Check out City Birder Tours, and Green-Wood sponsored tours on their calendar pages here.

Saturday, August 17, 2019

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, August 16, 2019:

- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Aug. 16, 2019
* NYNY1908.16

- Birds mentioned
BRIDLED TERN+
WHITE-WINGED DOVE+
SAY'S PHOEBE+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

GULL-BILLED TERN
CASPIAN TERN
BLACK TERN
WILSON'S PHALAROPE
Short-billed Dowitcher
Pectoral Sandpiper
White-rumped Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
MARBLED GODWIT
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Solitary Sandpiper
Whimbrel
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Red-headed Woodpecker
Eastern Kingbird
Bobolink
BLUE GROSBEAK
DICKCISSEL
Purple Martin
Cliff Swallow
Bank Swallow
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44 (at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, August 16th 2019 at 8pm. The highlights of today's tape are WHITE-WINGED DOVE, a probable SAY'S PHOEBE, BRIDLED TERN, WILSON'S PHALAROPE, MARBLED GODWIT, CASPIAN TERN, GULL-BILLED TERN, BLACK TERN, PROTHONOTARY WARBLER, DICKCISSEL, BLUE GROSBEAK and more.

Some decent early Fall like flight conditions occurring during the week produced a few very interesting birds. Watches last Saturday and Sunday mornings at Coney Island Creek in Brooklyn uncovered a PROTHONOTARY WARBLER seen on Saturday followed Sunday by a WHITE-WINGED DOVE photographed as it circled over Seagate before disappearing and out at Robert Moses State Park a flycatcher flying west passed two observers Saturday morning was by plumage thought to probably be a SAY'S PHOEBE. Unfortunately it moved by too quickly to be photographed. Also at Moses a DICKCISSEL was heard overhead both Saturday and Sunday and a BLUE GROSBEAK was recorded Saturday. Between these two sites a good variety of early Fall migrants included EASTERN KINGBIRD, PURPLE MARTIN, CLIFF and BANK SWALLOWS and a seasonal selection of warblers plus the occasional BOBOLINK and the like.

Out on Great Gull Island the adult BRIDLED TERN was spotted again Tuesday on the north side of the island. An immature BLACK TERN also appeared. The numbers of Common and Roseate Terns are now dropping quickly there so the BRIDLED'S continued stay may be limited.

In Central Park certainly the week's highlight was a male PROTHONOTARY WARBLER found today in the southeastern corner of the park at The Pond by the Hallett Sanctuary.

In the Bronx Jerome Reservoir was recently drained for repairs and the low water conditions have attracted a nice variety of shorebirds including 2 WILSON'S PHALAROPES spotted Wednesday and still present today. Also present since Wednesday have been a WHITE-RUMPED and 3 PECTORAL SANDPIPERS, some BLACK-BELLIED and SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, 2 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS plus GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS, mostly the latter, SOLITARY SANDPIPER and some SEMIPALMATED and LEAST SANDPIPERS. Unfortunately these conditions will be short lived as the refilling of the reservoir is imminent. A good place to park to view the reservoir is near the intersection of Webb Avenue and Reservoir Avenue.

Three MARBLED GODWITS were still noted at Cupsogue County Park in West Hampton Dunes yesterday and a WHIMBREL was out in Jamaica Bay last Saturday.

A GULL-BILLED TERN visited Brooklyn's Plumb Beach last Sunday and on Thursday 2 CASPIAN TERNS flying by Floyd Bennett Field were likely the 2 seen a little later at Plumb Beach.

A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER was spotted Monday at Rockefeller State Park in central Westchester County and a BLUE GROSBEAK was seen again around the Calverton Grasslands on Monday.

To phone in reports on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Treehugger Tuesday

From Earther:

It's Drone Vs. Raven as Scientists Fight to Save the Threatened Desert Tortoise
Yessenia Funes
August 7, 2019

This drone is on its way to a raven nest to kill some birds.
Photo: Courtesy of Tim Shields
Tim Shields spends a lot of time in the Mojave Desert. Sometimes, he camps out there for weeks at a time. As a desert biologist for nearly 40 years now, Shields doesn’t mind the extreme high and low temperatures that the California desert presents. He’d rather gaze at the desert night sky than a dull hotel room ceiling fan.

But he’s out there with a bigger purpose than staring at the sky. Shields’ is constantly searching for raven nests, often tucked in the branches of the Mojave’s signature Joshua tree. But the biologist isn’t exactly a raven expert; he’s a desert tortoise researcher. Unfortunately, ravens have become one of the threatened tortoise’s greatest threats. The jet black birds love to feast on baby tortoises whose shells are too soft to offer them much protection. Now, Shields is focused on how to reduce raven populations throughout the Mojave Desert to help tortoises reach reproductive age and, well, survive.

The key? Drones.

Click to read the entire article

Monday, August 12, 2019

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming birding and nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, August 17, 2019 to Sunday, August 18, 2019:

Brooklyn Bird Club
Sunday, August 18, 2019
Peak Shorebirds of Jamaica Bay Refuge
Leader: Peter Dorosh
Focus: Peak of shorebird species and waterbirds
Car Pool Fee: $10.00
Registrar: Peter Dorosh Prosbird@aol.com (or backup Prosbird@gmail.com)
Registration Period: Aug 10th – Aug 15th
Note: High tide 11:12 AM
Please review our trip guidelines here: http://brooklynbirdclub.org/information-registration

**********

Gateway National Park
Saturday, August 17, 2019, 10:00am — 11:00am
Birding for Beginners
Day(s): Every week on Saturday until September 28, 2019
View Details

Sunday, August 18, 2019, 10:00am — 11:30am
Osprey Watch Guided Walk
Day(s): Every week on Sunday until September 29, 2019
View Details

**********

Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, August 18, 2019, 6:30am - 8:00am
Birding in Peace
Before our gates open to the general public, birding expert Rob Jett leads these peaceful Sunday morning walking tours to discover the many birds that call Green-Wood home. Green-Wood’s official birding checklist is available to pick up from the security guard at the main entrance on 25th Street or to print here. Comfortable footwear is recommended.

Summer Birding
In July we should see the offspring of our resident red-tailed hawk bravely preparing to leave the nest. Warbler songs will be replaced by chirring Cicadas and the tweets of fledgling birds. Butterflies and dragonflies are abundant. By late-July, expect the arrival of the first southbound migrants.

$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members
Click here for our inclement weather policy.

**********

Hudson River Audubon Society
Sunday August 18, 2019, 8:00am
Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Meet at the refuge. We will bird the East Pond for shorebirds the day after the big shorebird festival
Expect water and mud. Bring high boots.
www.hras.org/wtobird/jamaicabaywildliferefuge.html

**********

Huntington-Oyster Bay Audubon Society
Sunday, August 18, 2019, 8:00am
Muttontown Preserve
The Preserve includes miles of marked nature trails with local wildflowers, trees, birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians.
Registration: 585-880-0915

Directions: Meet in the parking lot off of Muttontown Lane, which is on the south side of Route 25A, just west of Route 106 in East Norwich. Follow Muttontown Lane to the end.

