Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Treehugger Tuesday

From National Audubon Society:

Audubon and National Geographic Declare 2018 as Year of the Bird

More than 100 organizations join forces for 12 months of storytelling and science to examine how our changing environment is impacting birds around the globe.

Audubon and its partners have teamed up to officially make 2018 the Year of the Bird. Join today to help make the world a better place for birds and the planet.
Join Us

“If you take care of the birds, you take care of most of the big environmental problems in the world.”
Thomas E. Lovejoy, Tropical Conservation Biologist and National Geographic Fellow

2018 marks the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the most powerful and important bird-protection law ever passed. In honor of this milestone, National Geographic, the National Audubon Society, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and BirdLife International will join forces with more than 100 other organizations and millions of people around the world to celebrate 2018 as the “Year of the Bird.”

This effort aims to heighten public awareness of birds because of their wonder and beauty—and because they symbolize nature’s interconnectedness and the importance of caring for our shared planet. To get started, visitors to BirdYourWorld.org will discover simple but meaningful steps that anyone can take to help birds each month and join a pledge to participate. For example in February, participants are invited to join the Great Back Yard Bird Count and report the tally to help scientists track the health of bird populations. In March, participants will be invited to use a zip-code based native plant finder for their yards, gardens or balconies to help attract nesting birds and provide a needed sanctuary for migrating birds.

Through 12 months of storytelling, science research and conservation efforts, Year of the Bird will examine how our changing environment is driving dramatic losses among bird species around the globe and highlight what we can do to help bring birds back.

Participating organizations include nonprofit and conservation groups, state and federal agencies, zoos, nature centers, and ornithological societies that are working together to raise the visibility of birds and inspire action through #BirdYourWorld throughout 2018. The campaign will also utilize National Geographic’s portfolio of media platforms reaching millions of people around the world with engaging bird content that will educate, inspire and raise awareness about the challenges that birds are facing and what people can do to help.

Read More …
...Read more

Monday, January 22, 2018

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, January 27, 2018 to Sunday, January 28, 2018:

Bedford Audubon Society
January 27, 2018, 3:00pm - 6:00pm
Shawangunk Grasslands National Wildlife Refuge
Leader: Naturalist Tait Johansson
Join Tait on this early evening expedition to find Rough-legged Hawks, Northern Harriers, and Short-eared Owls. Family friendly for children 12 years and older accompanied by an adult. Depart Bylane at 1:30pm. Free. Level of physical difficulty: Easy. Dress warm. Please register with Susan at info@bedfordaudubon.org or (914) 302-9713
See more details

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Brooklyn Bird Club
Saturday, January 27, 2018, 8:45am
Coney Island Waterfowl tour
Meet 8:45 am inside the Dunkin Donuts on the corner of Surf Ave and Stillwell Ave (train entrance Coney Island/Stillwell Avenue station)
Leader: Richard Payne
Focus: Sea and bay waters ducks and waterfowl beach species
Registrar (for weather alerts): Peter Dorosh Prosbird@aol.com or text only cell 347-622-3559
Registration Period: Jan 20th – Jan 25th
Please review our general […]

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Gateway National Recreational Area
Sunday, January 28, 2018, 10:00am to 12:00pm
Hike the Trails of the North Forty Natural Area
It's winter, the perfect season for discovering the hidden secrets of the North Forty Natural Area at Floyd Bennett Field.
View Details

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Great South Bay Audubon Society
Saturday, January 27, 2018, 9:00am
Montauk
Leader(s): John Gluth (631-827-0120) & Ken Thompson (631-612-8028)
Due to the extreme weather forecasts, this trip was rescheduled from 1/6/18 to 1/27/18
Meet at Lighthouse parking lot. Latecomers can still join in the vicinity of the restaurant overlook. Directions Route 27 to 27A to end.

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Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, January 28, 7:00 am
Birding in Peace
Just because it’s winter, doesn’t mean that there aren’t interesting birds to discover in Green-Wood. For some bird species that migrate south after the breeding season, Brooklyn is their Miami during the cold months. Spend the early morning exploring the cemetery, looking for overwintering waterfowl, nuthatches, woodpeckers, sparrows, finches and any half-hardy birds that decided to stick around. By February we’ll see some of the early north-bound birds beginning to trickle back into the area.

$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members

Click here for our inclement weather policy.

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Hudson River Audubon Society
Saturday, January 27, 2018
Pelham Bay Park
Meet at Pelham Bay Park at 8 AM; far left corner of the Orchard Beach parking lot.
Pelham Bay Park is known for its wintering owls, uch as Northern Saw-whet, Great Horned, and Long-eared. We will also search the woods and water for winter birds. American Wigeon, Bufflehead, Red-breasted Merganser should be in the bays.
http://www.hras.org/wtobird/pelhambay.html

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Linnaean Society of New York
Saturday, January 27, 2018
Pelham Bay Park
Leader: Rob Jett
Registrar: Louise Fraza — louisefraza@yahoo.com or 212-534-6182
Registration opens: Monday, January 15
Ride: $15

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

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New York City Audubon
Saturday, January 27 – Sunday, January 28, 2018
Winter Waterfowl Weekend at Montauk
Guide: Gabriel Willow
The gatherings of sea ducks around Montauk Point are the largest winter concentrations in New York State; the Christmas Bird Count on Montauk Point consistently tallies from 125 to 135 species, one of the best totals in the Northeast. Species that come to feed on the Point’s rich kelp and mussel beds include common and red-throated loon, common eider, all three scoter species, bufflehead, common goldeneye, great cormorant, and red-breasted merganser. Harlequin duck and king eider also occur here regularly during the winter. Accommodations at Daunt's Albatross in Montauk and transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $295 ($55 single supplement)
Click here to register

Saturday, January 27, 2018, 8:00am – 10:30am (Rescheduled date)
Intro to Birding: Bird Walk in Central Park
Guide: Tod Winston
Are you curious about "birding" but don’t have much (or any) experience? Come on a relaxed winter walk to some of Central Park’s hotspots to go over birding basics and see sparrows, finches, ducks, and more. Binoculars available. Limited to 15. $36 (25)
Click here to register

