10:30am
Guide: NYC Audubon with Pelham Bay Park
September 8: Meets at Rodman’s Neck Parking Lot
September 15-December 8: Meet at Orchard Beach Parking Lot
Join us to explore some of the best birding NYC has to offer. Come discover Pelham Bay Park's diverse habitat that attracts a variety of fall migrants. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

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New York City WILD!
Sunday, November 17, 2019, 9:30am
Now Get Out: Tarrytown, NY: Rockefeller State Park Preserve

For the FULL INFORMATION ABOUT EACH WALK click HERE to take you to the Eventbrite Profile page where you will find all details (scroll down to the thumbnails) for each of the outings and how to SIGN UP !

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North Shore Audubon Society
Saturday, November 16, 2019, 9:30am – 12:00pm
Nassau County Museum of Art
Leader: Peggy - 516-883-2130
Where: Nassau County Museum of Art, One Museum Dr, Roslyn, NY 11576 (map)

Wear water-resistant footwear, bring binoculars and drinking water. Wear long pants and socks so you do not touch poison ivy.

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Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Sunday, November 17, 2019, 1:00pm-3:00pm
Acme Pond and the North Forest
Hylan Blvd and Holton Avenue, Staten Island
The woodlands and ponds of this little known area will be explored during an approximately two mile hike. Once heavily farmed, the Acme Pond area has developed into a nicely wooded forest over the past 150 years with sweetgum, white oaks and hickories as the dominant trees. The pond is reputed to be the home of large bass and provides a secluded location for many birds as well as snakes and turtles.
Meet at the corner of Hylan Boulevard, and Holton Avenue.
For more information phone Clay Wollney at (718) 869-6327.

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South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, November 17, 2019
Jones Beach Coast Guard Station Parking Area
From the Wantagh State Parkway, travel south. Upon entering Jones Beach State Park, exit at Bay Drive and continue west. Turn right (north) at entrance for Coast Guard Station and West End Boat Basin; turn right again for parking.
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


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Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, November 16, 2019
Queens Park of the Month: Kissena Corridor Park at 56th Road and 146th Street (in Kissena Corridor Park), Queens 11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
The Queens Park of the Month series features some highlights of some local favorite parks.
Free!

Birding: Owls at Pelham Bay Park, Bronx
1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.
Be wise and join this Urban Park Ranger-led hike, as we look for this bird of prey. Participants are selected by lottery. Lottery registration begins on Wednesday, November 6.
Free!
...Read more

Tuesday, November 05, 2019

Treehugger Tuesday

From the website Mother Nature Network:

Ocean Cleanup mission takes aim at rivers
Mary Jo DiLonardo
October 28, 2019, 4:04 p.m.

Boyan Slat's plastic-free dream is taking shape.

The group behind the mission to rid our oceans of plastic has opened a second front in the war by pulling plastic from the world's most polluted waterways before it gets to the ocean.

The Ocean Cleanup team unveiled a group of Interceptors, which are currently in operation on two rivers in Malaysia and Indonesia. By their estimate, roughly 80% of the world's plastic reaches the ocean through 1,000 rivers. The goal is to clean up those rivers by 2025, pulling in roughly 50,000 kilograms of plastic a day with each river Interceptor.

"To truly rid the oceans of plastic, we need to both clean up the legacy and close the tap, preventing more plastic from reaching the oceans in the first place," said founder Boyan Slat.

The river element was unveiled less than a month after the team successfully collected plastic in the ocean after a rocky few months.

The ocean element is back on track

"Our ocean cleanup system is now finally catching plastic, from one-ton ghost nets to tiny microplastics! Also, anyone missing a wheel?" announced Slat. It was a buoyant moment for a project that has had its ups and downs.

Slat became the poster boy for entrepreneurship when he quit university and launched the project at 18. He had come up with the idea after diving in Greece as a teenager, recognizing the scope of the problem — and coming up with a potential solution. He has been the face of the project ever since, through good times and bad.

The Ocean Cleanup was redeployed in June after spending four months in the shop and has been in testing mode for the last few months. The second deployment was a quieter affair than the first, when the much-lauded cleanup system began trolling the Great Pacific Garbage Patch to collect plastic waste. However, the Ocean Cleanup was forced to return to port in Hawaii just a few months after being launched because the passive floating system was catching plastic, but it wasn't necessarily retaining it and an 18-meter end section had broken away from the main frame.

Undeterred by their critics, the team behind the Ocean Cleanup said the mishap was all part of the process.

The basic principle behind the iterative design process is to test, learn, and repeat until you have a proven concept. We do not know with certainty that these proposed options will solve the issues we have encountered. In fact, there may still be further unknowns, as is the nature when doing something that has never been done before. What we do know, is that every day we are not yet operational the plastic pollution problem is not getting better.

How it works (and why it didn't before)

Ocean Cleanup is a Netherlands-based group of about 80 engineers, researchers, scientists and computational modelers. Dubbed 001/B or Wilson, it consists of a 2,000-foot (600 meter) U-shaped boom with an attached woven skirt. It acts like a floating artificial coastline. The boom prevents plastic from flowing over it, while the skirt stops debris from escaping underneath it. It's set up to collect everything from big items like massive fishing nets as well as microplastics, all without disturbing marine life below.

It was the system's finally realized ability to capture the tiniest of plastic pieces that signaled the team had rounded the corner.

"After beginning this journey seven years ago, this first year of testing in the unforgivable environment of the high seas strongly indicates that our vision is attainable and that the beginning of our mission to rid the ocean of plastic garbage, which has accumulated for decades, is within our sights," Slat said in a news release and the video above.

However, with the Ocean Cleanup's success comes a new question: If you clean up the plastic, are your endangering the health of the neuston, an ecosystem that lives at the top surface of the water? This question about the neuston — which is comprised of bacteria, protozoans, certain species of fish, jellyfish, sea anemones, vellela and crabs — has come up several times this year, as the linked story explains. In response, the Ocean Cleanup has been communicating with the biologist who originally raised the question and that they are adjusting the system and its environmental impact as they go. (There's some continued back-and-forth on Twitter on the best way to do this.)

Learning from mistakes

The bumps and ongoing adjustments are part of the process. In fact, it was the problem that sent them back to port in December that helped them solve a deeper issue. The offshore crew noticed on Dec. 29 that the section was detached and after some debate, determined that the boom must return to port because both end sections contained sensors and satellite communication had been compromised.

Late last year, the boom was struggling in places to hold on to plastic that it gathered.

"It has been four weeks since we deployed System 001 in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP). In this time, we have observed that plastic is exiting the system once it is collected, so we are currently working on causes and solutions to remedy this," Slat wrote on the group's website in late November. "Because this is our beta system, and this is the first deployment of any ocean cleanup system, we have been preparing ourselves for surprises."