**********

Linnaean Society of New York
Saturday, August 17, 2019
Jamaica Bay 26TH Annual Tom Davis Memorial Shorebird Walk
Leader: Sean Sime now Richard ZainEldeen
Registrar: Sean Sime now Anne Lazarus — amlazarus47@gmail.com or 212-673-9059
No Registration. Public transportation

**********

New York City Audubon
Saturday, August 17, 2019, 8:30am – 5:30pm
14th Annual Shorebird Festival at Jamaica Bay
With American Littoral Society, Gateway National Recreation Area, and Rockaway Waterfront Alliance

During the past 40 years, over 40 species of shorebirds (including rare and accidental vagrants) have been recorded at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge’s East and West Ponds from mid-July through October, with the greatest diversity and abundance in August. Join us for the 14th annual celebration on Saturday, August 17.

Programming includes guided hikes to the East and West Ponds, lectures by shorebird experts, kids activities, and more. Walk leaders include Kevin Karlson, Don Riepe, Lloyd Spitalnik, Gabriel Willow, and Molly Adams. The festival meets at the National Park Service's Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center (Google Map here). The program is free; suggested donations of $20 per adult to NYC Audubon are encouraged to offset festival costs.

Limited free van transportation from Manhattan to the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center is available for NYC Audubon members at the Student/Senior level and up. Meet at 71 West 23rd Street at 7:30am. Contact NYC Audubon at 212-691-7483 to reserve a seat. Limited van shuttle service will be available from the Broad Channel A Train Station to the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center until 10:30am. Free connection to the NYC Ferry at Beach 108th Street (early morning and end of the festival only). For more information, contact NYC Audubon at 212-691-7483, American Littoral Society at 718-474-0896, or Don Riepe at donriepe@gmail.com.

Sunday, August 18, 2019, 8:20am – 3:00pm
Croton Point Park, NY
Guide: Gabriel Willow
Meet at Grand Central Station and travel in comfort aboard Metro-North to visit Croton Point Park, a beautiful 500-acre park overlooking the Hudson River about one hour north of the city. The park is a wonderful mix of forest, wetlands, and grassland that are home to hard-to-find breeding bird species such as Indigo Bunting, Grasshopper Sparrow, Bobolink, and Eastern Meadowlark. The woodlands nearby are home to breeding Great Horned Owl, Willow Flycatcher, and Orchard Oriole, as well as the more expected common breeders. Bring lunch for a picnic in one of the riverside pavilions. Limited to 20. Round-trip Metro-North fare ($20.50) not included in trip price. $50 (35)
Click here to register

Sunday, August 18, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Birding Brooklyn Bridge Park
Guide: Heather Wolf
Meet at Pier 1 park entrance at the intersection of Old Fulton Street and Furman Street. Join Heather Wolf, author of Birding at the Bridge, for a picturesque bird walk along the Brooklyn waterfront. We'll look for breeding and nesting birds like the Gray Catbird, American Robin, Song Sparrow, and more. Visit www.nycaudubon.org/birding-bk-bridge to register. Limited to 19 per walk.
Free
Click here to register

Sunday, August 18, 2019, 2pm – 3pm
Governors Island Free Bird Walks
Saturdays, June 22, June 29, July 27, August 10 and August 24, 2-3pm
Sundays, June 16, July 21 and August 18, 2-3pm
Guide: NYC Audubon
Meet at Nolan Park House #17. Join us for a bird walk around beautiful and historic Governors Island, which boasts over 192 species recorded on ebird.org. Learn about the island’s fascinating history and search for waterbirds, raptors, waterfowl, and more. Binoculars are available. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

**********

New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

**********

Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Saturday, August 17, 2019, 3:00pm - 5:00pm
The Intertidal Zone at the Page Avenue Beach
We’ll begin with a look at the local geology then move to examining the flotsam and jetsam accumulated at the high tide lines to see what nature’s debris has to tell us. As the water recedes with the tide we’ll move into the intertidal zone to find out what sorts of living things survive in this challenging environment. A variety of crabs, snails, clams, worms and small fish are likely to be discovered. It’s sure to be muddy so dress appropriately.
Meet at the parking lot at the bottom of Page Avenue below Hylan Boulevard.
For more information phone Clay Wollney at 718-869-6327.

**********

Queens County Bird Club
Sunday, August 18, 2019
Jamaica Bay
Leader: Arie Gilbert (917) 693-7178
Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 175-10 Cross Bay Blvd, Broad Channel, NY 11693, USA (map)
Mini-trip that will end before lunch.
Wear knee-high waterproof boots because we will be exploring East Pond.
Please register via Eventbrite https://www.eventbrite.com/e/qcbc-jamaica-bay-east-pond-bird-walk-tickets-65124693712

**********

South Shore Audubon Society
Sunday, August 18, 2019
Norman J. Levy Park and Preserve
From the Meadowbrook Parkway, use the Merrick Road M9 east exit. Enter the Department of Sanitation entrance immediately on right (if you’re driving west on Merrick Road, make a U-turn after Central Boulevard and before the Meadowbrook Parkway). Look for signs to Levy Park and Preserve parking lot.
Directions via Google Maps

Bird walks led by a member of SSAS are conducted nearly every Sunday morning from late August through early June. Walks are open to the public and are free of charge. We especially encourage youngsters to attend.
All walks start at 9:00 A.M.
There is no walk if it rains or snows or temperature is below 25°F.
For more information or in case of questionable weather conditions, please phone Joe at 516 467-9498.


**********

Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, August 17, 2019
Rocking the Boat: Rowing and Birding at Hunts Point Riverside Park, Bronx
1:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Explore the Bronx River aboard student-built wooden rowboats, accompanied by staff who teach them about the local waterways.
Free!

White Island Sunset Canoe Trip (Advanced) at Marine Park, Brooklyn
5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Explore the waters of Gerritsen Creek and paddle by this special island where only wildflowers and wild birds reside. Prior canoe experience required. Registration ends on August 10.
Free!

Sunday, August 18, 2019
'Over The Hill' Hilltop Hike: Tallapoosa Point at Pelham Bay Park, Bronx
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
This area is now known as the old Pelham Bay landfill. The landfill remains closed to the public, making it a great viewing area for birds and other wildlife. Registration required.
Free!