Sunday, January 28, 2018, 8:30am – 2:30pm
Duck Walk at Baisley Pond Park and Willow Lake Preserve, Queens
Guide: Corey Finger
Baisley Pond Park is the best place to see wintering ring-necked ducks and redheads in New York City. A wide variety of both dabbling and diving ducks regularly winter in the pond, including American wigeon, ruddy ducks, gadwall, and northern shovelers. We'll also look for wintering songbirds and gulls. From Baisley Pond Park we'll move to Willow Lake Preserve, the "natural" part of the preserve, to see common mergansers and the pair of bald eagles that have wintered here the past two years. Habitat next to the lake often hides a variety of wintering sparrows and other songbirds. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $63 (90)
Click here to register

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Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Sunday, January 28, 2018, 9:15am – 3:30pm
The Richard Buegler Winter 10-Mile Walk
Meet at 9:15 in the Willowbrook Park carousel parking lot off Eton Place. Dress for the weather and bring water and a lunch. We’ll follow the trails south through La Tourette to High Rock Park to see what the winter has to offer, and eventually return to the parking lot in Willowbrook Park. If there is snow cover there may be able to track wildlife, and perhaps we see some of our wintering birds. If there is rain, it will be “fun in the mud.”
Call Dominick Durso at 917-478-7607 or Don Recklies at 718-768-9036 for more information.

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Queens County Bird Club
Saturday, January 27, 2018
Montauk Point
Leader: Ian Resnick (917) 626-9562
Birding Sites Maps

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South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, January 28, 2018
Point Lookout Town Park and Lido Preserve
From the Southern State Parkway, exit onto the Meadowbrook State Parkway south. Exit from the Meadowbrook at Loop Parkway (just before the Jones Beach toll booths) toward Point Lookout. The Loop Parkway ends west of Point Lookout at Lido Boulevard. Continue straight across Lido Boulevard into Point Lookout Park. Travel past the ticket booths and curve left into the very large parking lot on the south side of the park. Park in the southeast corner, closest to the private homes of the village of Point Lookout and the beach. We will walk east along the beach toward Jones Inlet. After returning to the parking lot, we will drive west on Lido Boulevard to Lido Beach Passive Nature Preserve on the north side of Lido Boulevard to walk through the bay marsh.
Directions to Point Lookout Park via Google Maps | Directions to Lido Beach Passive Nature Preserve via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.
...Read more

Friday, January 19, 2018

Friday's Foto

Despite their common name, the Iceland Gull can actually be seen outside of Iceland. While they can be found there in winter their breeding range is southern Baffin Island, southern Greenland, northwestern Quebec, and on islands in northern Hudson Bay. This species overwinters in the North Atlantic from the British Isles, the eastern United State's northernmost states and the interior of North America as far west as the western Great Lakes. The similar, but much larger Glaucous Gull is more common in Europe. The Iceland Gull nests on rocky cliffs in the High arctic.

About the size of the ubiquitous Herring Gull, this medium-sized, pale gull consists of three subspecies, which includes the recently merged "Thayer's" Gull. The “Iceland” form breeds in Greenland and winters mainly in the North Atlantic. The adult has very pale to completely white wingtips. The “Kumlien’s” is the form most commonly seen in winter on the East Coast of North America. Wingtip color varies from nearly white to gray. The “Thayer’s” winters on the West Coast of North America and usually has slightly darker wings, dark gray to black wingtips, and heavy streaking or smudging on the head and neck in winter. There’s lots of overlap between each of these forms, and some individuals can’t be easily placed into a subspecies based on plumage. It takes four years to attain their adult plumage.

Like most gulls their diet consists of primarily fish. In addition, they feed on carrion, crustaceans, mollusks, berries and seeds.

Their conservation status according to the IUCN Red List is “Least Concern”.

The scientific name, Larus glaucoides, means Gr. laros gull; blue-gray or resembling Glaucous Gull. Watch a video on how to separate Iceland and Glaucous Gulls here.

In Brooklyn during the winter, look for this species along the coast at Bush Terminal Park, Pier 4 at the Brooklyn Army Terminal, Veterans Memorial Pier, Gravesend Bay, Coney Island and Floyd Bennett Field.

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Treehugger Tuesday

From National Geographic:

The man who flies with birds in an effort to save them

Monday, January 15, 2018

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, January 20, 2018 to Sunday, January 21, 2018:

Bedford Audubon Society
Saturday, January 20, 2018 @ 10:00am - 12:00pm
Winter Tree Identification at Muscoot Farm with Naturalist Tait Johansson
Muscoot Farm, 51 NY-100, Katonah, NY 10536, USA
Tait will teach youhow to use a tree’s structure, bark, and other clues to ID it even after theleaves have fallen. Family friendly, but all children must be accompanied by an adult. Free. Level of physical difficulty: Easy. Dress warm.
Please register with Susan at info@bedfordaudubon.org or 914.302.9713.
See more details

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Brooklyn Bird Club
Saturday, January 20, 2018
Floyd Bennett Field
Leader: Chris Laskowski
Focus: Winter open field birds, raptors, sea and bay ducks and waterfowl
Car fee: $10.00
Registrar: Peter Dorosh Prosbird@aol.com or text only cell 347-622-3559
Registration Period: Jan 13th – Jan 18th
Please review our general trip information and guidelines on this page.

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Gateway National Recreational Area
Saturday, January 20, 2018, 10:00am to 11:30am
Winter Nature Hike
Location: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
View Details

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Linnaean Society of New York
Saturday, January 20, 2018
Jones Beach
Leader: Richard ZainEldeen
Registrar: Kathleen Howley — kathleenhowley@gmail.com or 212-877-3170
Registration opens: Monday, January 8
Ride: $25

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

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New York City Audubon
Saturday, January 20, 8:30am – 10:30am
Eagle Watch and Bird Walk at Inwood Hill Park
Guide: Annie Barry
Join Annie Barry for a winter hike through the various landscapes and habitats of Inwood Hill Park. Located at the northern tip of Manhattan where the Harlem River meets the Hudson, Inwood Hill Park offers shoreline vistas, mature forest, and the last natural salt marsh in Manhattan. We'll begin on the Hudson shore in search of the bald eagles that have been sighted there frequently in recent winters, then move into the forest to search for wintering and year-round birds, and finally to the salt marsh to look for wintering ducks. Some hilly walking required. Limited to 15 $36 (25)
Click here to register