"Although we are not harvesting plastic yet, based on the current results, we are positive we are close to making it work," Slat said at the time.

One reason the system didn't work as hoped has to do with speed. To catch the plastic, the system typically has to move faster — or in some cases, slower — than the plastic it's hoping to catch, Slat said. The fix put in place — one inspired by sailing — ensured that the the system will not travel at the same speed as the plastic.

There are still obstacles to be overcome and problems to be solved, but the team is making progress and building momentum as this BrightVibes video explains:
...Read more

Monday, November 04, 2019

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming birding and nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, November 9, 2019 to Sunday, November 10, 2019:

Bedford Audubon Society
August 25, 2019 through November 25, 2019, 9:00am-5:00pm
Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch
Arthur Butler Sanctuary, Bedford, NY
Spectacular flocks of Broad-winged Hawks pass through our area in mid-September, but Accipiters such as Sharp-shinned + Cooper’s Hawks provide the most consistent flight throughout the fall hawk-watching season.

Join us for Science in Action: Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch to experience the miracle of raptor migration. Our data is combined with other Hawkwatch sites to create population and migration analyses that help us better protect raptors and their habitats.

Registration not necessary.
See more details

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Brooklyn Bird Club
Saturday, November 9, 2019
Brooklyn Coast Potpourri
Leader: Heydi Lopes
Focus: open field species, late sparrows, raptors, late shorebirds, potential rarity.
Car Pool Fee: $10.00
Registrar Mike Yuan email mjyuan@gmail.com
Registration Period: Nov 2nd Nov 7th
Note: This trip’s locations will be at the discretion of the leader, depending on what’s being reported.
Please review our trip guidelines here: http://brooklynbirdclub.org/information-registration

Saturday, November 9, 2019, 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Prospect Park: Birdwatching for Beginners
Leader: Cyrus Baty
Birdwatching for Beginners meets at the Prospect Park Audubon Center at The Boathouse at 12 noon. Bring binoculars if you have them; otherwise, binoculars are available for loan.

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Eastern Long Island Audubon Society
Saturday, November 9, 2019, 8:30am
Smith Point
Leader: Byron Young
At the southern end of William Floyd Parkway, you will find Smith Point Park.
Meet on the west side of the large parking lot closest to the FINS tower.
There are usually a great many small birds hanging out by the basketball courts, birds should still be migrating as we look for both land birds and check out the ocean for any pelagic birds and winter ducks. Over 200 species have been seen here, so maybe we could have a good day. In addition to a large collection of gulls in the parking lot, which we will check for Lesser Black-backed Gulls, the parking lot features its own herd of deer. Although frowned on by the NPS, if you would like to bring them a left over Halloween pumpkin, they would surely enjoy it.

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Great South Bay Audubon Society
Saturday, November 9, 2019, 8:30am
Suffolk County Farm
350 Yaphank Avenue, Yaphank
Leader(s): Vera Capogna (516-639-5430) and John Gluth (631-827-0120)
Take Sunrise Highway to exit 57N, Horseblock Rd. Bear right onto County Road 21, Yaphank Ave. Travel approximately one mile to the Cornell Cooperative Extension on left. Turn left onto the entrance road. Take your first right and follow down and meet at the visitors parking area on your left

(Nature walks will be cancelled if it is raining or snowing.)

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Linnaean Society of New York
Saturday, November 9, 2019
Prospect Park, Bartel Pritchard Park Entrance
Leader: Roberta Manian
Registrar: Mary Beth Kooper — marybeth@nyc.rr.com
Registration opens: Monday, October 28
Public transportation

Sunday, November 10, 2019
Croton Point Park
Leader: Paul Keim
Registrar: Miriam Rakowski — miriamrakowski@hotmail.com or 212-749-7376
Registration opens: Monday, October 28
Public transportation

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New York City Audubon
Saturday, November 9, 2019, 7am – 7pm
Hawk Mountain, PA
Guides: Tod Winston, Hawk Mountain Education Specialist
Visit Hawk Mountain at the peak migration time for raptors such as Golden Eagles, Rough-legged Hawks, and Northern Goshawks. We'll also enjoy an orientation from a Hawk Mountain docent and seek out wintering finches and other songbirds at the Visitor Center's feeder station. The path to the hawk watch site is a .75-mile hike through mountainous woodland.
Bring lunch. Group program, trail admission, and transportation by van included. Limited to 12. $139 (97)
Click here to register

Saturday, November 9, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Van Cortlandt Park Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 7-November 23, 9-10:30am
Guides: NYC Audubon with the Van Cortlandt Park Alliance
Meet at the southeast corner of the Mosholu Avenue park entrance. The history of birding and Van Cortlandt Park are inseparable. Influential birders such as Roger Tory Peterson and Allan D. Cruickshank got their starts on Van Cortlandt’s ecologically diverse grounds. These walks celebrate the tradition set forth by these great ornithologists. Participants will look for various species of residents and migrants and discuss a wide range of avian topics. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Sunday, November 10, 2019, 9:30am – 7:00pm
Snow Geese and Tundra Swans of Brigantine, NJ
Guide: Joe Giunta, Happy Warblers LLC
Brigantine, part of the National Wildlife Refuge System, is one of the East Coast's premier sites for waterbirds, offering a diversity of species and panoramic views. Bring lunch and water. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $125 (87)
Click here to register

Sunday, November 10, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Pelham Bay Park Bird Walks
Sundays, September 8-December 8, 9-10:30am
Guide: NYC Audubon with Pelham Bay Park
September 8: Meets at Rodman’s Neck Parking Lot
September 15-December 8: Meet at Orchard Beach Parking Lot
Join us to explore some of the best birding NYC has to offer. Come discover Pelham Bay Park's diverse habitat that attracts a variety of fall migrants. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Sunday, November 10, 2019, 9:30am – 11:30am
Birding at Wave Hill
Sundays, September 8, October 13, November 10
Guide: Gabriel Willow with Wave Hill
Naturalist Gabriel Willow contributes his extensive knowledge of bird species and their behaviors on these captivating walks. Wave Hill’s garden setting overlooking the Hudson River flyway provides the perfect habitat for resident and migrating birds. Ages 10 and up welcome with an adult. Limited to 20 per walk. NYC Audubon members enjoy two-for-one admission (see www.wavehill.org for more information).

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

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New York City WILD!
Saturday, November 9, 2019, 8:00am
Now Get Out: Poughkeepsie Two Bridges Walk

Sunday, November 10, 2019, 10:00am
Now Get Out: Croton Aqueduct Trail: Croton Dam to Ossining, NY

For the FULL INFORMATION ABOUT EACH WALK click HERE to take you to the Eventbrite Profile page where you will find all details (scroll down to the thumbnails) for each of the outings and how to SIGN UP !