**********

Wild Bird Fund
Sunday, August 18, 2019, 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Central Park Bat Walks with Ecologist Kaitlyn Parkins
Join WBF and New York ecologist Kaitlyn Parkins for an introductory presentation about bats at WBF Clinic, followed by a guided bat walk through Central Park. We hope to hear them with echo location, see them in flight and discuss their important role in our planet's ecosystem.
Kaitlyn's research and education biography can be found here: http://kaitlynparkins.com/.
When: Sunday, August 18 at 7:30pm at the WBF Center, then walk to Central Park. Event ends at 9:00pm.
Cost: $30…
Find out more »
...Read more

Saturday, August 10, 2019

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, August 9, 2019:

- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Aug. 9, 2019
* NYNY1908.09

- Birds mentioned
BRIDLED TERN+
AUDUBON'S SHEARWATER+
LEACH'S STORM-PETREL+
WHITE-FACED STORM-PETREL+
BROWN BOOBY+
BROWN PELICAN+
WHITE-WINGED DOVE+
MISSISSIPPI KITE+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Lesser Black-backed Gull
Caspian Tern
Royal Tern
Cory's Shearwater
BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETREL
Wilson's Storm-Petrel
Stilt Sandpiper
Red Knot
Pectoral Sandpiper
Sanderling
MARBLED GODWIT
HUDSONIAN GODWIT
Whimbrel
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER
Blue Grosbeak
Worm-eating Warbler
Blue-winged Warbler
Cerulean Warbler
Hooded Warbler

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44 (at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, August 9th 2019 at 9pm. The highlights of today's tape are a pelagic trip featuring WHITE-FACED STORM-PETREL, BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETREL, LEACH'S STORM-PETREL, AUDUBON'S SHEARWATER, BRIDLED TERN, BROWN BOOBY, BROWN PELICAN, WHITE-WINGED DOVE, MISSISSIPPI KITE, MARBLED GODWIT, HUDSONIAN GODWIT, RED-HEADED WOODPECKER and more.

The Great Gull Island BRIDLED TERN was still around on Monday but not roosting at its usual location and only seen in flight. Another BRIDLED TERN was spotted last Sunday from a private fishing boat about 60 miles or so south of Montauk at a site known as the Claw. Highlights of that trip certainly were the 2 WHITE-FACED STORM-PETRELS seen along with 1 BAND-RUMPED, 13 LEACH'S and 538 WILSON'S STORM-PETRELS, an AUDUBON'S, 3 GREAT and 4 CORY'S SHEARWATERS.

Last Saturday afternoon an immature BROWN BOOBY landed on the yard arm of the sloop the Clearwater as it sailed south on the Hudson River only leaving and flying north as the boat neared its Cold Spring destination. The BOOBY has not been relocated.

A BROWN PELICAN visited Jones Inlet yesterday initially feeding near and roosting on the tidal sandbar across the bay from the Coast Guard Station but then coming in to rest for awhile on the Coast Guard Station jetty before eventually flying off.

Nice finds but only seen briefly were a WHITE-WINGED DOVE photographed Monday morning as it sat in a dead pine tree along Bay Parkway a little west of Jones Beach field 10 and a MISSISSIPPI KITE identified Sunday as it passed over Hallock State Park Preserve in Northville on the north fork. The KITE heading south.

Shorebird migration continues but frustratingly without one of our regions most spectacular venues, the East Pond at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, where high water continues to deprive both birds and birders the use of this wonderful resource. Decent numbers of seasonal shorebirds have been gathering at Cupsogue County Park in West Hampton Dunes but a number of MARBLED GODWITS had risen to 5 as of yesterday. At Old Inlet last week's HUDSONIAN GODWIT was joined by a MARBLED GODWIT last weekend and other counts from there from Sunday featured 190 RED KNOTS, roughly 4,000 SANDERLINGS, 29 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS and 2 CASPIAN and 60 ROYAL TERNS. Two more MARBLED GODWITS were at Brooklyn's Plumb Beach today while some WHIMBREL noted this week included 4 at Old Inlet last Saturday and 17 flying by Jones Beach West End yesterday. Among the shorebirds noted at Jones Beach last Monday were single STILT and PECTORAL SANDPIPERS. Three CASPIAN TERNS did visit Jamaica Bay's East Pond last Sunday.

Two RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were still along the Paumanok Trail on the west side of Schultz Road north of Jones Pond in Manorville Monday and BLUE GROSBEAK was still present at the nearby Calverton Grasslands the same day.

Among the small but increasing number of migrating warblers this week were single CERULEAN WARBLERS reported from Central Park and Fort Washington Park and such other regionally breeding species as WORM-EATING, BLUE-WINGED and HOODED.

To phone in reports on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Tuesday, August 06, 2019

Treehugger Tuesday

From the website mnn.com:

Irish teen wins Google Science Fair with project to remove microplastics from water
Ben Bolton
August 1, 2019, 12:38 p.m.



Google Science Fair launched in 2011 as a way to challenge students around the globe to figure out solutions to some of the world's largest problems, and this year's winner focused on a problem we're still wrapping our arms around: microplastics.

Fionn Ferreira, an 18-year-old Irish student, earned the $50,000 prize through a simple desire to help the planet. He was one of 24 finalists from 14 countries who went to Google headquarters to present their projects.

Ferreira from West Cork, Ireland, developed a novel approach to extracting microplastics from water, with the greater goal of creating a method to clean our oceans.

The video below is a closer look at Ferreira's demonstration of how he used a ferrofluid (oil and magnetite) and magnets to clean a sample of water.


You can explore Ferreira's science fair project at the Google Science Fair project page. Beyond the science, it explains his motivation for the project, which stems from growing up near the coast and his love of nature.

He tested 10 different types of microplastic suspensions and found that he could remove 85% or more of the microplastic contents in his samples.

Ultimately, a reduction in the amount of plastic the world uses on a daily basis is the best solution, but this project proves there are new, creative ways to clean the water we've already polluted.

Lawmakers in Ireland currently have plans to introduce legislation that will outlaw the sale, manufacturing, import and export of products containing microplastics.

For his efforts, Ferreira was awarded $50,000 in scholarship money. He would like to study chemistry or chemical engineering in Ireland or in Europe. He currently works as a curator at the local Schull Planetarium, is fluent in three languages, is a skilled trumpet player, and has won 12 science fair awards.

As he described in his project page, it's the next step of the process that opens doors: "... winning a prize would give my project more attention and let it grow with mentorship to solve a real problem on the Earth. There is nothing I would like to see more than my project and idea to be used in real life applications and I think a prize could do this."

For any young scientists itching to explore their own idea, your chance will come. The project submission window typically runs for a couple of months starting in September and ending in December. And as this year's callout to young scientists reminds us, every great idea starts somewhere.