Saturday, January 20, 2018, 9:30am – 11:00am
Forest Park Feeder Watch and Owl Prowl
Guide: Corey Finger
Meet at the corner of Park Lane South and Metropolitan Avenue. Explore the depths of the largest contiguous forest in Queens. Highlights include the feeding station at the famed Waterhole and a search for owls in the pine groves. Common feeder sightings include woodpeckers, black-capped chickadee, American goldfinch, and usually at least one brown creeper. Past years have also seen ruby-crowned kinglet and pine warbler. On the owl prowl, look for sightings of great horned, northern saw-whet, or long-eared owl. Limited to 15. $36 (25)
Click here to register

Saturday, January 20, 2018, 10:30am – 4:00pm
Snow Birds of Floyd Bennett Field and Fort Tilden
Guide: Gabriel Willow
Winter brings many rare birds to the City that can’t be found here at any other time. Perhaps most exciting are the “snow birds” of the Arctic tundra, such as snow buntings and snowy owls, that can occasionally be found in tundra-like habitats further south. Look for these and other winter visitors such as horned larks, American tree sparrows, and rough-legged hawks, as well as wintering ducks, grebes, and loons.
Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $88 (62) per walk
Click here to register

Sunday, January 21, 2018, 9:20am – 4:00pm
Winter Eagles on the Hudson
Guide: Gabriel Willow
Join NYC Audubon in seeking out one of the most incredible avian spectacles in New York: bald eagles wintering along the frozen Hudson River by the dozens or even hundreds. We will travel in comfort by Metro-North to Croton Point Park, where we will look for eagles before hiking up to Croton Point Park to seek out wintering short-eared and snowy owls, snow buntings, horned larks, and other cold-weather specialties. Limited to 20. Round-trip Metro-North fare ($20.50) not included in trip price. $53 (37)
Click here to register

Sunday, January 21, 2018, 10:00am – 11:30am
Birding the Battery
Guide: Jacob Drucker
Join guide Jacob Drucker at the convergence of the East and Hudson Rivers to search for winter waterbirds and discover the nooks and crannies of Battery Park. Who knows what hardy songbirds could be tucked away in the southernmost of Manhattan's parks? Limited to 15. $36 (25)
Click here to register

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South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, January 21, 2018
Pelham Bay Park
Pelham Bay Park (where we hope to see owls): Wear hiking shoes — it’s a hilly forest walk to the bay. Take Throgs Neck Bridge to I-695 north to I-95 north. Take I-95 to exit #9, Hutchinson River Parkway north. Take first exit #5, Orchard Beach Rd., go past traffic circle, and continue on Orchard Beach Rd. to end. Turn left on Park Dr. Go past another traffic circle and enter parking lot through toll gates (free); meet at far left corner of parking lot (northeast corner). See www.mappery.com/Pelham-Bay-Park-NYC-Map or Google’s map of “Orchard Beach Parking Lot” for reference.
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


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Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, January 20, 2018
The New York City Naturalist Club: Eagle Watch at Payson Center (in Inwood Hill Park), Manhattan
9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
New York City is home to an amazing abundance of wildlife. Our Rangers will guide you to the best viewing spots in the urban jungle. All skill levels are welcomed.
Free!

Birding: Winter Birds at Green-Wood Cemetery at 25th Street, Brooklyn
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
New York City is home to an amazing abundance of wildlife. Our Rangers will guide you to the best wildlife viewing spots in the urban jungle. All skill levels are welcome.
Free!

Birding: Winter Waterfowl at 155th Street and Baisley Boulevard (in Baisley Pond Park), Queens
1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.
New York City is home to an amazing abundance of wildlife. Our Urban Park Rangers will guide you to the best wildlife viewing spots in the urban jungle. All skill levels are welcome.
Free!

Sunday, January 21, 2018
Birding: Winter Waterfowl at Park Drive and Clove Road (in Clove Lakes Park), Staten Island
10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
New York City is home to an amazing abundance of wildlife. Our Rangers will guide you to the best wildlife viewing spots in the urban jungle. All skill levels are welcomed.
Free!
...Read more

Friday, January 12, 2018

Friday's Foto

The year 2017 held one final surprise for some Brooklyn birders. A rare Greater White-fronted Goose was found by Shane Blodgett at the end of the day on December 29th. It was too late for me to go look for it near Floyd Bennett Field, so I went out early the next day. I eventually refound it with Josh Malbin at the Marine Park Golf Course. It wasn't a county bird for me as I'd seen one at Calvert Vaux Park in 2011.

The Greater White-fronted Goose is a dark, stocky goose with a black tail, large black splotches on the belly, white rump and bright orange legs. It has white facial feathers around the base of the pinkish-yellow & orange bill (one colloquial name is "specklebelly"). Found only west of the Mississippi River in North America, this long distance migrant nests on Arctic tundra. There are also populations in Europe.

Like many species of goose, their diet is primarily plant material - seeds and waste grain in winter; stems and roots, berries and buds during the breeding season.

According to the IUCN Red List, the conservation status for this species is "Least Concern".

Their scientific name, Anser albifrons, means goose; white-fronted.

Tuesday, January 09, 2018

Treehugger Tuesday

From the website “Earther”:

Our Best Evidence Yet That Humans Are Fixing the Ozone Hole
Maddie Stone
Friday 4:30pm

The ozone hole feels like the quintessential ‘80s problem, but unlike car phones and mullets, it remains relevant in a number of ways. For starters, it’s still there, chilling over Antartica. More importantly, it’s slowly healing, and a new study offers some of the best evidence yet that sound environmental policy is responsible.

It’s been nearly 30 years since the world adopted the Montreal Protocol, a landmark treaty banning the use of ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). But despite a firm scientific understanding of the link between CFCs and ozone depletion, it’s been tough to tell how much of a success the protocol was, because the ozone hole didn’t start showing signs of recovery until a few years back.

Moreover, nobody had actually measured the chemistry of the hole to see if ozone-destroying compounds are declining as we’d expect due to the Montreal Protocol.

A study published this week in Geophysical Research Letters addresses that knowledge gap. The authors, from NASA’s Goddard Spaceflight Center, made use of data collected by NASA’s Aura satellite, which measures a suite of trace atmospheric gases to understand changes to the ozone layer, Earth’s climate, and air pollution.