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North Shore Audubon Society
Saturday, November 9, 2019, 9:30am – 12:00pm
Point Lookout and Lido Preserve - leaderless walk
Where: 40.588320, -73.584722 (map)
Meet in the southeast corner of the parking lot for Point Lookout Town Park. The lot is due south of the last exit of Loop Pkwy.
Wear water-resistant footwear, bring binoculars and drinking water. Wear long pants and socks so you do not touch poison ivy.

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Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Saturday, November 9, 2019, 12:00pm-2:00pm
High Rock Park and Pouch Camp
200 Nevada Avenue, Staten Island
Join Ray Matarazzo for a fall foliage hike to Stump Pond. Investigate this unique corner of the Greenbelt with one of Staten Island’s finest environmental educators. The walk will focus on the identification of trees, some of the most colorful species, Hickory, Maple, Sweetgum and Tupelo.
Participants will meet in the parking lot at 200 Nevada Avenue.
For more information call Ray Matarazzo at (718) 317-7666.

Sunday, November 10, 2019, 1:00pm-3:00pm
Bloomingdale Park
Maguire Avenue and Ramona Avenue, Staten Island
Fifty years ago the area now known as Bloomingdale Park was sandy pine-oak woodlands littered with everything imaginable, including burnt out stolen cars and trash cans. A hike today through the woodlands of Bloomingdale Park will reveal the effects of a half century of time and human intervention. Participants will observe the power of nature to reclaim the woods from damage wrought by humans.
Meet at the corner of Maguire Avenue and Ramona Avenue.
For more information phone Clay Wollney at (718) 869-6327.

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South Shore Audubon Society
November 10, 2019
Mill Pond Park
Use street parking on the westbound side of Merrick Road. The park is four blocks west of the Wantagh State Parkway.
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


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Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, November 9, 2019
Wings Over Wave Hill Weekend at Wave Hill, Bronx
9:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
This Veteran’s Day weekend, spend a day or two—or three—enjoying a plethora of activities devoted to birds both big and small.

Sunday, November 10, 2019
Wings Over Wave Hill Weekend at Wave Hill, Bronx
9:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
This Veteran’s Day weekend, spend a day or two—or three—enjoying a plethora of activities devoted to birds both big and small.

Flora and Fauna Walk of Highbridge Park with Tod Winston at W 158th Street and Edgecombe Avenue (in Highbridge Park), Manhattan
10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
Come on a morning nature walk through Highbridge Park, an ideal spot to see many species of animals, insects, and birds.
Free!
...Read more

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Treehugger Tuesday

From the website Earther:

Switching to Renewables May Spur Trillions Dollars Worth of Benefits in US
Yessenia Funes
October 29, 2019

The costs of installing renewable energy are far outweighed by the health benefits they would unlock, according to a new study. Those benefits could add up to upwards of $2.2 trillion.

Published in the journal Environmental Research Letters on Tuesday, the study looks at how transitioning away from fossil fuels—which spew nasty junk such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxides, and particulate matter in addition to carbon pollution—would benefit the economy by reducing the health burdens communities face due to this dirty energy. The authors analyzed the current use of coal, oil, and gas by region while examining what type of renewable would produce the best benefits there.

The total benefits, which include both climate and health, ranged from $1.7 million to $2.2 trillion depending on the region. The range is so wide because some regions saw dramatically higher benefits as they depend on much dirtier forms of energy. There are also, however, different values associated with benefits that can vary depending on how much we expect this reduction in pollution to benefit people.

The model built by the authors—who hail from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Carnegie Mellon—uses other already-existing models to simulate where renewable energy infrastructure would displace power plants and their accompanying emissions in 10 regions of the U.S. The researchers also estimate the climate benefits from this transition by measuring the reduction in carbon emissions using the social cost of carbon, a metric which looks at climate change impacts such as displacement and the spread of infectious disease and puts a price on them.

“When you include health, the cost-effectiveness equation completely changes,” lead author Jonathan Buonocore, a research associate at Harvard, told Earther. “In most areas of the country, if health is included, deploying renewable energy ends up being more cost-effective than installing carbon capture on a coal plant.”

The benefits vary by region. For example, installing 100 megawatts of wind in California could result in $4.2 million in benefits. That’s because installing rooftop solar, utility solar, and wind turbines would decrease the state’s gas production, as well as its emissions from burning biomass. However, California saw among the lowest benefits for its renewables—between $1.7 million and $4.2 million a year. That’s because other parts of the U.S. rely on energy that’s much dirty.

Take a look at regions in the eastern U.S., for instance. Due to the continuing reliance of coal in eastern regions, the health benefits were estimated to be the highest there, especially around the Great Lakes. Coal emits the most pollution, so removing it adds some of the best health benefits for communities.

And this study is likely a serious underestimate. While the authors estimate the reduced risk of dying due to the decreased pollution, they don’t include any data on the reduction to emergency room visits or other health benefits that would result from such a shift. We already know climate change is taking a toll and costing billions. They also don’t conduct any life cycle assessments for the energy infrastructure, which may add increased benefits as this would include the extraction of fossil fuels. Another big missing source of benefits is tied to methane leakage from gas infrastructure. That alone can increase benefits by 36 percent, according to the study.

As the world comes to terms with the work required to save the planet and protect public health in light of the climate crisis, leaders need to pay special attention to energy. This study shows that the cost of energy, in particular, needs some re-assessing. If health costs and benefits were considered as part of the actual price of energy, renewables could compete with fossil fuels (even without doing that, they already are in many places). Then, perhaps, officials would stop complaining about the economics of climate change and just hurry up and fix this mess.
...Read more

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming birding and nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, November 2, 2019 to Sunday, November 3, 2019:

Bedford Audubon Society
August 25, 2019 through November 25, 2019, 9:00am-5:00pm
Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch
Arthur Butler Sanctuary, Bedford, NY
Spectacular flocks of Broad-winged Hawks pass through our area in mid-September, but Accipiters such as Sharp-shinned + Cooper’s Hawks provide the most consistent flight throughout the fall hawk-watching season.

Join us for Science in Action: Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch to experience the miracle of raptor migration. Our data is combined with other Hawkwatch sites to create population and migration analyses that help us better protect raptors and their habitats.

Registration not necessary.
See more details

**********

Brooklyn Bird Club
Saturday, November 2, 2019, 7:15am - 12:00pm
Fall Birding in Prospect Park
Leader: Ed Crowne
Focus: late songbirds, typical late fall migrants; the beginning of winter migratory species, potential rarity
Meet 7:15 am at Bartel Pritchard park entrance, no registration required.
Please review our trip guidelines here: http://brooklynbirdclub.org/information-registration

Saturday, November 2, 2019, 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Prospect Park: Birdwatching for Beginners
Leader: Cyrus Baty
Birdwatching for Beginners meets at the Prospect Park Audubon Center at The Boathouse at 12 noon. Bring binoculars if you have them; otherwise, binoculars are available for loan.