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming birding and nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, August 10, 2019 to Sunday, August 11, 2019:

Feminist Bird Club
Saturday, August 10, 2019
Breeding Birds of Freshkills with Shannon Curley

All walks follow the ABA Code of Birding Ethics

**********

Gateway National Park
Saturday, August 10, 2019, 10:00am — 11:00am
Birding for Beginners
Day(s): Every week on Saturday until September 28, 2019
View Details

Sunday, August 11, 2019, 10:00am — 11:30am
Osprey Watch Guided Walk
Day(s): Every week on Sunday until September 29, 2019
View Details

**********

New York City Audubon
Saturday, August 10, 2019, 2pm – 3pm
Governors Island Free Bird Walks
Saturdays, June 22, June 29, July 27, August 10 and August 24, 2-3pm
Sundays, June 16, July 21 and August 18, 2-3pm
Guide: NYC Audubon
Meet at Nolan Park House #17. Join us for a bird walk around beautiful and historic Governors Island, which boasts over 192 species recorded on ebird.org. Learn about the island’s fascinating history and search for waterbirds, raptors, waterfowl, and more. Binoculars are available. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Sunday, August 11, 2019, 9:30am – 11:30am
Birding at Wave Hill
Sundays May 12, June 9, July 14, August 11, September 8, 9:30-11:30am
Guide: Gabriel Willow with Wave Hill
Meet at the Perkins Visitor Center. Naturalist Gabriel Willow contributes his extensive knowledge of bird species and their behaviors on these captivating walks. Wave Hill’s garden setting overlooking the Hudson River flyway provides the perfect habitat for resident and migrating birds. Walks run rain or shine. Ages 10 and up welcome with an adult. No registration required. No limit. NYC Audubon members enjoy two-for-one admission (see www.wavehill.org for more information)

**********

New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

**********

New York City WILD!
Saturday August 10, 2019, 11:00am
Whale and Dolphin Watching on the American Princess, Riis Landing, Queens

Sunday, August 11, 2019, 5:00pm
Summer Sunsets: Port Imperial Promenade, NJ

For the full information about each walk click HERE

**********

Newtown Historical Society
Sunday, August 11, 2019
Ridgewood Reservoir
Newtown Historical Society is offering a special nature and history tour of the Ridgewood Reservoir starting at 10am in the main parking lot on Vermont Place at Highland Park. We will view the historic structures in the recently renovated park, observe the natural world and discuss its future.

You can take public transportation to Highland Park. The B13 bus stops along Cypress Hills Street and the Q56 stops along Jamaica Avenue. The Cleveland Street stop on the J train is 3 blocks from the park. Or, you can drive or bike.

This tour will be led by special guest Rob Jett, author of The City Birder.

This tour is 100% FREE and will be a great experience for children and adults alike. For more info or to RSVP, write to NewtownHistory@gmail.com or call 718-366-3715.

**********

Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, August 10, 2019
Rocking the Boat: Rowing and Birding at Hunts Point Riverside Park, Bronx
1:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Explore the Bronx River aboard student-built wooden rowboats, accompanied by staff who teach them about the local waterways.
Free!

Sunday, August 11, 2019
Summer Birding at Perkins Visitors Center (in Wave Hill), Bronx
9:30 a.m.–11:00 a.m.
Naturalist Gabriel Willow contributes his extensive knowledge of diverse bird species and their behavior on these walks through the gardens and woodlands.
...Read more

Saturday, August 03, 2019

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, August 2, 2019:

-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Aug. 2, 2019
* NYNY1908.02

- Birds Mentioned

BROWN BOOBY+
BRIDLED TERN+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

BROWN PELICAN
Tricolored Heron
WHIMBREL
HUDSONIAN GODWIT
MARBLED GODWIT
Pectoral Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
CASPIAN TERN
BLACK TERN
Royal Tern
Purple Martin
Bank Swallow
Cerulean Warbler
DICKCISSEL
Purple Finch

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, August 2, 2019 at 8:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are BROWN BOOBY, BROWN PELICAN, a BRIDLED TERN update, MARBLED and HUDSONIAN GODWITS, WHIMBREL, RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, BLACK and CASPIAN TERNS, DICKCISSEL and more.

An immature BROWN BOOBY was spotted last Saturday during a whale watching cruise as the boat was out between Breezy Point and Sandy Hook, NJ; on Sunday mid-day what may have been the same bird was photographed as it sat on the beach at Heckscher State Park’s Field 7, this followed by a report Tuesday off Fire Island. There have been no reports since, but this is one to be on the lookout for.

Early in the week there were also a few BROWN PELICANS noted along the Atlantic coastline, including Sunday sightings of two off mid-Fire Island and another early off Gilgo’s Overloook Beach, a report from Cupsogue County Park in Westhampton Dunes Monday, and on Tuesday evening one off Miller Field on Staten Island. Watch for PELICANS around the inlets and bays as well as offshore.

As a note, the adult BRIDLED TERN was last seen by tern personnel on Great Gull Island back on Thursday August 25th.

As shorebird season continues to build, most welcome were three MARBLED GODWITS spotted at Cupsogue County Park on Thursday, these hopefully to continue there for a while, while out on Fire Island an adult HUDSONIAN GODWIT found at the Fire Island Wilderness on Wednesday was still present today.

A RED-NECKED PHALAROPE was spotted swimming just beyond the surf at Smith Point County Park in Shirley early this afternoon.

A reasonable number of WHIMBRELS recently have included three at Breezy Point Wednesday and, on Thursday, two at Robert Moses State Park and singles at Plumb Beach and Coney Island Creek in Brooklyn, as well as at Jacob Riis Park today.

Recently at Cupsogue County Park, last Saturday produced a PECTORAL SANDPIPER, two *hendersoni *SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS and a BLACK TERN, as well as a good assortment of expected shorebirds, and two CASPIAN TERNS appeared there on Tuesday. ROYAL TERNS are also gathering at various sites along the coast.

Two TRICOLORED HERONS were still around the Captree Island marsh last Saturday.

Only a modest number of landbirds have been on the move recently, but a noteworthy one was a DICKCISSEL flying by Robert Moses State Park early Tuesday morning.

Also moving have been family groups of PURPLE MARTINS and some BANK SWALLOWS; but unexpected were a PURPLE FINCH at Cupsogue Saturday and a female CERULEAN WARBLER in Manhattan’s Riverside Park, also last Saturday. More passerines will be coming soon.

To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734 4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

Treehugger Tuesday

From Oklahoman.com:

Struggle resumes over whether lesser prairie chicken needs federal protection
by Chris Casteel
Published: Sun, July 28, 2019 1:06 AM
Updated: Sun, July 28, 2019 1:29 AM

Nearly two years after the U.S. government dropped its effort to list the lesser prairie chicken as a threatened species, Oklahoma lawmakers are again pushing back against the prospect of federal protection for the bird.

U.S. Sens. Jim Inhofe and James Lankford, both Oklahoma Republicans, penned a letter this month urging the Secretary of Interior to consider voluntary conservation measures before making a “rush to judgment” on listing the bird under the Endangered Species Act.

Referring to a five-state, voluntary range plan that includes oil and gas companies, utilities, farmers and other private landowners, the lawmakers said in the letter that “it is imperative that you provide the fullest and fairest opportunity for such private conservation plans to succeed.”

Some fear that listing the lesser prairie chicken as an endangered species could curtail energy and agricultural activities within the bird’s habitat, which includes parts of western Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas, New Mexico and Colorado. The range plan was designed to accommodate the bird and industry.