“It kind of surprised me that no one had done this,” lead study author Susan Strahan told Earther. “The data is there if you’re careful about what data to use.”

Strahan and her colleague Anne Douglass looked at changing ozone levels above Antarctica throughout the austral winter from 2005 to 2016, and found that ozone depletion had declined by about 20 percent. Then, they looked at levels of hydrochloric acid in the stratosphere at the end of winter, an indicator of how much ozone had been destroyed by CFCs.



Sure enough, chlorine levels declined as well, at a rate of about 0.8 percent per year. That’s in line with model expectations of how much CFC levels should have declined over the same time period thanks to the Montreal Protocol’s ban. “This reaffirms our scientific understanding of what’s controlling ozone,” she said.

Bill Randall, an atmospheric scientist at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research who was not involved with the study, told Earther he thought the paper’s analysis was “very well done.”

“They’re seeing net decreases in chlorine that are very consistent with the Montreal Protocol,” he said. “That’s a big take home message, that the Montreal Protocol is doing what we think it should be doing.”

Indeed, the Montreal Protocol continues to demonstrate that science and policy really can work together to solve environmental problems. In the case of the ozone hole, it’s taken decades for the results to become apparent. Strahan estimates the hole won’t be totally healed until the 2060s to 2080s, and that’s assuming we don’t start screwing it up anew.

But at a time when it often feels like scientists and politicians are on opposite sides of a giant ice wall waiting for eternal winter to arrive, the fact that science-based policy can deliver results is worth remembering.

Or, as Strahan put it, “It’s nice to have some positive environmental news for a change.”
...Read more

Monday, January 08, 2018

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, January 13, 2018 to Sunday, January 14, 2018:

Brooklyn Bird Club
Friday, January 13 - Monday, January 15, 2018
Weekend Trip: A Southern New Jersey Winter Blitz-“zer” in the Pine Barrens, Cumberland County and the Coastal Barrier Islands
Leader: Peter Dorosh
Focus: Winter species, waterfowl, raptors, ducks, winter songbird residents
Car fee: $100.00
Registrar: Peter Dorosh, Prosbird@aol.com or text only cell 347-622-3559
Registration Period: Oct 1st – Dec 30th
Note: This is a MEMBERS ONLY weekend trip which begins Saturday morning, focusing on New Jersey’s varied prominent winter locations for bird species diversity. Please register as […]

Sunday, January 14, 2018 @ 8:00am
Two Hour Waterfowl Count in Prospect Park
Leader: Steve Nanz
Focus: The official waterfowl count of ducks, geese, swans, grebe, coots
Meet: 8 AM at Bartel Pritchard entrance of Prospect Park Source: http://nybirds.org/ProjWaterfowl.htm
Please review our general trip information and guidelines on this page.

Sunday, January 14, 2018 @ 9:00am
Early Winter at Marine Park
Leader: Heydi Lopes
Focus: Waterfowl & marsh birds Moved from January 7 due to inclement weather.
Registration not necessary!
Meet at the Marine Park Nature center at 9AM Sunday Jan 14th.
Site profile: http://www.saltmarshalliance.org/
Please review our general trip information and guidelines on this page.

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Gateway National Recreational Area
Saturday, January 13, 2018, 2:30pm to 3:30pm
Winter Woodpecker Walk
Location: Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Join a ranger on a walk along the East Pond as we seek out some of winter's noisier but beloved inhabitants....woodpeckers!
View Details

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Linnaean Society of New York
Saturday, January 13, 2018
Croton Point Park
Leader: Paul Keim
Registrar: Anne Lazarus — amlazarus47@gmail.com or 212-673-9059
Registration opens: Monday, January 1
Public transportation

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

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New York City Audubon
Friday, January 12 – Sunday, January 14, 2018
Montauk Winter Weekend with American Littoral Society
Guide: Don Riepe with American Littoral Society
Spend a weekend at the luxurious Manor House during the peak winter birding time at Montauk Point. See seals, scoters, loons, eiders, goldeneye, and much more. Includes 2 nights lodging, 5 meals, 5 guided hikes, 2 evening programs, and free pickup at the LIRR station in Montauk.
For reservations and details, contact Don Riepe at 718-474-0896 or donriepe@gmail.com. $395 ($130 single supplement)

Saturday, January 13, 2018, 10:30am – 4:00pm
Snow Birds of Floyd Bennett Field and Fort Tilden
Guide: Gabriel Willow
Winter brings many rare birds to the City that can’t be found here at any other time. Perhaps most exciting are the “snow birds” of the Arctic tundra, such as snow buntings and snowy owls, that can occasionally be found in tundra-like habitats further south. Look for these and other winter visitors such as horned larks, American tree sparrows, and rough-legged hawks, as well as wintering ducks, grebes, and loons.
Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $88 (62) per walk
Click here to register

Sunday, January 14, 2018, 9:30am – 11:30am
Winter Birding Along the Hudson: Wave Hill
Guide: Gabriel Willow with Wave Hill
Meet at the Perkins Visitor Center. The Hudson River valley hosts an impressive diversity of bird species, even during the winter months. Come explore the beautiful gardens and woodlands of Wave Hill and observe the hardy birds that spend the winter in this urban oasis. Walks run rain or shine. Ages 10 and up welcome with an adult. See www.wavehill.org for admission rates. NYC Audubon members enjoy two-for-one admission

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Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Sunday, January 14, 2018 @ 11:00am – 1:00pm
Buck’s Hollow and Heyerdahl Hill
Walk a 3.2 mile loop in one of the wild valleys in New York City. Learn about the ecology of serpentine barrens. Meet at Meisner dam at Meisner Avenue and Manor Road. Parking is available along the road to Eger Nursing Home.
To register for the walk please e-mail Hillel Lofaso at hillel5757@gmail.com or call 718-477-0545.
Read More

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Queens County Bird Club
Saturday, January 13, 2018
Point Lookout
Leader: Mike Zito (516) 507-9419
Where: Point Lookout, NY 11569, USA (map)

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South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, January 14, 2018
Mill Pond Park
Use street parking on the westbound side of Merrick Road. The park is four blocks west of the Wantagh State Parkway.
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


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Urban Park Rangers
Sunday, January 14, 2018
Winter Birding at Perkins Visitors Center (in Wave Hill), Bronx
9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
The Hudson River Valley hosts an impressive diversity of bird species in the winter. Observe birds in their winter habitats and explore Wave Hill with naturalist Gabriel Willow.

