Saturday, April 29, 2017

New York City Rare Bird Alert

Below is the New York City Rare Bird Alert for the week ending Friday, April 28, 2017:

- RBA
* New York
* New York City, Long Island, Westchester County
* Apr. 28, 2017
* NYNY1704.28

- Birds mentioned
PACIFIC LOON+
WHITE IBIS+
RUFF+
(+ Details requested by NYSARC)

Wild Turkey
Cattle Egret
SANDHILL CRANE
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
RED-NECKED PHALAROPE
RED PHALAROPE
Iceland Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Glaucous Gull
Caspian Tern
Royal Tern
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Barred Owl
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Red-headed Woodpecker
Eastern Kingbird
Yellow-throated Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
Veery
Wood Thrush
American Pipit
Ovenbird
Worm-eating Warbler
Northern Waterthrush
Blue-winged Warbler
PROTHONOTARY WARBLER
Orange-crowned Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
American Redstart
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER
Black-throated Green Warbler
CLAY-COLORED SPARROW
SUMMER TANAGER
Scarlet Tanager
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
BLUE GROSBEAK
Indigo Bunting
Bobolink
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole

- Transcript

If followed by (+) please submit documentation of your report electronically and use the NYSARC online submission form found at http://www.nybirds.org/NYSARC/goodreport.htm

You can also send reports and digital image files via email to nysarc44(at)nybirds{dot}org.

If electronic submission is not possible, hardcopy reports and photos or sketches are welcome. Hardcopy documentation should be mailed to:

Gary Chapin - Secretary
NYS Avian Records Committee (NYSARC)
125 Pine Springs Drive
Ticonderoga, NY 12883

Hotline: New York City Area Rare Bird Alert
Number: (212) 979-3070

To report sightings call:
Tom Burke (212) 372-1483 (weekdays, during the day)
Tony Lauro at (631) 734-4126 (Long Island)

Compiler: Tom Burke, Tony Lauro
Coverage: New York City, Long Island, Westchester County

Transcriber: Ben Cacace

BEGIN TAPE

Greetings. This is the New York Rare Bird Alert for Friday, April 28th 2017 at 9pm. The highlights of today's tape are PACIFIC LOON, WHITE IBIS, RUFF, RED PHALAROPE, RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, SANDHILL CRANE, YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, PROTHONOTARY WARBLER, SUMMER TANAGER, BLUE GROSBEAK, CLAY-COLORED SPARROW plus Spring migrants.

An interesting mix of rarities this week included reports of 2 species of phalaropes. A RED briefly Wednesday off the northeastern edge of Randall's Island and 2 RED-NECKEDS Wednesday morning in the Old Inlet on Fire Island west of Smith Point County Park. There were no subsequent sightings of either and very interesting was a report of a WHITE IBIS flying northeast with Glossy Ibis over Valley Stream State Park this evening.

A black RUFF reappeared again Tuesday midday in the marsh north of the parking lot at Timber Point East Marina. This week's only sighting despite much searching. However on Thursday birders did spot a PACIFIC LOON just off shore. The loon ultimately swimming off behind a vent in the marsh.

The south fork SANDHILL CRANE was still at Wainscott Pond yesterday.

Of the two regional CATTLE EGRETS the lower Manhattan one was still on the north side of 28th Street between 8th and 9th Avenues today while the Bridgehampton bird was last reported Saturday around Mecox Road and Halsey Lane.

A southern big four among the passerines were all noted this week. PROTHONOTARY WARBLER was at least to yesterday still lingering at the Lido Beach Passive Nature Area off Lido Boulevard just west of Point Lookout. A today YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER was present today at the Point in Central Park. A BLUE GROSBEAK was in Prospect Park today and a SUMMER TANAGER briefly visited a small park along East 51st Street Thursday followed by a male at Jones Beach West End today. A lingering ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was still on Central Park Thursday and as noted in much of the NYC area the overnight southerly flow coupled with fog in the morning produced a nice migratory push into the region with decent numbers of warblers and other seasonal migrants dropping into local parks. Early arriving warblers for the week included WORM-EATING, MAGNOLIA, CHESTNUT-SIDED, BLACKBURNIAN, BLACK-THROATED BLUE, AMERICAN REDSTART and even BLACKPOLL along with more of NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, OVENBIRD, BLUE-WINGED, NASHVILLE, NORTHERN PARULA, BLACK-THROATED GREEN, YELLOW and COMMON YELLOWTHROAT.

A large variety of other landbirds has included a couple of YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOOS, RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD, EASTERN KINGBIRD, WOOD THRUSH and VEERY, RED-EYED, YELLOW-THROATED and WARBLING VIREOS, SCARLET TANAGER, ORCHARD and BALTIMORE ORIOLES, INDIGO BUNTING, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK and BOBOLINK. A highlight was a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW found at Central Park's north end today.

A couple of AMERICAN PIPITS were at Randall's Island Thursday. RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS include one still in Central Park west of East 68th Street and 2 at Pelham Bay Park in the Bronx last weekend. Among the other interesting Central Park visitors this week were WILD TURKEY and BARRED OWL. Both SOLITARY and SPOTTED SANDPIPERS are appearing in increasing numbers.

A CASPIAN TERN has been visiting Prospect Park Lake from Monday through today. Another stayed around Meadow Lake in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens Wednesday and Thursday and others have appeared recently. A ROYAL TERN was reported from Lido Beach Passive Nature Area Monday.

Five LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS and an ICELAND GULL were spotted at Heckscher State Park Tuesday and other ICELANDS include one lingering around the Brooklyn piers and one on Staten Island Sunday. A GLAUCOUS GULL was spotted in Bridgehampton Saturday.

Please note this new number for phoning in reports. Call Tom Burke at (914) 967-4922 and leave a message.

This service is sponsored by the Linnaean Society of New York and the National Audubon Society. Thank you for calling.

- End transcript

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