A report released in March by the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies estimated the bird’s population at 38,637, an increase of 29% from the previous year.

The report says the population has been trending upward since the range plan was implemented about five years ago.

The Oklahoma senators’ letter, also signed by U.S. senators from Kansas, Colorado and Texas, says more than 7 million acres have been enrolled in the conservation plan by the private sector.

However, three environmental groups filed a federal lawsuit in June aimed at pushing the Trump administration to evaluate the lesser prairie chicken, a member of the grouse family, for federal protection.

The lawsuit claims the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service should have completed a study already.

The lawsuit states, “The species once numbered around a million birds, but today there are fewer than 38,000 lesser prairie chickens remaining. Conversion to agriculture, the introduction of cattle, and the construction of roads, pipelines, powerlines, and drilling pads to support the oil and gas industry have fragmented the bird’s preferred habitat, separated individuals from lek (courtship) sites, and driven a sharp reduction in numbers.”

Jason Rylander, senior counsel at Defenders of Wildlife, one of the groups that sued the Fish and Wildlife Service, said last month, “The iconic lesser prairie chicken could go extinct if we do not take meaningful steps to save it.

“Endangered Species Act protection could make all the difference, but the Trump administration refuses to act. The lesser prairie chicken has waited long enough for a decision.”

Inhofe praises five-state plan

The struggle over the lesser prairie chicken predates the Trump administration by many years. It goes back to the 1990s. It wasn't until the Obama administration that the bird's status was enough of a priority to merit a designation under the Endangered Species Act.

The voluntary range plan was developed while the Obama administration considered listing the lesser prairie chicken as threatened or endangered. Inhofe worked with private companies and wildlife officials from several states to develop the voluntary conservation plan to avoid the federal listing.

Inhofe said this week that the Obama effort was “rushed” and “purely political.”

“I fought them at every turn, and, in 2016 the courts recognized that the local efforts were ignored in favor of federal overreach and delisted the lesser prairie chicken,” Inhofe said.

“Since then, the five-state plan has been successful and we’ve seen population growth of over 50% across the species’ range.”

Inhofe was referring to a federal judge’s ruling in 2016 that the Fish and Wildlife Service had not adequately considered the voluntary range plan when it listed the lesser prairie chicken as threatened. The judge’s ruling effectively delisted the bird, and the Obama administration declined to pursue further action.

Defenders of Wildlife and other groups petitioned the Fish and Wildlife Service in 2016 to restart the process. In its initial response, the service said listing the bird as endangered might be justified.

The lawsuit filed last month by the environmental groups contends the service has exceeded the 12-month limit for making a determination.

In a statement to The Oklahoman, the Fish and Wildlife Service said this week that it will make its 12-month finding regarding the lesser prairie chicken in fiscal year 2021.

The timetable factors in “numerous conservation plans in development with representatives from the agriculture, wind energy, and oil and gas energy sectors,” the service stated.

“When evaluating the status of the LPC, the Service will use the best available information to characterize the current and future condition of the LPC, taking into account both threats and conservation efforts.

“We are currently working with our partners to ensure there are viable conservation options in place for the lesser prairie chicken."

Inhofe said he has been working with the Trump administration “and will keep the pressure on the Fish and Wildlife Service to make sure that they follow the law by putting voluntary conservation efforts first.”

Congress included a provision in the Interior Department spending bill last year, Inhofe said, requiring the Fish and Wildlife Service “to prioritize voluntary state and local conservation over a federal listing” under the Endangered Species Act.

The environmental groups suing the Trump administration say the lesser prairie chicken is also endangered by climate change.

"Overall, global warming is expected to drive a four-fold increase in the number of 100-plus degree days on the Southern Plains," the groups said. "A 2017 U.S. Geological Survey study found that lesser prairie chickens will move closer to extinction as climate change worsens and more habitat is lost."

Jacob Malcolm, with Defenders of Wildlife, said the population increase was driven by a temporary rise in precipitation. The Range Wide Plan didn't increase the amount of habitat significantly — rather, the enrolled acreage is habitat that hasn't been lost, Malcolm said.

**********

Note: The IUCN Red List has assessed this species conservation status as "Vulnerable".
...Read more

Monday, July 29, 2019

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming birding and nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, August 3, 2019 to Sunday, August 4, 2019:

Bedford Audubon Society
Sunday, August 4, 2019, 10:00am - 3:00pm
Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Where can you see migrating shorebirds such herons and egrets?
On a Field Trip to Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge! Join Naturalist Tait Johansson for high tide at the bay at the peak of shorebird migration at the refuge’s East Pond. We are also likely to see Glossy Ibis and many others! Bring binoculars, lunch, sunscreen, plenty of cold drinks, and boots/footwear so you won’t mind getting muddy.
Depart Bylane 8:30am or meet at Visitor’s Center at 10:00am
Cost: Free
Level of difficulty: Easy to moderate
Please register with Susan at info@bedfordaudubon.org or 914-302-9713
See more details

**********

Brooklyn Bird Club
Saturday, August 3, 2019
Early Morning Shorebirds of Jamaica Bay Refuge and Afternoon Butterflies of Shirley Chisholm State Park
Leader: Peter Dorosh
Focus: Shorebird species and waterbirds; butterflies and dragonflies
Car Pool Fee: $10.00
Registrar: Peter Dorosh Prosbird@aol.com (or backup Prosbird@gmail.com)
Registration Period: July 27th - Aug 1st
Note: High tide is 11:08 AM. After lunch the group will visit the brand new park Shirley Chisholm State Park for the BBC’s debut visit, with a focus on butterflies […]

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Gateway National Park
Saturday, August 3, 2019, 10:00am — 11:00am
Birding for Beginners
Day(s): Every week on Saturday until September 28, 2019
View Details

Sunday, August 4, 2019, 10:00am — 11:30am
Osprey Watch Guided Walk
Day(s): Every week on Sunday until September 29, 2019
View Details

**********

Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, August 4, 2019, 6:00am - 7:30am
Birding in Peace
Before our gates open to the general public, birding expert Rob Jett leads these peaceful Sunday morning walking tours to discover the many birds that call Green-Wood home. Green-Wood’s official birding checklist is available to pick up from the security guard at the main entrance on 25th Street or to print here. Comfortable footwear is recommended.

Summer Birding
In July we should see the offspring of our resident red-tailed hawk bravely preparing to leave the nest. Warbler songs will be replaced by chirring Cicadas and the tweets of fledgling birds. Butterflies and dragonflies are abundant. By late-July, expect the arrival of the first southbound migrants.

$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members
Click here for our inclement weather policy.