Birding: Owls at Alley Pond Park, Queens
10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
Our Urban Park Rangers will guide you to the best wildlife viewing spots in the urban jungle. Participants are chosen by lottery.
Registration begins on January 3.
Free!
...Read more

Saturday, January 06, 2018

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, January 5, 2018:

- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Jan. 5, 2018
* NYNY1801.05

- Birds mentioned
TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE+
WHITE-WINGED DOVE+
WESTERN TANAGER+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE
ROSS'S GOOSE
Cackling Goose
Eurasian Wigeon
KING EIDER
HARLEQUIN DUCK
BARROW'S GOLDENEYE
Red-necked Grebe
EARED GREBE
Great Egret
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
Bald Eagle
Rough-legged Hawk
Clapper Rail
Lesser Yellowlegs
Long-billed Dowitcher
DOVEKIE
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Iceland Gull
GLAUCOUS GULL
Snowy Owl
Short-eared Owl
Northern Saw-whet Owl
Common Raven
Lapland Longspur
Northern Waterthrush
Black-and-white Warbler
Orange-crowned Warbler
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT
Savannah Sparrow
Rusty Blackbird
RED CROSSBILL

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, January 5th 2018 at 8pm. The highlights of today's tape are TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE, WESTERN TANAGER, WHITE-WINGED DOVE, EARED GREBE, ROSS'S GOOSE, GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE, BARROW'S GOLDENEYE, KING EIDER, HARLEQUIN DUCK, BLACK-HEADED GULL, GLAUCOUS GULL, DOVEKIE, YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, RED CROSSBILL and more.

Thursday's snow storm, plus recent frigid temperatures, certainly have had a significant effect on regional bird life including 2 rarities struggling to subsist in our area. The WESTERN TANAGER at Crocheron Park in Queens was last seen Wednesday taking advantage of suet placed out for it but it has not been noted in that area since. The TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE east of Oyster Bay was also still present Wednesday but its chances of survival are presumably better than the Tanager's as it has been feeding on junipers in more suitable habitat. This location is on the east side of Sandy Hill Road just north of the entrance to the Tiffany Creek Preserve on the west side of the road. Parking is available at the preserve then continue up Sandy Hill Road past a private road on the right to the field just beyond. When being seen the SOLITAIRE is usually around a small stand of junipers towards the northeastern corner of the field, one juniper still bearing lots of berries. There have been long periods during which the bird is not visible.

The Southern Nassau Christmas Count last Saturday recorded 132 species including a very unusual Winter rarity. A WHITE-WINGED DOVE sticking around a private feeder in Malverne at least long enough to be photographed. Other count highlights included 2 CACKLING GEESE, 7 HARLEQUIN DUCKS, 2 KING EIDERS off the Jones Beach West End jetty, one a nice adult like male, 5 GREAT EGRETS, a YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, an EARED GREBE off Nickerson Beach, RED-NECKED GREBE, 2 BALD EAGLES, ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK, CLAPPER RAIL, 2 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, ICELAND GULL, SHORT-EARED, NORTHERN SAW-WHET and 3 SNOWY OWLS, 2 COMMON RAVENS, 5 LAPLAND LONGSPURS at Jones Beach West End, a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH at the same location as on last year's count, 2 ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS, 36 Ipswich Sparrows [SAVANNAH SPARROW] and 31 RUSTY BLACKBIRDS.

Waterfowl moving around more now with most fresh water freezing up have featured a ROSS'S GOOSE at Baisley Pond in Queens Monday and Tuesday. The Brooklyn GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was spotted on the Marine Park Golf Course last Saturday with scattered CACKLING GEESE. Two young male KING EIDERS were still in Setauket Harbor Tuesday as viewed from Shore Road and a female BARROW'S GOLDENEYE was spotted Monday in Fire Island Inlet from the western end of Oak Beach Road. Up to 7 HARLEQUIN DUCKS remain around Jones Inlet either near the Jones Beach West End jetty or the jetties off the Point Lookout side. Two recent EURASIAN WIGEONS include one in Brooklyn's Salt Marsh Nature Center and one on Mill Pond in Sayville. A flock of 7 DOVEKIES were spotted moving past Montauk Point Tuesday morning and an adult BLACK-HEADED GULL was still at Five Islands Park off Route 1 in New Rochelle Westchester County Wednesday. Single GLAUCOUS GULLS were noted at Swan Lake in Patchogue Wednesday and at Goldsmith Inlet in Peconic on the north fork Thursday. An ICELAND GULL was also at Swan Lake Wednesday this following one in Brooklyn last weekend including at the Brooklyn Army Terminal Pier 4. Two RED-NECKED GREBES were still off Floyd Bennett Field Monday, another at Jones Beach West End Wednesday and 2 LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS remained along Santapogue Creek in West Babylon at least to Wednesday.

ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK numbers have been picking up recently especially coastally.

On Staten Island among the few lingering warblers have been the YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER at Midland Beach and a BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER and a YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT was noted along Dune Road in West Hampton early in the week.

A LAPLAND LONGSPUR was at Robert Moses State Park field 5 Wednesday and a RED CROSSBILL was reported flying over a Smithtown home last Saturday reminding us to be on the lookout for Winter finches.

To phone in reports on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Tuesday, January 02, 2018

Treehugger Tuesday

From Earth Times:

How Climate Change Affects Extreme Weather in the US.
Bobbi Peterson - 19 Dec 2017 11:15:0 GMT

Global warming is a bit of a misnomer. While the average earthly temperature does climb in correlation to the amount of atmospheric carbon, people tend to rely on their observations of the weather to validate or repudiate the science behind climate change. After an unusually warm winter, many will claim they have personally experienced the effects of global warming, while others might point to record low temperatures in other parts of the world as evidence to the contrary.

While such observations are convenient to use as evidence for already-formed opinions on the matter, these should not hold as scientific proof for or against the climate change science. When observing weather-related phenomena, it is important to look at the factors concerning the weather and to determine how slight changes in global temperature might impact them.

