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Saturday, July 03, 2021

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, July 2, 2021:

-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* July 2, 2021
* NYNY2107.02


- Birds Mentioned

WHITE-WINGED DOVE+
PURPLE GALLINULE+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
WHIMBREL
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Least Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GULL-BILLED TERN
Royal Tern
Wilson’s Storm-Petrel
Great Shearwater
BROWN PELICAN
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
Acadian Flycatcher
Grasshopper Sparrow
BLUE GROSBEAK
DICKCISSEL


If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44nybirdsorg

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compiler: Tom Burke
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, July 2, 2021 at 8:00 pm.

The highlights of today's tape are BROWN PELICAN, WHITE-WINGED DOVE, PURPLE GALLINULE, WHIMBREL, GULL-BILLED TERN, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER, BLUE GROSBEAK, DICKCISSEL and more.

A somewhat slow week picked up nicely starting Wednesday when an east-bound adult BROWN PELICAN was first spotted off Cupsogue County Park in Westhampton Dunes early in the morning, the bird still slowly moving east as it passed Southampton beach just after 2:00 in the afternoon. Hopefully others will follow.

Also on Wednesday, a WHITE-WINGED DOVE was photographed visiting private feeders in the Landing Estates area of residential Hampton Bays; also present yesterday, there have been no reports from today.

And then Thursday, an adult PURPLE GALLINULE was spotted feeding along the western side of the East Pond at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, where it continued today. The bird has been frequenting the shore edge below the Big John’s Pond overlook, as viewed from the east side of the pond around or below the Raunt.

A GULL-BILLED TERN was also seen at Jamaica Bay Thursday, and last Saturday a WHIMBREL was photographed as it flew over the Visitor’s Center there. 2 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS were also at the Refuge last Saturday, while shorebirds also lingering in small numbers in our region recently have included SEMIPALMATED and BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, LEAST and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER, and LESSER and GREATER YELLOWLEGS. Southbound shorebirds should be moving in earnest shortly.

LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL numbers may have been declining lately along the coast, but ROYAL TERNS are on the increase.

Sea watching continues to be somewhat disappointing along Long Island’s south shore, with only single GREAT SHEARWATER and WILSON’S STORM-PETREL off Robert Moses State Park last Sunday and another GREAT and 13 WILSON’S there today.

A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER continues along the Paumonok Trail near Jones Pond in Manorville, this site on the west side of Schultz Road.

An ACADIAN FLYCATCHER was still singing in Prospect Park on Wednesday.

A few BLUE GROSBEAKS, along with some GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS and other desirable Grassland birds, continue in the very productive habitat around the former Grumman Airport in Calverton, an area that should be preserved.

Up to 3 male DICKCISSELS continue to sing around the top of the landfill at Croton Point Park, hopefully loud enough to attract some females.

To phone in reports call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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