**********

Linnaean Society of New York
Saturday, August 3, 2019
Central Park Horticultural Walk
Leader: Regina Alvarez — information only regina.alvarez@gmail.com
No registration. Public transportation
Meet at NE corner of 103rd Street and Central Park West, 10 am

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New York City Audubon
Sunday, August 4, 2019, 10am – 1pm
Shorebird Identification Workshop
Friday, August 2, 6:30-8:30pm (class)
Sunday, August 4, 10am-1pm (trip)
Instructor: Joe Giunta, Happy Warblers LLC
Shorebirds are one of the most challenging groups of birds to identify, yet beautiful and fascinating once they can be distinguished. Learn to identify plovers and sandpipers (including "peeps") by learning behavior, field marks, and calls—then take a field trip to Jamaica Bay to practice your new skills. Limited to 12. $65 (45)
Click here to register

**********

New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

**********

New York City WILD!
Saturday, August 3, 2019, 10:00am
NEW! EXPLORE! Save the DATE! Constitution Marsh Audubon Center Canoe Paddle, Cold Spring, NY

Sunday, August 4, 2019, 4:00pm
Bridges of New York Sunset Walk: George Washington Bridge and Fort Lee Park, NJ

For the full information about each walk click HERE

**********

North Fork Audubon Society
Saturday, August 3, 2019, 8:00am
Shorebird Migration
Cedar beach is "the spot" for shorebird watching. Tom can guarantee you'll see whimbrel on this trip. So come and see one for yourself!
Meet at The Red House at Inlet Pond County Park Greenport at 8AM (The walk will be about 2 hours)
Call or text Tom at (631)275-3202 or email him at tdamiani3optimum.net to register for the walk.
Suggested donation is $4 for nonmembers

**********

Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, August 3, 2019
Rocking the Boat: Rowing and Birding at Hunts Point Riverside Park, Bronx
1:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Explore the Bronx River aboard student-built wooden rowboats, accompanied by staff who teach them about the local waterways.
Free!

Sunday, August 4, 2019
Queens Park of the Month: Birding at Brookville Park at Brookville Boulevard and Caney Road (in Brookville Park), Queens
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
This park in southeast Queens is a popular landing location for migrating birds.
Free!
...Read more

Saturday, July 27, 2019

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, July 26, 2019:

-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* July 26, 2019
* NYNY1907.26

- Birds Mentioned

BRIDLED TERN+
BLACK-CAPPED PETREL+
LEACH’S STORM-PETREL+
BAND-RUMPED STORM-PETREL+
GRAY KINGBIRD+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Cory’s Shearwater
Great Shearwater
MANX SHEARWATER
AUDUBON’S SHEARWATER
Wilson’s Storm-Petrel
Tricolored Heron
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
WHIMBREL
Stilt Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Laughing Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GULL-BILLED TERN
CASPIAN TERN
Royal Tern
Purple Martin
Cliff Swallow
Worm-eating Warbler
Louisiana Waterthrush
Northern Waterthrush
Blue-winged Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
Prairie Warbler
SUMMER TANAGER

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to: view

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke and Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Gail Benson

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, July 26, 2019 at 9:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape are GRAY KINGBIRD, BRIDLED TERN, pelagic trip results including BLACK-CAPPED PETREL, BAND-RUMPED and LEACH’S STORM-PETRELS, AUDUBON’S and MANX SHEARWATERS, WHIMBREL and nice mammals, GULL-BILLED and CASPIAN TERNS, YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, SUMMER TANAGER, and early fall migrants.

Last Sunday morning a GRAY KINGBIRD was photographed as it briefly perched atop a sign at Smith Point County Park in Shirley. The bird has not been relocated once it flew off towards the bay.

The BRIDLED TERN roosting on Great Gull Island was still present today; favoring the northeast side of the island, the bird can be viewed by boat, but landing on this important tern research island is not permitted.

A pelagic trip sponsored by See Life Paulagics aboard the Brooklyn VI on Monday visited quite warm waters out at the continental shelf, where some great birds and mammals were encountered. Not yet official trip totals featured 3 BLACK-CAPPED PETRELS, 17 BAND-RUMPED, 26 LEACH’S and about 600 WILSON’S STORM-PETRELS, 2 AUDUBON’S, 1 MANX, 4 GREAT, and 6 CORY’S SHEARWATERS, a juvenile LAUGHING GULL, and 11 WHIMBRELS and other migrating shorebirds. Mammal highlights included numerous Atlantic Spotted and Offshore Bottlenose Dolphins riding the bow, a large group of Risso’s Dolphins, and a wonderful pod of Cuvier’s Beaked Whales.

Back on shore, the first wave of the southbound shorebird migration continues, though we are unfortunately missing out on the wonderful opportunities the East Pond at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge usually provides, as high water there continues to be a problem.

Single WHIMBREL were noted this week at Robert Moses State Park on Monday and at Plumb Beach in Brooklyn on Wednesday. Three STILT SANDPIPERS were at Wolf’s Pond Park on Staten Island last Sunday, and other shorebirds noted this week have included GREATER and LESSER YELLOWLEGS, SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER, SEMIPALMATED, LEAST, SOLITARY and SPOTTED SANDPIPERS and other expected species. This early part of shorebird migration, featuring mostly adults, provides the best window for foreign vagrants, but it will be closing soon.

A LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL was spotted at Breezy Point Monday evening, and among the TERNS, a CASPIAN was off Robert Moses State Park Monday, a GULL-BILLED paid an unusual visit to Cupsogue County Park in Westhampton Dunes Thursday, and ROYAL numbers continue to grow.

A TRICOLORED HERON was seen in the Captree Island marsh today.

Singing and presumably still nesting land birds include the YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER at Bayard Cutting Arboretum reportedly heard today and a SUMMER TANAGER on territory out in Northwest Harbor last Sunday.

Recent migrant land birds have included PURPLE MARTIN and CLIFF SWALLOW, and, among the WARBLERS, BLUE-WINGED, BLACKBURNIAN, PRAIRIE, BLACK-AND-WHITE, WORM-EATING and NORTHERN and LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSHES, these all breeding not far north of the City.

To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734 4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Treehugger Tuesday

From New Atlas:

Study shows that dropped cigarette butts harm plants
Ben Coxworth
July 19th, 2019

Pots of white clover, seven days after a butt-shaped piece of wood was added (left) and an actual cigarette butt (right)(Credit: Jaime Da Silva Carvalho, Anglia Ruskin University)

Although many smokers apparently don't realize it (or just don't care), cigarette butts are very much a form of litter – in fact, they're the world's most common type of litter. And they're not just an eyesore, as new research now indicates that they also dramatically reduce plant growth.

In a study led by researchers from Britain's Anglia Ruskin University, butts from regular and menthol cigarettes (both smoked and unsmoked) were placed on soil in which either ryegrass or white clover plants were being grown – both are important forage crops for livestock, and also make up much of the ground cover in urban parks. The clover in particular is claimed to be "ecologically important for pollinators and nitrogen fixation."