Tides, for instance, will shift depending on the temperature of the water and the seasonal currents. One of the most significant controlling factors in weather across the globe, tides oscillate in somewhat predictable patterns, supplying cold and warm water to various parts of the world. With the changes in global temperature and the melting of icecaps, infusions of cold water from ice melt drastically change the orderly machinations of the tides.

In this instance, strange weather is indicative of global climate change. The following are a couple of extreme weather phenomena and how global warming can exacerbate them.

Drought/Fires

The West Coast has been experiencing increasingly worse droughts each summer. Many scientists are attributing the dramatic uptick in dryness and wildfires to global climate change. Here’s how:

Increased global temperatures have reduced the annual snowpack on mountains around the West Coast. Because of this, and the little remaining snow melting earlier in the season than usual, the availability of water during peak dry season is harder to find. Other human activity, including using water for irrigation and in urban settings, put an ever-greater strain on the water and result in drier summers.

With hotter, drier summers, vegetation suffers the most. Trees and shrubbery dry out quicker, and the buildup of dry, dead fuel in and around forested areas results in more forest fires, as seen this year in California. Fires become harder to control because the water is so limited and the availability of fuel has significantly increased.

Hurricanes

A plethora of oceanic factors contributes to the worsening of tropical storms and hurricanes in recent years. First, simply having a higher ocean temperature will naturally intensify storms and hurricanes, which feed on warm air and water as they intensify. Warm air rises, creating the cyclone motion of hurricanes.

However, other factors also contribute to the worsening tropical weather. A warmer atmosphere naturally carries more humidity and moisture, which worsens rainstorms and adds to the ferocity of the storm at hand and the flooding that comes with it. Keep in mind that the majority of the destruction caused by hurricanes is due to flooding, even more so than the initial storm surge.

Snow

Ironically, global warming is contributing to severe snowstorms in different areas of the world. Snowfall comes down to slightly increased atmospheric temperatures and the increased moisture associated with said warmth. More moisture in the atmosphere means snowstorms are more likely — snow is freezing atmospheric precipitation — and more severe when storms do occur. Expect continuing harsh winter weather, and make sure you prepare accordingly this season. The science runs deeper than just this, however. The increased atmospheric temperatures also allow for more days when the atmosphere hits the perfect "Goldilocks temperature" — when the temperature is slightly below freezing, allowing for maximum atmospheric moisture while still supporting snowfall. On winter days when the temperature might typically fall too far below that threshold, resulting in scattered, tiny flakes, we instead experience massive, thick snowfall.

A Look to the Future

Things are going to get strange over the coming decades. We can expect continued coastal beatings from increasingly powerful tropical storms and hurricanes. KL. Rasmussen of Colorado State University gave us this paper yesterday on exactly how we expect climate change will be affected locally by global warming: This summary can be used to reach "Climate Dynamics, " the journal involved. What we expect is that some parts of the U.S. will progressively dry into desert, while others will see massive snowfall in the winter. Temperature fluctuations may not be noticeable for a while, but strange weather patterns will continue, showing us just how severe global climate change can be.

Read more at http://www.earthtimes.org/climate/how-climate-change-affects-weather-US/3032/#TBfmHI0UVEtTqz6S.99
...Read more

Monday, January 01, 2018

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

HAPPY NEW YEAR! Below is a list of upcoming nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, January 6, 2018 to Sunday, January 7, 2018:

Audubon Center in Prospect Park
Sunday, January 7, 2018, 10am – 11am
Early Morning Bird Walk: Bring in the New Year with Birds
Join Prospect Park Alliance to explore the Park’s nature trails and discover the beautiful plumage and fascinating behavior of the Park’s wintering ducks. Please note this tour leaves promptly at 10 am. Led by the Brooklyn Bird Club.

**********

Brooklyn Bird Club
Sunday, January 7, 2018 (note rescheduled date)
Early Winter at Marine Park
Leader: Heydi Lopes
Focus: Waterfowl and marsh birds
Car fee: $10.00
Registrar: Dennis Hrehowsik, email deepseagangster@gmail.com
Registration Period: Dec 30th - Jan 4th
Site profile: http://www.saltmarshalliance.org/
Please review our general trip information and guidelines on this page.

**********

Eastern Long Island Audubon Society
Saturday, January 6, 2018, meet at 9am
Lakes Around Patchogue
Leader: John McNeil
Meet at the parking area at the corner of Lake Drive and East Main Street in East Patchogue by the side of Swan Lake. We will check out Swan Lake and then visit several other spots for a look at the bountiful water birds that flock to LI in the winter. Hopefully a surprise or two will be waiting for us. Contact John McNeil at 631.281.2623 or mcneil.jp@gmail.com
Snow date: Saturday, January 13, 2018
For all our walks be sure to dress for the weather and bring binoculars!

**********

Great South Bay Audubon Society
Saturday, January 6, 2018, 9:00am
Montauk Pt.
Leader(s): John Gluth (631-827-0120) & Ken Thompson (631-612-8028)
Meet at Lighthouse parking lot. Latecomers can still join in the vicinity of the restaurant overlook. Directions Route 27 to 27A to end.

**********

Huntington-Oyster Bay Audubon Society
Sunday, January 7, 2018, 9:00am
Sunken Meadow State Park
We will investigate the trails, ponds, and seashore to see what birds are leftover from the fall and which birds have arrived for the winter.
Registration: 585-880-0915
Directions: Take Sunken Meadow Parkway north to the end. Meet in the southwest corner of the main parking lot.