Sunday, November 3, 2019, 8:00am - 11:00am
Prospect Park First Sunday Walk
Meets at the Prospect Park Audubon Center at The Boathouse, the first Sunday of every month except July and August. Leaders are members of the Brooklyn Bird Club.
Bring binoculars.
Note: Meets at 8 a.m. except in the winter months of December, January, and February when the walk starts at 10 a.m.

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Gateway National Park
Saturday, November 2, 2019, 5:00pm — 6:30 pm
Jr. Ranger Evening Owl Prowl
View Details

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Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, November 3, 2019, 6:30am - 8:00am
Birding in Peace
Before our gates open to the general public, birding expert Rob Jett leads these peaceful Sunday morning walking tours to discover the birds that make Green-Wood their home – at least temporarily.

By September, offspring of these nesting birds will be on their own. Returning warblers will be in their less flamboyant fall plumage. Large numbers of blackbirds, flycatchers, sparrows, vireos, and swallows will also be passing through. By October, waterfowl are returning, and we’ll look for raptors heading south. November will bring back our overwintering feathered denizens from the north.

All walks are at a slow pace on easy to moderate terrain, but proper, close toed footwear is suggested.
$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members
Click here for our inclement weather policy.


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Linnaean Society of New York
Sunday, November 3, 2019
State Line Hawk Watch, New Jersey
Leader: Pieter Prall
Registrar: Sandra Maury — sandramaury39@gmail.com or 212-874-4881
Registration opens: Monday, October 21
Ride: $15

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New York City Audubon
Saturday, November 2, 2019, 8am – 3pm
Beginning Birding Field Trip
Classes: Wednesdays, October 16-30, 6:30-8:30pm
Trips: Saturdays, October 26, 8-11am, and November 2, 8am-3pm
Instructor: Tod Winston
Learn the keys to identifying the spectacular variety of birds that migrate southwards through New York City every fall. Even if you've never picked up a pair of binoculars, you’ll soon be identifying warblers, thrushes, waterbirds, and more—both by sight and by ear. Three fun and educational in-class sessions and two field trips to Central Park and Jamaica Bay (transport to Jamaica Bay included). Limited to 12. $179 (125)
Click here to register

Saturday, November 2, 2019, 9am – 3pm
Ducks, Raptors and More at Pelham Bay Park
Guide: Gabriel Willow
Come explore the lovely coves and rocky outcroppings of Pelham Bay Park as we look for wintering ducks, migrating raptors, and more. Pelham Bay Park's combination of open water, saltmarsh, rocky shore, both young- and old-growth forest, rare coastal tall grass meadows, and patches of dry and wet oak savanna are not just unique within the city, but also on this continent. Bring lunch and water. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $97 (68)
Click here to register

Saturday, November 2, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Van Cortlandt Park Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 7-November 23, 9-10:30am
Guides: NYC Audubon with the Van Cortlandt Park Alliance
Meet at the southeast corner of the Mosholu Avenue park entrance. The history of birding and Van Cortlandt Park are inseparable. Influential birders such as Roger Tory Peterson and Allan D. Cruickshank got their starts on Van Cortlandt’s ecologically diverse grounds. These walks celebrate the tradition set forth by these great ornithologists. Participants will look for various species of residents and migrants and discuss a wide range of avian topics. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Sunday, November 3, 2019, 9:30am – 10:30am
Queens Botanical Garden Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 14 and October 26,
Sundays, October 6, October 20, and November 3, 9:30-10:30am
Guide: Corey Finger with Queens Botanical Garden
Explore Queens Botanical Garden in search of migrant songbirds and learn about the valuable resources that the Garden offers birds and other wildlife. Binoculars available. Register for one date or the whole series of five walks (walk-ins welcome). Email info@queensbotanical.org or visit www.queensbotanical.org/calendar to register. Limited to 25 per walk. Free (with Garden admission)

Sunday, November 3, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Pelham Bay Park Bird Walks
Sundays, September 8-December 8, 9-10:30am
Guide: NYC Audubon with Pelham Bay Park
September 8: Meets at Rodman’s Neck Parking Lot
September 15-December 8: Meet at Orchard Beach Parking Lot
Join us to explore some of the best birding NYC has to offer. Come discover Pelham Bay Park's diverse habitat that attracts a variety of fall migrants. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

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North Shore Audubon Society
Saturday, November 2, 2019, 9:30am – 12:00pm
Upper Francis Pond - Shelly (map)
After Upper Francis, we will drive to Bailey Arboretum at 194 Bayville Rd, Locust Valley, NY.

Please inform walk leader that you are attending.
See "Walk Locations" for directions.
Wear water-resistant footwear, bring binoculars and drinking water. Wear long pants and socks so you do not touch poison ivy.


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Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Sunday, November 3, 2019, 9:15pm-3:15pm
The Richard Buegler Fall 10-Mile Greenbelt Walk
Rockland Avenue and Brielle Avenue, Staten Island
The Richard Buegler Fall 10-Mile Greenbelt Walk—The Fall 10-miler begins at the Greenbelt Nature Center, winds its way through LaTourette Park before returning to the Nature Center. Participants will explore the heart of Staten Island while enjoying an invigorating loop hike in the Greenbelt with Protectors. An autumnal walk through the colorful woodlands of the Greenbelt with Protectors allows inquisitive visitors to experience local wildlife while gaining knowledge of the natural world. We will meet in the Nature Center parking lot at the corner of Rockland and Brielle Avenues.
For more information call Dominick Durso at (917) 478-7607.

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Queens County Bird Club
Saturday, November 2, 2019, 8:00am – 3:00pm
South Shore Potpourri
Leader: Ian Resnick (917) 626-9562
Where: 2352 Windsor Rd, Baldwin, NY 11510 (map)
Explore various duck ponds of the South Shore, starting with Lofts Pond in Baldwin - see map for this location - and heading east to Milburn Creek, Cow Meadow, Cammanns Pond, Mill Pond Park Bellmore, and any other nearby locations that have reported interesting sightings on that day. Meet at the southwest corner of Loft's Pond Park. Park on-street near the map address.
Lunch break: We usually stop at a pizzeria or pitaria for lunch.

Non members are welcome on our trips and we would appreciate a nominal $5 (or more!) voluntary donation for non-member participation. We prefer if you offer instead of being asked.
All persons (member or not) are required to offer contribution if they get a ride with another.
All persons are requested to Notify the leader at least 2 days in advance if they want to go on a trip.
Be on time. We depart promptly.