Regardless of the type of butt, after 21 days it was found that their presence reduced the germination success and shoot length of the clover by an average of 27 and 28 percent respectively, and the root biomass by 57 percent. In the case of the grass, the germination success was reduced by 10 percent, and the shoot length by 13 percent. A separate group of plants, which had butt-shaped pieces of wood added to their soil over the same period, served as a control.

Given that there was little difference between the effect of butts from smoked and unsmoked cigarettes, it was determined that the problem likely lies in the cellulose acetate fiber used in the filters. More specifically, plasticizer chemicals which are used to make that material more flexible may be leaching into the soil.

"In some parks, particularly surrounding benches and bins, we found over 100 cigarette butts per square meter," says lead scientist Dr. Dannielle Green. "Dropping cigarette butts seems to be a socially acceptable form of littering and we need to raise awareness that the filters do not disappear and instead can cause serious damage to the environment."

Monday, July 22, 2019

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming birding and nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, July 27, 2019 to Sunday, July 28, 2019:

Bedford Audubon Society
Sunday, July 28, 2019, 10:00am - 12:00pm
Dragonflies of Muscoot Farm
Dragonfllies and Damselflies are NOT twins! Can you tell the difference?
Join Naturalist Tait Johansson and Friends of Muscoot Farm for a Nature Walk focused on Dragonflies of Muscoot Farm. This is a favorite walk and there is always lots to see while wandering the beautiful grounds of Muscoot Farm.
Meet at the back of the main parking lot.
Level of difficulty: Easy
Cost: Free
Visit our website at www.bedfordaudubon.org for a schedule of events.
See more details

**********

Gateway National Park
Saturday, July 27, 2019, 10:00am — 11:00am
Birding for Beginners
Day(s): Every week on Saturday until September 28, 2019
View Details

Sunday, July 28, 2019, 10:00am — 11:30am
Osprey Watch Guided Walk
Day(s): Every week on Sunday until September 29, 2019
View Details

**********

Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, July 28, 2019, 6:00am - 7:30am
Birding in Peace
Before our gates open to the general public, birding expert Rob Jett leads these peaceful Sunday morning walking tours to discover the many birds that call Green-Wood home. Green-Wood’s official birding checklist is available to pick up from the security guard at the main entrance on 25th Street or to print here. Comfortable footwear is recommended.

Summer Birding
In July we should see the offspring of our resident red-tailed hawk bravely preparing to leave the nest. Warbler songs will be replaced by chirring Cicadas and the tweets of fledgling birds. Butterflies and dragonflies are abundant. By late-July, expect the arrival of the first southbound migrants.

$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members
Click here for our inclement weather policy.

**********

Linnaean Society of New York
Sunday, July 28, 2019
Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge
Leader: Richard ZainEldeen
Registrar: Ellen Hoffman — ellenh33@icloud.com or 917-903-3486
Registration opens: Monday, July 15
Ride: $15 or public transportation

**********

New York City Audubon
Sunday, July 28, 2019, 2pm – 3pm
Governors Island Free Bird Walks
Saturdays, June 22, June 29, July 27, August 10 and August 24, 2-3pm
Sundays, June 16, July 21 and August 18, 2-3pm
Guide: NYC Audubon
Meet at Nolan Park House #17. Join us for a bird walk around beautiful and historic Governors Island, which boasts over 192 species recorded on ebird.org. Learn about the island’s fascinating history and search for waterbirds, raptors, waterfowl, and more. Binoculars are available. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

**********

New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

**********

New York City WILD!
Saturday, July 27, 2019, 10:00am
NEW! Hardscrabble Ramble #4: Gowanus Canal, Brooklyn

For the full information about each walk click HERE

**********

Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Sunday, July 28, 2019, 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Acme Pond
The woodlands and ponds of this little known area will be explored during an approximately two mile hike. Once heavily farmed, the Acme Pond area has developed into a nicely wooded forest over the past 150 years with sweetgum, white oaks and hickories as the dominant trees. The pond is reputed to be the home of large bass and provides a secluded location for many birds as well as birds and turtles.
Meet at the corner of Hylan Boulevard, and Holten Avenue.
For more information phone Clay Wollney at (718)869-6327.

**********

Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, July 27, 2019
Rocking the Boat: Rowing and Birding at Hunts Point Riverside Park, Bronx
1:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Explore the Bronx River aboard student-built wooden rowboats, accompanied by staff who teach them about the local waterways.
Free!
...Read more

Saturday, July 20, 2019

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, July 19, 2019:

-RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* July 19, 2019
* NYNY1907.19

- Birds Mentioned
BRIDLED TERN+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

SANDHILL CRANE
Semipalmated Plover
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Whimbrel
Royal Tern
BROWN PELICAN

+If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

Compilers: Tom Burke, Tony Lauro, and Shai Mitra
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Shai Mitra (Posted by Ben Cacace)

[~BEGIN RBA TAPE~]

Greetings! This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, July 19, 2019 at 5:00 pm.

The highlights of today’s tape include continuing SANDHILL CRANE and BRIDLED TERN, BROWN PELICANS, and other seasonal seabirds and shorebirds.

The BRIDLED TERN that has been residing near the Great Gull Island tern colony was reported most recently on Friday. It is very likely still present at this sensitive site, where researchers are currently very busy with their field work and less able to search for and report this long-staying rarity. Similarly the SANDHILL CRANE at Napeague has been reported at least through Saturday.

July has historically been the best month for BROWN PELICANS on Long Island, and we have been treated to more than the usual number of records already this year. On Saturday alone, BROWN PELICANS were reported from at least four sites along the Suffolk County ocean shore, with the highest count being four, at Moriches Inlet. Less unusual but nevertheless impressive, ROYAL TERNS have been building along the south shore, with as many as 32 at Old Inlet on Monday.

Shorebird migration is in full swing now, with such species as SEMIPALMATED PLOVER and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER appearing now in large numbers. Reports from Jamaica Bay have indicated that the water level at the East Pond is still high, but birders searching farther afield have produced many reports of scarcer species, such as PECTORAL SANDPIPERS at Plumb Beach and Nickerson Beach on Thursday, SOLITARY SANDPIPERS at the Bronx Zoo on Tuesday, Jerome Park Reservoir on Thursday, and West Brook Pond Tuesday through today. WHIMBRELS have been widely reported on Long Island in the past week, from both the North and South Shores, with a high count of seven at Captree State Park on Wednesday.

To phone in reports, on Long Island call Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 or call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript
...Read more

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Treehugger Tuesday

From the website mnn.com:

One of New Zealand's rarest parakeets is having a banner breeding season
Mary Jo DiLonardo
July 18, 2019

New Zealand's orange-fronted parakeets, or kākāriki karaka, are small birds that live in the forest. Only about 7 to 8 inches (19-22 centimeters) long, these are the country's rarest parakeet with just 100 to 300 birds estimated left in the wild.

But there's been some great news this year for the long-tailed bird with the yellow crown and the orange nose band. The parakeet is having its best breeding season in decades, the New Zealand Department of Conservation reports.