**********

New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

**********

New York City Audubon
Saturday, January 6, 2018, 8:00am – 10:30am
Intro to Birding: Bird Walk in Central Park
Guide: Tod Winston
Are you curious about "birding" but don’t have much (or any) experience? Come on a relaxed winter walk to some of Central Park’s hotspots to go over birding basics and see sparrows, finches, ducks, and more. Binoculars available. Limited to 15. $36 (25)
Click here to register

Saturday, January 6, 2018, 9am – 6pm
Winter Birding on the South Shore of Long Island
Guide: Gabriel Willow
Winter in New York brings the excitement of possibility: Will snowy owls appear in the dunes? Will harlequin ducks move westward from Cape Cod and Montauk and appear in closer waters? Will irruptive northern finches and bohemian waxwings move south from Canada? All of these species and more are possible on Long Island in the winter, along with more expected species such as loons, grebes, scaup, eider, northern harriers, and purple sandpiper. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $95 (67)
Click here to register

Saturday, January 6, 2018, 9am – 11am
Randall's Island Winter Walk
Guide: Nadir Souirgi
Explore this lesser known spot in the East River, where recently restored freshwater wetlands and salt marsh provide habitat for many varieties of birds. Hunt for rarities such as common goldeneye, lesser black-backed gull, and Iceland gull. Limited to 15. $36 (25)
Click here to register

Saturday, January 6, 2018, 9:30am – 11:00am
Jamaica Bay Winter Bird Walk
Guide: Corey Finger
Though winter may seem lifeless, there are always birds around at Jamaica Bay. A walk around the West Pond in winter should provide sightings of a variety of diving and dabbling ducks, gulls, flocks of geese, and some hardy songbirds. We'll be bundled up in layers of clothing while the birds will be getting by with just their feathers. Marvel at the wonders of winter survival on this Jamaica Bay winter walk. Limited to 15. $40 (28)
Click here to register

Sunday, January 7, 2018, 9am – 2pm
Winter Birds of DeKorte Park, NJ
Guide: Gabriel Willow
Come explore the wilds of the New Jersey Meadowlands at DeKorte Park. Here, the Hackensack River meets extensive coastal marshes, creating a rich habitat for wildlife—especially wintering waterfowl and raptors. We'll be on the lookout for large flocks of canvasback, northern pintail, bufflehead, and northern shoveler. And we'll scan the skies for hunting raptors including rough-legged and Cooper’s hawks, northern harriers, and perhaps even a snowy or short-eared owl. We can warm up at the environmental center and learn about the Meadowlands' ecology. Transport by passenger van included. Limited to 12. $88 (62)
Click here to register

Sunday, January 7, 2018, 9am – 11am
Lower Manhattan Pocket Park Blitz
Guide: Jacob Drucker
Couch's kingbird, Scott's oriole, and western tanager are the crown jewels of extraordinary rarities that found refuge in lower Manhattan's pocket parks in recent winters. We will search several of these small parks for "half-hardy" songbirds and hope for something unusual, starting with Madison, Union Square, and Gramercy Parks. We will then have the option to work our way south, covering Stuyvesant, Tompkins Square, and Washington Square Parks. Rarities or not, this is a great route to pick up a few early-year birds that won't be seen until spring. Limited to 15. $36 (25)
Click here to register

**********

South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, January 7, 2018
Hempstead Lake State Park
From the Southern State Parkway, take Exit 18 (Eagle Avenue) south to Field 3 (use second park entrance and make an immediate left turn.)
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.
...Read more

Friday, December 29, 2017

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, December 29, 2017:

- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Dec. 29, 2017
* NYNY1712.29


- Birds mentioned
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN+
MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD+
TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE+
WESTERN TANAGER+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Greater White-fronted Goose
Cackling Goose
TUFTED DUCK
KING EIDER
HARLEQUIN DUCK
BARROW'S GOLDENEYE
Red-necked Grebe
EARED GREBE
Bald Eagle
Rough-legged Hawk
Semipalmated Plover
Spotted Sandpiper
Long-billed Dowitcher
Wilson's Snipe
Razorbill
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Laughing Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GLAUCOUS GULL
Barn Owl
Northern Saw-whet Owl
Eastern Phoebe
Marsh Wren
Lapland Longspur
Black-and-white Warbler
Orange-crowned Warbler
Pine Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
Rusty Blackbird

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, December 29th 2017 at 8pm. The highlights of today's tape are MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD, WESTERN TANAGER, TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE, AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN, TUFTED DUCK, BARROW'S GOLDENEYE, KING EIDER, HARLEQUIN DUCK, EARED GREBE, BLACK-HEADED GULL, GLAUCOUS GULL and much more.

Of our recent trio of exciting western passerines two continue but one may have moved on. The female plumaged MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD present since December 17th on Tuesday was seen around field 2 at Robert Moses State Park and then very shortly thereafter back at the Red Cedars along the bay side of Democrat Point at the western tip of Fire Island but it has not been reported from there since Tuesday. Please let us know of any later sightings. The WESTERN TANAGER at Crocheron Park in Queens was still present today near the pond at the south end of the park near the terminus of 35th Avenue. The TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE, east of Oyster Bay, can be difficult to find but does continue around the field and hedge row on the east side of Sandy Hill Road just north of the entrance to Tiffany Creek Preserve.

An AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN arriving at Playland Lake in Rye in Westchester County on the 21st stayed around to provide the Bronx-Westchester Christmas Count with a new record Saturday and was last seen on the lake late Tuesday morning interestingly spotted moving by over Pelham Bay Park in the Bronx about noontime. Fortunately headed south.

Nice ducks in the area, thanks in part to this freeze up, include an eclipse male TUFTED DUCK spotted in a scaup flock on Santapogue Creek in West Babylon near where up to 5 LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS continue to be seen. Freezing water could force the flock to move further down the creek towards Phoenician Shores Park. This bird currently has a very short crest.

A female BARROW'S GOLDENEYE was spotted this morning off Oak Neck Beach in Bayville probably moving east with some of the Common Goldeneyes. A male BARROW'S GOLDENEYE previously present in the northern part of Jamaica Bay could also be worth looking for.

At Jones Beach West End a winter male KING EIDER in nice plumage off the jetty has been in a flock of Common Eider that also features an immature male KING. Three HARLEQUIN DUCKS also continue near the jetty and if not there could be at the jetties on the Point Lookout side of Jones Inlet. Two young male KING EIDERS were also seen today along the east side of Setauket Harbor as viewed from Shore Road. One of these was noted on the Smithtown Count on Wednesday. An adult BLACK-HEADED GULL in Setauket Harbor was found on Tuesday and another adult remains around Five Island Park in New Rochelle a highlight of the Bronx-Westchester Count.

An EARED GREBE was still present last Sunday off the western end of Oak Beach Road where it's usually west of the Fisherman's parking lot.

Speaking of Christmas Counts the Bronx-Westchester Count last Saturday recorded 108 species including GREATER WHITE-FRONTED and CACKLING GEESE, the AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN and BLACK-HEADED GULL, LAUGHING GULL, EASTERN PHOEBE, a BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER along with ORANGE-CROWNED and PINE, CHIPPING SPARROW and a count period a LAPLAND LONGSPUR.

