Saturday, November 20, 2010

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, November 19, 2010:

- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Nov. 19, 2010
* NYNY1011.19

- Birds mentioned

COMMON GROUND-DOVE+

(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE
Cackling Goose
EURASIAN WIGEON
Redhead
Common Eider
HARLEQUIN DUCK
Red-necked Grebe
Cattle Egret
Rough-legged Hawk
American Golden-Plover
Marbled Godwit
Iceland Gull
BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE
Royal Tern
Long-eared Owl
Northern Saw-whet Owl
WESTERN KINGBIRD
NORTHERN SHRIKE
Common Raven
Horned Lark
American Pipit
Lapland Longspur
Snow Bunting
ORCHARD ORIOLE
RED CROSSBILL
WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILL
Pine Siskin

EXTRALIMITAL - Stamford, Connecticut:

FORK-TAILED FLYCATCHER

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc3 AT nybirds.org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Jeanne Skelly - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
420 Chili-Scottsville Rd.
Churchville, NY 14428

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

To report sightings call:
Tom Burke (212) 372-1483 (weekdays, during the day)
Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 (Long Island)

Compiler: Tom Burke, Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, November 19th 2010 at 8pm. The highlights of today's tape are COMMON GROUND-DOVE, GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE, WESTERN KINGBIRD, NORTHERN SHRIKE, WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILL, RED CROSSBILL, HARLEQUIN DUCK, EURASIAN WIGEON, BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE, ORCHARD ORIOLE and an extralimital FORK-TAILED FLYCATCHER.

First, the only very slightly extralimital i.e. not in New York, FORK-TAILED FLYCATCHER, which was found Wednesday in Stamford Connecticut and was still present there today. To reach this site from New York, from the New England thruway, Route 95, take exit 9 and turn right or south onto Seaside Avenue, continue to the light at the end of the road and turn left onto Cove Road, the entrance to Cove Island Park is ahead, once into the park turn right and go past the skating rink and park in the southwest corner of the lot, the entrance to the sanctuary is on the left side of the brick building and the flycatcher has spent much of its time around the shrubs and small trees on the western side of the open area.

The COMMON GROUND-DOVE was still at Captree State Park this morning. Look for the dove especially on the short grass areas near the entrance booth or along the roadway to the south parking lot, this the first road to the right at the traffic circle. Also check along the north edge of the south parking lot though the Ground-Dove does sometimes move off into the dunes but does tend to return to the grass. The WESTERN KINGBIRD at the same site, at least through Monday, appears in the dunes around the south parking lot but seems to disappear after mid-morning.

At Jones Beach West End the NORTHERN SHRIKE was still being seen around the Roosevelt Nature Center as of today but has been rather elusive. A MARBLED GODWIT continues to appears either on the bar by the Coast Guard Station or across the inlet always with American Oystercatchers and LONG-EARED OWL and NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL have occurred at the West End recently. Last Saturday in the median at the West End the birders following up on a sighting of 2 RED CROSSBILLS found an immature male WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILL and single RED CROSSBILLS were noted there Tuesday and today with 2 LAPLAND LONGSPURS there Monday and today. An ICELAND GULL was also spotted at West End last Saturday and a couple of ROYAL TERNS continue to visit the Coast Guard bar. Among the waterfowl off the Coast Guard Station Sunday were 3 HARLEQUIN DUCKS.

Presently coastally in good numbers have been HORNED LARK, SNOW BUNTING and PINE SISKIN with scattered AMERICAN PIPITS.

A morning watch today at Robert Moses State Park from the hawk platform on Fire Island appeared 3 RED CROSSBILLS, 270 PINE SISKINS and 20 AMERICAN PIPITS.

Very unexpected last Saturday was an ORCHARD ORIOLE found at Zach's Bay north of field 6 at Jones Beach the oriole also there on Sunday.

AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER was still roosting at high tide in the Point Lookout Town Park parking lot as of Saturday and an immature BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE was feeding with a large flock of Bonaparte's Gulls off Cedar Beach overlook on Monday.

Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, a RED-NECKED GREBE was present in the bay south of the West Pond Sunday and 5 REDHEADS were on the pond.

Four CATTLE EGRETS were still at Floyd Bennett Field Sunday.

Up in Bayville a drake EURASIAN WIGEON was spotted Monday at the Bailey Arboretum off Bayville Road with another on Oyster Bay Mill Pond today. Two EURASIAN WIGEONS were seen at the south end of Patchogue Lake in Patchogue on Sunday.

Out in East Hampton the field on the north side of Further Lane that geese find so attractive did contain 5 GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE last Sunday a couple of these presumably the same 2 seen flying out of Hook Pond a little earlier. A CACKLING GOOSE was out on Shorts Pond off Scuttlehole Road in Bridgehampton and 3 CATTLE EGRET were still at the Mecox Dairy along Mecox Road Sunday with 2 more in Manorville.

At Shinnecock Inlet an immature BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE joined a feeding flock of Bonaparte's Gulls Sunday and 200 COMMON EIDER were scattered around the inlet.

Another ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK was spotted at Smith Point County Park in Shirley last Saturday. The same day a COMMON RAVEN was again observed at the Rocky Point Preserve.

To phone in reports on Long Island, call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126, or weekdays call Tom Burke at (212) 372-1483.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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