This year, at least 150 chicks were born in the wild, potentially doubling the population.

Department of Conservation staff members have found 31 kākāriki karaka nests in the wild in Canterbury this season — which is more than three times the number found in recent years — and nesting season is expecting to continue for several months.

Minister of Conservation Eugenie Sage said the breeding boom was due to a wealth of beech seeds, which are a popular part of the birds' diet.

"This budgie sized native bird, a taonga species for Ngāi Tahu, eats plants and insects, and during a mast year, seeds dominate their diet. This year's beech mast is looking like the biggest in more than 40 years," Sage said in a statement.

"There has been so much seed on the beech trees the birds just keep on breeding with some parakeet pairs onto their fifth clutch of eggs. When there's no beech mast they typically have just one or two clutches."

The parakeets, which were threatened due to habitat destruction and introduced predators, have been part of a recovery effort that includes captive breeding programs and predator control. At one point, they were thought to be extinct before being rediscovered in Canterbury in 1993, reports the Department of Conservation.

Want to see the little birds for yourself? Here's some recent trail camera footage of the parakeets in their nests:

Monday, July 15, 2019

Upcoming Birding and Nature Trips

Below is a list of upcoming birding and nature trips by local birding/conservation groups for Saturday, July 20, 2019 to Sunday, July 21, 2019:

Gateway National Park
Saturday, July 20, 2019, 10:00am — 11:00am
Birding for Beginners
Day(s): Every week on Saturday until September 28, 2019
View Details

Sunday, July 21, 2019, 10:00am — 11:30am
Osprey Watch Guided Walk
Day(s): Every week on Sunday until September 29, 2019
View Details

**********

Green-Wood Cemetery
Sunday, July 21, 2019, 6:00am - 7:30am
Birding in Peace
Before our gates open to the general public, birding expert Rob Jett leads these peaceful Sunday morning walking tours to discover the many birds that call Green-Wood home. Green-Wood’s official birding checklist is available to pick up from the security guard at the main entrance on 25th Street or to print here. Comfortable footwear is recommended.

Summer Birding
In July we should see the offspring of our resident red-tailed hawk bravely preparing to leave the nest. Warbler songs will be replaced by chirring Cicadas and the tweets of fledgling birds. Butterflies and dragonflies are abundant. By late-July, expect the arrival of the first southbound migrants.

$10 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $15 for non-members
Click here for our inclement weather policy.

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New York City Audubon
Saturday, July 20, 2019, 9:00am – 10:30am
Van Cortlandt Bird Walks, The Bronx
Saturdays, April 27-July 20, 9-10:30am
Guide: NYC Audubon with the Van Cortlandt Park Conservancy
Meet at Van Cortlandt Nature Center. The history of birding and Van Cortlandt Park are inseparable. Influential birders such as Roger Tory Peterson and Allan D. Cruickshank got their starts on Van Cortlandt’s ecologically diverse grounds. These walks celebrate the tradition set by these great ornithologists. Participants will look for various species of residents and migrants and discuss a wide range of avian topics. For more information, call 212-691-7483. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

Sunday, July 21, 2019, 8am – 3pm
Birding Gems of Staten Island: Freshkills Park
Guides: Cliff Hagen with NYC Department of Parks & Recreation
Meet at the Staten Island Ferry and start your trip with a journey across the Upper Bay. This is a special opportunity to see Freshkills Park in transition from what was once the world’s largest landfill into an expansive park. Currently closed to the general public, the Park is home to rolling grasslands, tidal marshes, successional woodlands, and a freshwater pond system that host an array of breeding birds, butterflies, mammals, frogs, and turtles. Grasshopper Sparrows, Osprey, Yellow Warblers, and Blue Grosbeaks nest alongside wrens, blackbirds, orioles, and shorebirds. Wading birds feed on the mudflats at low tide while hawks and vultures soar above. On calm, sunny days, one can expect to find nearly two dozen species of butterflies as they nectar among the grasses and woodlands. Transport by passenger van from the Staten Island St. George Terminal included. Limited to 12. $64 (45)
Click here to register

Sunday, July 21, 2019, 2pm – 3pm
Governors Island Free Bird Walks
Saturdays, June 22, June 29, July 27, August 10 and August 24, 2-3pm
Sundays, June 16, July 21 and August 18, 2-3pm
Guide: NYC Audubon
Meet at Nolan Park House #17. Join us for a bird walk around beautiful and historic Governors Island, which boasts over 192 species recorded on ebird.org. Learn about the island’s fascinating history and search for waterbirds, raptors, waterfowl, and more. Binoculars are available. No registration necessary. No limit. Free

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New York Botanical Garden (Bronx)
Saturdays -- 11:00 a.m.
Debbie Becker leads a free bird walk at the Garden every Saturday from 11am to 12:30pm beginning at the Reflecting Pool in the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Meet at the Reflecting Pool at the Leon Levy Visitor Center
Included in All-Garden Pass
Get Tickets

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New York City WILD!
Saturday, July 20, 2019, 10:00am
NEW! Hardscrabble Ramble #3: Newtown Creek, Queens/Brooklyn

Sunday, July 21, 2019
NEW! Bridges of New York Sunset Walk: Triborough Bridges, Manhattan/The Bronx/Queens

For the full information about each walk click HERE

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Staten Island Museum
Saturday, July 20, 2019, 8:30pm-10pm
Moth Night
Location: Staten Island Museum, 1000 Richmond Terrace, Building A, SI, NY 10301
Cost: $10 per adult/Children under 12 Free
Stay up late and celebrate National Moth Week! Revel in the beauty and learn about the life cycles and habitats of moths. Featured activities include looking closely at Museum specimens, face painting, shadow dancing, art activities, and a short night hike through Snug Harbor.
Guests should bring flashlights. Presented in collaboration with the Staten Island Children’s Museum.
Registration recommended.
Click to Register

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Urban Park Rangers
Saturday, July 20, 2019
Bird Walks at Van Cortlandt Nature Center (in Van Cortlandt Park), Bronx
9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.
Join us in the park as we focus on wildlife happenings in the park on a walk led by NYC Audubon experts.
Free!

Rocking the Boat: Rowing and Birding at Hunts Point Riverside Park, Bronx
1:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Explore the Bronx River aboard student-built wooden rowboats, accompanied by staff who teach them about the local waterways.
Free!

Sunday, July 21, 2019
Orchard Beach Lagoon Birding Excursion (Intermediate) at Pelham Bay Park, Bronx
12:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.
Explore the Orchard Beach Lagoon, including Bartow Creek as we look for birds that live in this estuarine habitat of the Long Island Sound. Registration opens on July 10.
Free!
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Exploring urban nature, birds, birdwatching, birding, hummingbirds, butterflies, dragonflies, bees, hawks, raptors, wildflowers, trees, mushrooms, environment, binoculars, spotting scope