The Smithtown Count Wednesday netted 109 species including 4 CACKLING GEESE, KING EIDER, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL, RAZORBILL, BARN and NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWLS, EASTERN PHOEBE, 2 ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS and 89 RUSTY BLACKBIRDS as well as count period RED-NECKED GREBE, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER and BLACK-HEADED GULL.

The Northern Westchester Count back on the 16th, among its 94 species, featured 32 BALD EAGLES, WILSON'S SNIPE, 4 NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWLS and MARSH WREN.

A GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was seen today in the clover leafs at the Belt Parkway and Flatbush Avenue intersection near Floyd Bennett Field. Two RED-NECKED GREBES have been at Jamaica Bay off Floyd Bennett recently. A ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK also reported there yesterday.

A GLAUCOUS GULL and 4 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were at the Bellport Bay Yacht Club Monday.

To phone in reports on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Saturday, December 23, 2017

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, December 22, 2017:

-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Dec. 22, 2017
* NYNY1712.22


- Birds Mentioned

PINK-FOOTED GOOSE+
MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD+
TOWNSEND’S SOLITAIRE+
WESTERN TANAGER+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Greater White-fronted Goose
“Black” Brant
Cackling Goose
Tundra Swan
Eurasian Wigeon
Blue-winged Teal
King Eider
BARROW'S GOLDENEYE
Red-necked Grebe
EARED GREBE
Common Gallinule
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Rough-legged Hawk
Semipalmated Plover
Lesser Yellowlegs
Razorbill
Black-legged Kittiwake
Iceland Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Glaucous Gull
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
Barn Owl
Snowy Owl
Short-eared Owl
Northern Saw-whet Owl
Merlin
Eastern Phoebe
Lapland Longspur
Northern Waterthrush
Orange-crowned Warbler
HOODED WARBLER
“AUDUBON’S” YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER
YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT
Clay-colored Sparrow
Vesper Sparrow
GRASSHOPPER SPARROW
Indigo Bunting
Rusty Blackbird
Baltimore Oriole
Pine Siskin

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44nybirdsorg

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, December 22, 2017 at 8:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD, WESTERN TANAGER, TOWNSEND’S SOLITAIRE, AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN, EARED GREBE, PINK-FOOTED GOOSE, BARROW'S GOLDENEYE, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, HOODED and “AUDUBON'S” YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS and much more.

The Christmas Count season, providing good coverage throughout much of our area, also usually produces some great birds, a perfect example being the MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD found during the Captree Count. The female-plumaged Bluebird was still present at least through yesterday at Democrat Point, the western tip of Fire Island, favoring a stand of Red Cedars along the bay side of the peninsula west of Parking Field 2. Please refer to the directions posted on the internet to find this bird.

The WESTERN TANAGER included on the Queen's Count continues at Crocheron Park around the pond at the south end of the park.

A TOWNSEND’S SOLITAIRE was spotted Wednesday near Oyster Bay along Sandy Hollow Road just north of the Tiffany Creek Preserve but has not been reported since.

Two AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS were spotted Sunday flying over Peconic Bay during the Quogue-Watermill Count, and then on Thursday afternoon one appeared on Playland Lake in Rye, where it remained all day today.

An EARED GREBE remains in Fire Island Inlet off the western end of Oak Beach Road.

A drake BARROW'S GOLDENEYE and a “BLACK” BRANT were seen from Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge last Friday, that same day finding four female KING EIDERS in Shinnecock Bay and two TUNDRA SWANS and a SHORT-EARED OWL at Hook Pond in Easthampton.

For last weekend's Christmas Counts, on a very windy Saturday the Montauk Count netted 122 species, including a PINK-FOOTED GOOSE still in that area and seen on Montauk Downs Golf Course. Also on that Count were two female KING EIDERS, three BALD EAGLES and three ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS, one GLAUCOUS, one LESSER BLACK-BACKED and two ICELAND GULLS, five RAZORBILLS, four SNOWY OWLS, NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, an ”AUDUBON'S” YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT and GRASSHOPPER SPARROW.

Kings County on Saturday among their 121 species featured two EURASIAN WIGEON, three RED-NECKED GREBES, a COMMON GALLINULE continuing in Prospect Park, BALD EAGLE, ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK, single BARN and SNOWY OWLS, GRASSHOPPER SPARROW, six ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS and two BALTIMORE ORIOLES.

On Saturday Northern Nassau tallied 94 species, with three CACKLING GEESE, seven BALD EAGLES, two SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, two MERLINS, and 21 RUSTY BLACKBIRDS.

During the better Sunday weather Captree netted 125 species, including CACKLING GOOSE, two LESSER YELLOWLEGS, two RAZORBILLS, two BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKES, two SNOWY and two NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWLS, LAPLAND LONGSPUR., two ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, PINE SISKIN and, of course, the MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD.

Queens on Sunday produced 123 species, highlights including BLUE-WINGED TEAL, YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, two BALD EAGLES, RAZORBILL, LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL, EASTERN PHOEBE, a male HOODED WARBLER, YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, INDIGO BUNTING, VESPER SPARROW and the celebrated WESTERN TANAGER.

Greenwich-Stamford, including parts of Westchester, netted 103 species, with CACKLING GOOSE, EURASIAN WIGEON, two RED-NECKED GREBES, OSPREY, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL and PINE SISKIN.

Other notables for the week included GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE at Belmont Lake State Park, Elda Lake in Babylon, Reeves Avenue in Riverhead and in Rye, Westchester County. Locations for EURASIAN WIGEON included the Salt Marsh Nature Center and Brooklyn Army Terminal Pier 4 on the Kings Count as well as on Patchogue Lake, Eastport Lake and Agawam Lake in South Hampton.

A GLAUCOUS GULL was in Bellport Bay Monday, an ICELAND Gull at Pelham Bay Park Wednesday. A dark ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK was photographed at Brooklyn’s Salt Marsh Nature Center Thursday, and a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW remains at the Suffolk County Farm and Education Center in Yaphank.

To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Thursday, December 21, 2017

Exploring urban nature, birds, birdwatching, birding, hummingbirds, butterflies, dragonflies, bees, hawks, raptors, wildflowers, trees, mushrooms, environment, binoculars, spotting scope