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South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, November 3, 2019
Massapequa Preserve
From Sunrise Highway, turn north onto Broadway, Massapequa. Travel under the Long Island Rail Road overpass, then make the first right onto Veterans Boulevard (headed east). Go past the Massapequa train station and into the parking lot at the east end of the station. The preserve is directly east of the parking lot.
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


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Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, November 2, 2019
The New York City Naturalist Club: Fall Migration at Isham Street and Seaman Avenue (in Inwood Hill Park), Manhattan
10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
Our Urban Park Rangers will guide you to the best wildlife viewing spots in the urban jungle.
Free!

Ecosystem Explorers: Critters of the Night at Comfort station (in Willowbrook Park), Staten Island
6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.
Be an explorer with the Urban Park Rangers as we venture into habitats that exist in New York City parks!
Free!

Sunday, November 3, 2019
Audubon Bird Walk at Queens Botanical Garden, Queens
9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
Register for one or all five free nature walks in this special series with NYC Audubon! Spot and identify creatures of flight and learn how QBG provides important resources for birds.
Free!

Queens Park of the Month: Kissena Corridor Park at 56th Road and 146th Street (in Kissena Corridor Park), Queens
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
The Queens Park of the Month series features some highlights of some local favorite parks.
Free!
...Read more

Saturday, October 26, 2019

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, October 25, 2019:

-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Oct. 25, 2019
* NYNY1910.25

- Birds Mentioned
SAY’S PHOEBE+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

EURASIAN WIGEON
HARLEQUIN DUCK
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
BROWN PELICAN
American Bittern
Virginia Rail
AMERICAN AVOCET
American Oystercatcher
“Western” Willet
HUDSONIAN GODWIT
MARBLED GODWIT
Red Knot
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
American Woodcock
Parasitic Jaeger
Caspian Tern
Royal Tern
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
American Pipit
YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT
Bobolink
Eastern Meadowlark
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW
Vesper Sparrow
LARK SPARROW
Grasshopper Sparrow
Nelson’s Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sparrow
Ovenbird
Northern Waterthrush
Black-and-white Warbler
Tennessee Warbler
Orange-crowned Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Mourning Warbler
Cape May Warbler
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
BLUE GROSBEAK
DICKCISSEL

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, October 25, 2019 at 9:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are both BROWN and AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS, a good Saturday flight day, including a report of a SAY’S PHOEBE, EURASIAN WIGEON and HARLEQUIN DUCK, AMERICAN AVOCET, MARBLED and HUDSONIAN GODWITS, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER, LARK and CLAY-COLORED SPARROWS, YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, DICKCISSEL, BLUE GROSBEAK and much more.

Both PELICANS seen locally again this week featured a BROWN PELICAN photographed last Saturday on the west jetty at the entrance to Montauk Harbor and an AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN visiting the East Pond at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge from Monday through today, appearing near the Raunt today off the Big John’s Pond overlook after spending most of the week on the pond’s north end.

A strong coastal flight last Saturday, dominated by YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS, did produce good numbers of incoming sparrows and a variety of mostly departing species plus an intriguing report of a fly-by flycatcher at Jones Beach West End that was thought by the observer to be a SAY’S PHOEBE – unfortunately, rather than lingering to be photographed, the bird apparently just continued west.

As waterfowl numbers and variety continue to build, a drake HARLEQUIN DUCK appeared Monday out at Orient Point and a EURASIAN WIGEON was still being seen on Jamaica Bay’s East Pond at least to Tuesday. Also on the East Pond, 2 AMERICAN AVOCETS were present today, with 1 there most of the week. Other shorebirds included 5 LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS on the East Pond and, out in Jamaica Bay, an HUDSONIAN GODWIT photographed as it flew by south of the West Pond, both on Sunday.

Today on Staten Island 3 AMERICAN AVOCETS were spotted later in the afternoon at Miller Field.

Four MARBLED GODWITS were still hanging out with over 200 AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHERS and other shorebirds at Jones Beach West End on the Coast Guard island yesterday, and 7 LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS were counted today at their roost on Santapogue Creek in West Babylon. A “WESTERN” WILLET, a RED KNOT and a SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER were among the shorebirds on the Point Lookout wharf at the West Marina boat basin Sunday.

Two CASPIAN TERNS were still at Jones Beach West End last weekend, while the continuing ROYAL TERNS featured 42 on the beach at Jones Beach Field 6 last Sunday; these were part of a large gathering of gulls and terns both off Field 6 and off Robert Moses State Park on Sunday, providing a nice opportunity for marauding PARASITIC JAEGERS, with at least 15 noted off Moses Park and at least 7 off Jones Field 6.

Single RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were spotted at Floyd Bennet Field Saturday and in Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn Wednesday.

An adult LARK SPARROW at Nickerson Beach Sunday was followed by 1 in Central Park’s north end on Tuesday and Wednesday, and a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was east of the entrance booth to Jones Beach West End Saturday.

A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was seen in Greenwood Cemetery Saturday and Thursday, and a SALTMARSH SPARROW in Manhattan’s Union Square Park today was joined by a MOURNING WARBLER.

A DICKCISSEL was at Jones Beach West End Saturday, while a BLUE GROSBEAK visited Greenwood Cemetery Sunday to Wednesday.

A YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT at Central Park’s north end Sunday followed 1 at Montauk Point last Saturday.

Other notable migrants during the week included YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, VIRGINIA RAIL, AMERICAN WOODCOCK, AMERICAN BITTERN, AMERICAN PIPIT, VESPER SPARROW, with 2 in Prospect Park to today, NELSON’S SPARROW, BOBOLINK and EASTERN MEADOWLARK.

Single ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS were noted Saturday on Long Island at Robert Moses State Park and on the North Fork.

A decent variety of late WARBLERS this week did include1 or more each of OVENBIRD, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, BLACK-AND-WHITE, TENNESSEE, NASHVILLE, NORTHERN PARULA, BLACK-THROATEDS BLUE and GREEN, CAPE MAY, CHESTNUT-SIDED, PRAIRIE and others.

To phone in reports please call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Treehugger Tuesday

From the website Earther:

The Potential of Green Urban Planning for Mental Health
by Robin George Andrews
Friday 10:50AM

There is no single solution to the world-wide epidemic of poor mental health; addressing its root causes—like poverty-triggered stress and social isolation—and choosing effective treatment for sufferers remains paramount. One way to potentially partly buffer against the effects of poor mental health is through contact with nature, including the green spaces within metropolises.

This is an emerging area of research with plenty of unanswered questions attached, but there is a not-insignificant number of studies pointing to this being a measurable, important effect.

“Green space is an agent of public health, one that can build and sustain mental wellbeing,” Jenny Roe, an environmental psychologist at the University of Virginia, told Earther.

That’s why she’s part of a team that wants to not just quantify the effect that natural spaces have on mental health, but to also frame it in a way that forms part of designs for cities.

Neighborhood architects, engineers, and policymakers look at all kinds of factors and needs when building a city, including transportation links, housing, aesthetics, amenities, and so forth. Natural spaces are also considered, for their aesthetic, recreational, and ecological benefits. A study published in July in Science Advances outlines a model that will let policymakers see nature’s impacts on psychological wellbeing in much the same way.

The relationship between nature, mental health, and general psychological well being is still tenuous but a subject of much research, and for now, the framework designed to encapsulate these connections is merely a concept. But if the benefits of green spaces on mental health become clearer over time, then this framework certainly has potential.

“Any work that can help to better inform the people who are really designing the cities of the future is really welcome,” Russell Galt, the Director of the Urban Alliance, told Earther...

Read the entire article here.

Monday, October 21, 2019

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming birding and nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, October 26, 2019 to Sunday, October 27, 2019:

Bedford Audubon Society
August 25, 2019 through November 25, 2019, 9:00am-5:00pm
Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch
Arthur Butler Sanctuary, Bedford, NY
Spectacular flocks of Broad-winged Hawks pass through our area in mid-September, but Accipiters such as Sharp-shinned + Cooper’s Hawks provide the most consistent flight throughout the fall hawk-watching season.

Join us for Science in Action: Chestnut Ridge Hawkwatch to experience the miracle of raptor migration. Our data is combined with other Hawkwatch sites to create population and migration analyses that help us better protect raptors and their habitats.

Registration not necessary.
See more details

Saturday, October 26, 2019, 8:00am - 10:00am
John Jay Homestead
400 Jay St, Katonah, NY 10536
Come “Jay Walking” with us… you’re sure to see more than jays this fall!

In partnership with Friends of John Jay Homestead. Naturalist Tait Johansson will lead you on a Bird Walk at the beautiful John Jay Homestead in Katonah. The woods, fields and shrublands of this State Historic Site should hold many migrant landbirds on this prime date for fall migration!
Meet at the main parking lot. Cost: Free. Level of difficulty: Easy-Moderate. Please register with Susan at info@bedfordaudubon.org or 914-302-9713.
See more details

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Brooklyn Bird Club
Saturday, October 26, 2019
Hawk watching at Wildcat Ridge Wildlife Management Area
Leader: Peter Dorosh
Focus: Hawk watching diversity at a new debut location
Car Pool Fee: $25.00
Registrar Peter Dorosh Prosbird@aol.com (or backup Prosbird@gmail.com)
Registration Period: Oct 19th – Oct 24th
Note: This trip will require a 1-mile uphill hike and then birding at a stationary site. Please refer to the site description, below.
Site Profile: http://www.wcrhawkwatch.com/kiosk.html ; https://www.nynjtc.org/hike/hawk-watch-wildcat-ridge-wildlife-management-area
Please review our trip guidelines here: http://brooklynbirdclub.org/information-registration

Saturday, October 26, 2019, 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Prospect Park: Birdwatching for Beginners
Leader: Cyrus Baty
Birdwatching for Beginners meets at the Prospect Park Audubon Center at The Boathouse at 12 noon. Bring binoculars if you have them; otherwise, binoculars are available for loan.

Sunday, October 27, 2019, 9:00am - 10:00am
Fort Greene Park, North Brooklyn
Meet 9 am at the Urban Park Rangers Visitors Center https://tinyurl.com/FtGreeneVCtr
Leader: August Davidson-Onsgard AugustDavidsonOnsgard.com
Focus: Fall migration of songbirds at a historical park.
No registration necessary.
Nearest train stations: DeKalb Avenue station; exit and walk 5 blocks east on DeKalb Avenue; Also Fulton Ave A and G lines, walk north on South Portland Ave
Site references: https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/fort-greene-park ; https://tinyurl.com/FTGreeneMaylist

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Feminist Bird Club
Sunday, October 27, 2019
Governors Island

All walks follow the ABA Code of Birding Ethics

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Gateway National Park
Saturday, October 26, 2019, 10:00am — 11:00am
Birding for Beginners
View Details

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Linnaean Society of New York
Saturday, October 26, 2019
Floyd Bennett Field
Leader: Rob Jett
Registrar: Gabe Cunningham — gabecunningham@gmail.com
Registration opens: Monday, October 14 Public transportation

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Littoral Society of New York
Sunday, October 27, 2019, 10:00am - 1:00pm
Dead Horse Bay, New York’s Best Kept Secret Ecosystem
Floyd Bennett Field
Main Entrance Ranger Station
Hike the trails and shoreline at Dead Horse Bay with Gordon Lam, American Littoral Society naturalist and NYC Botanist, Zihao Wang. Explore the nature and fascinating history of this little known area, a living museum of the 1950s.  Warning: This is a hazardous area, teeming with broken glass and metal fragments. It is not an appropriate site for small children, carriages, or wheelchairs.  Sturdy, protective footwear is essential.  Having said this, we must comment that it is one of the most exciting and fascinating “beaches” in New York City.

DIRECTIONS TO D.H.B:
Subway: IRT #2 to Flatbush Ave.  Check Sunday train schedules ahead of time. Q-35 bus south to Floyd Bennett Field, last bus stop before the Gil Hodges Memorial (Marine Pkwy.) Bridge.

Car: Belt Pkwy. to Exit 11S. Take Flatbush Ave. south to the park. 

Bus: B41 to Nostrand Ave. then Q35 to the park entrance on your left. Meet the group at the parking lot near the small contact station and walk across Flatbush Ave. to D.H.B. trailhead.

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New York City Audubon
Saturday, October 26, 2019, 8am – 11am
Beginning Birding Field Trip
Classes: Wednesdays, October 16-30, 6:30-8:30pm
Trips: Saturdays, October 26, 8-11am, and November 2, 8am-3pm
Instructor: Tod Winston
Learn the keys to identifying the spectacular variety of birds that migrate southwards through New York City every fall. Even if you've never picked up a pair of binoculars, you’ll soon be identifying warblers, thrushes, waterbirds, and more—both by sight and by ear. Three fun and educational in-class sessions and two field trips to Central Park and Jamaica Bay (transport to Jamaica Bay included). Limited to 12. $179 (125)
Click here to register

Saturday, October 26, 2019, 9am – 2pm
Fall Migration on Randall's Island
Guides: Gabriel Willow, Christopher Girgenti with Randall's Island Park Alliance
Join us for a trip to Randall's Island, an under-explored location in the East River that hosts restored freshwater wetlands and saltmarsh. We'll look for fall migrants as we explore the results of recent restoration efforts. Two miles of walking and some modest climbs. Limited to 20. $36 (25)
Click here to register

Saturday, October 26, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Van Cortlandt Park Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 7-November 23, 9-10:30am
Guides: NYC Audubon with the Van Cortlandt Park Alliance
Meet at the southeast corner of the Mosholu Avenue park entrance. The history of birding and Van Cortlandt Park are inseparable. Influential birders such as Roger Tory Peterson and Allan D. Cruickshank got their starts on Van Cortlandt’s ecologically diverse grounds. These walks celebrate the tradition set forth by these great ornithologists. Participants will look for various species of residents and migrants and discuss a wide range of avian topics. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Saturday, October 26, 2019, 9:30am – 10:30am
Queens Botanical Garden Bird Walks
Saturdays, September 14 and October 26,
Sundays, October 6, October 20, and November 3, 9:30-10:30am
Guide: Corey Finger with Queens Botanical Garden
Explore Queens Botanical Garden in search of migrant songbirds and learn about the valuable resources that the Garden offers birds and other wildlife. Binoculars available. Register for one date or the whole series of five walks (walk-ins welcome). Email info@queensbotanical.org or visit www.queensbotanical.org/calendar to register. Limited to 25 per walk. Free (with Garden admission)

Sunday, October 27, 2019, 9am – 12pm
Sparrow ID Workshop Field Trip
Thursday, October 24, 7-8:30pm (class); Sunday, October 27, 9am-noon (trip)
Instructor: Gabriel Willow
Sparrows are one of the most challenging groups of birds to identify, yet beautiful and fascinating once they can be distinguished. Learn to identify those LBJs (little brown jobs) by studying behavior, field marks, and songs. Sparrow species seen in prior years include Field, Swamp, Savannah, White-crowned, and Lincoln's. Limited to 12. $65 (45)
Click here to register

Sunday, October 27, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Pelham Bay Park Bird Walks
Sundays, September 8-December 8, 9-10:30am
Guide: NYC Audubon with Pelham Bay Park
September 8: Meets at Rodman’s Neck Parking Lot
September 15-December 8: Meet at Orchard Beach Parking Lot
Join us to explore some of the best birding NYC has to offer. Come discover Pelham Bay Park's diverse habitat that attracts a variety of fall migrants. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

**********

North Shore Audubon Society
Saturday, October 26, 2019, 8am – 12pm
APEC
Leader: Stephane (516) 423-0947
Alley Pond Environmental Center, 22806 Northern Blvd, Little Neck, NY 11362, USA (map)

Please inform walk leader that you are attending.
See "Walk Locations" for directions.
Wear water-resistant footwear, bring binoculars and drinking water. Wear long pants and socks so you do not touch poison ivy.


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New York City WILD!
Saturday, October 26, 2019, 8:30am
Now Get Out: Bear Mountain Fall Foliage Cruise
(Extra $)

For the FULL INFORMATION ABOUT EACH WALK click HERE to take you to the Eventbrite Profile page where you will find all details (scroll down to the thumbnails) for each of the outings and how to SIGN UP !

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Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Saturday, October 26, 2019, 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Brookfield Park
575 Arthur Kill Road, Staten Island
Join Protectors of Pine Oak Woods for a natural history tour of Staten Island’s newest open space park. We will view numerous salt creeks, freshwater wetlands, grasslands and beautiful scenery; a must for hawk watching. Brookfield Park stretches along the southeastern banks of Richmond Creek and runs from Richmond Avenue to Richmondtown.
Meet in the main parking lot at 575 Arthur Kill Road, just north of Armstrong Avenue.
For more information contact Ray Matarazzo at (718) 317-7666.

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Queens County Bird Club
Saturday, Oct 26, 2019
Hawk Mountain
Leader: Bob D. (848) 468-7207
Where: Clinton Station Diner, 2 Bank St, Clinton, NJ 08809 (map)
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary is a 2.5 to 3 hour drive from eastern Queens. Contact trip leader or assistant for carpool info and other questions. The map link is to the diner, where we will have breakfast and convoy to Hawk Mountain.

Hawk Mountain is one of the top hawk watch locations in North America, certainly the premiere Fall hawk watch in the Northeast. Located on the Kittatiny Ridge west of the Delaware Water Gap, Hawk Mountain Sanctuary protects 2,600 acres of the ridge and provides excellent viewing of migrating hawks as well as fall passerines.

Late October produces peak numbers of harriers and buteos, except for Broad-winged Hawks, which are notoriously early migrants. We also stand the best chance of seeing Golden Eagle and this time is also the sweet spot for accipiters, possibly even Goshawk.

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary is an organized non-profit operation with an established visitor center and miles of marked trails, including a portion of the Appalachian Trail. The ascent to the hawk watch is a manageable uphill walk of about a mile, a 30- to 45-minute climb. There is also an admission charge: $10 for adults; $7 for seniors.

We'll assemble as a group at 8 AM at a breakfast stop, Clinton Station Diner, in Clinton, NJ, about an hour-and-a-half from Queens. From there it’s another hour and 15 minutes to Hawk Mountain. Take I-78 west in NJ to Exit 13 and bear right at every turn to the diner. The diner is a rail car visible from the Interstate.

If you want to go directly to the hawk watch, contact me and I’ll provide those directions.
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, 1700 Hawk Mountain Rd, Kempton, PA 19529

If we get fair weather that day with favorable Northwest winds, we stand a chance of having a very productive outing.

Non members are welcome on our trips and we would appreciate a nominal $5 (or more!) voluntary donation for non-member participation. We prefer if you offer instead of being asked.
All persons (member or not) are required to offer contribution if they get a ride with another.
All persons are requested to Notify the leader at least 2 days in advance if they want to go on a trip.
Be on time. We depart promptly.


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South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, October 27, 2019
Jones Beach Coast Guard Station Parking Area
From the Wantagh State Parkway, travel south. Upon entering Jones Beach State Park, exit at Bay Drive and continue west. Turn right (north) at entrance for Coast Guard Station and West End Boat Basin; turn right again for parking.
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


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Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, October 26, 2019
Audubon Bird Walk at Queens Botanical Garden, Queens
9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
Spot and identify creatures of flight and learn how QBG provides important resources for birds.
...Read more

Saturday, October 19, 2019

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, October 18, 2019:

-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Oct. 18, 2019
* NYNY1910.18

- Birds Mentioned

VARIED THRUSH+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Brant
King Eider
AMERICAN AVOCET
MARBLED GODWIT
Stilt Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Long-billed Dowitcher
POMARINE JAEGER
Parasitic Jaeger
BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE
Caspian Tern
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
BROWN PELICAN
American Bittern
WESTERN KINGBIRD
American Robin
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW
Vesper Sparrow
LARK SPARROW
Grasshopper Sparrow
Nelson’s Sparrow
Yellow-breasted Chat
Orange-crowned Warbler
Connecticut Warbler
Hooded Warbler
BLUE GROSBEAK
DICKCISSEL

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, October 18, 2019 at 9:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are VARIED THRUSH, BROWN PELICAN, AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN, WESTERN KINGBIRD, POMARINE JAEGER, AMERICAN AVOCET, MARBLED GODWIT, BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE, CLAY-COLORED and LARK SPARROWS, BLUE GROSBEAK, DICKCISSEL and more.

Another week of less than ideal conditions did today provide a nice surprise when a male VARIED THRUSH was spotted at the Alley Pond Environmental Center in Queens. The bird, feeding with American Robins, was seen briefly but disappeared along the trail that goes south from the parking lot along the boardwalk that leads to the observation platform. The entrance to APEC is off Northern Boulevard just east of the Cross Island Parkway.

An interesting incursion of BROWN PELICANS last Sunday included 15 seen moving east past Staten Island’s Huguenot Avenue Beach in the afternoon, after 3 were seen earlier off Franklin D. Roosevelt Beach in Ocean Breeze. Other Sunday sightings featured 1 off Fort Tilden, 3 off Brooklyn’s Coney Island Beach and 1 going west by Jones Beach West End. Monday provided 1 further east off Dune Road east of Triton Lane followed Tuesday by 1 moving by Mecox Bay.

There was also a report of an AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN visiting Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge’s West Pond for a while on Wednesday.

A WESTERN KINGBIRD found last Sunday at West Meadow Beach in Stony Brook was not reported there after Tuesday.

A sea watch off Riis Park last Wednesday recorded a POMARINE JAEGER along with 2 PARASITIC and 2 unidentified JAEGERS as well as an immature BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE.

The 3 AMERICAN AVOCETS on Jamaica Bay’s East Pond recently were down to 2 by Thursday, when 4 LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS were also reported there; STILT and PECTORAL SANDPIPERS were also noted there last weekend.

Three or four MARBLED GODWITS continue to be seen on the island off the Coast Guard Station at Jones Beach West End through today, and a couple of CASPIAN TERNS visited there in mid-week.

A female KING EIDER was still around Orient Point last Saturday, when an AMERICAN BITTERN was spotted at the Oceanside Marine Nature Study Area.

At Jones Beach West End a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW was around the hedgerow by the Coast Guard Station from Monday through today, when a second was also located nearby.

The Prospect Park LARK SPARROW was last reported last Saturday, when another was seen at an East Hampton farm.

A GRASSHOPPER SPARROW was found in Central Park today at the Oven, and a VESPER SPARROW was located Tuesday at the recently opened Shirley Chisholm State Park, the former landfill reached from the southern end of Pennsylvania Avenue in Brooklyn. The extensive grasslands there could prove to be very interesting.

NELSON’S SPARROWS are now very widespread in salt marshes locally, including such locations as Plumb Beach, the Oceanside Marine Nature Study Area and Pelham Bay Park.

YELLOW-BREASTED CHATS were noted at Prospect Park Sunday, Montauk Point Monday, and Robert Moses State Park today.

Among the decreasing variety of WARBLERS was a CONNECTICUT identified during the morning flight at Robert Moses State Park last Sunday, and a HOODED male was at Battery Park on Tuesday. Now is a decent time to look for ORANGE CROWNED WARBLERS.

BLUE GROSBEAKS this week included singles at Captree State Park Sunday, Jones Beach West End Tuesday, and Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn today.

A few DICKCISSELS included Sunday sightings from Fort Tilden to Robert Moses State Park and Montauk Point and up to Croton Point, with another at Jones Beach West End Monday.

Large numbers of Brant began arriving today

To phone in reports please call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Treehugger Tuesday

From MNN.com:

Birds are in trouble, but you can help them
Mary Jo DiLonardo
October 11, 2019, 8:26 a.m.

Audubon Society amplifies report with new tool, tips for bird lovers.

Two-thirds of birds in North America are at risk due to warming temperatures and human impact on the planet.

Just last month, a study published in the journal Science found that nearly 3 billion birds have disappeared on the continent since 1970. Now, the National Audubon Society has followed up with increasingly sobering news.

Scientists used 140 million records from field biologists and bird watchers to outline where 604 bird species live now. Then then used climate models to forecast how each species' range will likely shift as climate change and other human elements continue to have an impact.

The report found that 64% of species (389 of 604) were moderately or highly vulnerable to climate change. Vulnerability often depended on habitat. For example, 100% of Arctic bird species, 98% of boreal forest birds, 86% of western forest birds and 78% of waterbirds were vulnerable to climate change. The least vulnerable birds included those in marshlands (41%) and urban/suburban areas (38%). However, even in groups that were not as susceptible, more than a quarter were considered climate-vulnerable.


Species vulnerability grouped by habitat Species vulnerability varies depending upon habitat. (Photo: Stamen Design/National Audubon Society)

Researchers detailed the results along with maps and information on the species in the report, "Survival by Degrees: 389 Species on the Brink."

"Two-thirds of America's birds are threatened with extinction from climate change, but keeping global temperatures down will help up to 76 percent of them. There's hope in this report, but first, it'll break your heart if you care about birds and what they tell us about the ecosystems we share with them. It's a bird emergency," said David Yarnold, CEO and president of Audubon, in a statement.

The report studied climate-related impacts such as sea level rise and lake level changes, urban land use changes, cropland expansion, drought, extreme spring heat, fire weather and heavy rains.

"Birds are important indicator species, because if an ecosystem is broken for birds, it is or soon will be for people too," said Brooke Bateman, Ph.D., senior climate scientist for the National Audubon Society.

How you can help

Along with the report, Audubon offers a ZIP-code based tool so you can see which impacts from climate change are expected in your area and which bird species will be affected.

"We already know what we need to do to reduce global warming, and we already have a lot of the tools we need to take those steps. Now, what we need are more people committed to making sure those solutions are put into practice," said Renee Stone, vice president of climate for the National Audubon Society. "Our elected officials at every level of government must hear from their constituents that this is a priority. Audubon is committed to protecting the places birds need now and in the future and taking action to address the root causes of climate change."

You can help our flying friends and attract more birds to your yard by adding native trees, bushes and other plants that offer food and protection, as MNN's Tom Oder explains in detail. But Audubon also outlines five bigger-picture ways you can help birds survive through your actions at home and by advocating for the spaces they call home:

1 - Reduce energy use at home and ask elected officials to support energy-saving policies.
2 - Ask elected officials to expand clean energy development – like solar or wind power.
3 - Reduce carbon pollution released into the atmosphere. To lower carbon emissions, they suggest innovative solutions like a fee on carbon and setting a clean energy standard for electricity generation.
4 - Advocate for natural solutions such as protecting forests and grasslands that provide homes to birds and installing native plants to help birds adapt to climate change.
5 - Ask elected leaders to be climate and conservation champions.
...Read more

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