Sunday, July 31, 2005

Prospect Park today

Garden Phlox

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Green Bottle Fly

(Photo credit - Rob J)

I miss my hawks. At this time of year I would usually be following the fledglings as they learned to master their hunting skills. When they’d get hungry I would occasionally hear them making a whistled, whining sound. They’d fly around the park looking for the adults with the hope, I presume, that mom or dad would give them some food. The other night I had a dream that I stumbled upon a hidden hawk nest in the park. Two young hawks were walking up an angled, stairway-like branch. One of the adults was at the top tempting them with a fresh mouse. I needed to get into the park for a walk.

I spent three or four hours walking around Prospect Park. It had been about 3 weeks since my last long stroll around the park. When I was near Payne Hill I heard a young Red-tailed Hawk making a whining call from the vicinity of the Ravine. I started running towards the sound but as I did it began receding towards the Midwood. It was likely one of the offspring from the Ravine pine tree pair. I really wanted to find the bird and continued walking toward the Midwood.

The "usual" breeding birds were present in fairly large numbers but I found one unexpected species on my way to the Midwood. I had just walked over the Boulder Bridge and was heading towards the ridge overlooking the forest. As I approached an intersection in the foot paths I heard the hollow, "kowp, kowp, kowp, kowp, kowp" of a Yellow-billed Cuckoo. It surprised me because I've never heard one in the park at this time of year. I started to imitate him with the hope that he'd come out into the open. He eventually came into view near the top of a large oak tree. I continued my lame imitation when I heard a second one directly above me! He (or she) joined the first one and they continued foraging together in the treetops overlooking the Ravine stream. I suppose they are now breeding in the park.

Another Limax maximus

(Photo credit - Rob J)

I scanned the treetops in the Midwood but didn’t find the hawk. A Great Crested Flycatcher made a “wheep” call near the south end of the forest. Wild Blackberries have begun to ripen throughout the park. Black cherries still need another couple of weeks to ripen, but that didn’t stop some waxwings and robins from eating them.

Unripe cherries

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Wild Blackberries

(Photo credit - Rob J)

The wrought iron fence surrounding the Maryland Monument created a convenient perch for some dragonflies. Ten Blue Dashers looked like blimps on mooring masts as they each rested on their own iron spike.

Female Blue Dasher

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Male Blue Dasher

(Photo credit - Rob J)

As I returned towards the west side of the park I heard the calling Red-tailed Hawk again. This time he was somewhere behind the fences protecting the woods of Quaker Ridge. I scanned the trees for a few minutes then gave up and continued towards home. I made a final stop at an annual Cicada Killer colony on the Long Meadow. I stood in the center of a wasp jet-way watching the huge insects flying figure eight patterns around their burrows. These enormous insects paralyze their victims, drag them into their burrow and lay an egg on the living cicada. The resulting scenario is something like the plot from a George Romero film. Yum.

Cicada Killer with prey

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Down into the burrow

(Photo credit - Rob J)

- - - - -

Prospect Park, 7/31/2005
-
Red-tailed Hawk (Juvenile heard calling from Payne Hill and Quaker Ridge.)
Yellow-billed Cuckoo (2, foraging in trees adjacent to Boulder Bridge.)
Chimney Swift
Northern Flicker
Great Crested Flycatcher (Calling in Midwood.)
Eastern Kingbird (Several.)
Warbling Vireo (Near Nethermead Arches.)
Tree Swallow
Barn Swallow
House Wren (Butterfly Meadow.)
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Cedar Waxwing (Butterfly Meadow.)
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch

Other resident species seen (or heard):
Herring Gull, Rock Pigeon, Mourning Dove, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, Blue Jay, Black-capped Chickadee, American Robin, European Starling, Song Sparrow, Northern Cardinal, Red-winged Blackbird, House Sparrow

Thistle down

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Japanese Beetle on Elderberry

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Thursday, July 28, 2005

Looking for Seabirds

My alarm clock went off at 4:30am. I hesitated a moment before shutting it off and swinging my legs off the side of the bed. Sean and Shane would be in front of my apartment at 5:00am so I had little time to shake the fog from my head, eat some breakfast and collect my birding gear. We would be driving 40 miles east to Robert Moses State Park hoping to view some seabirds from the shoreline. Normally it would require a long boat trip towards the continental slope and Hudson Canyon to observe this family of birds but several had recently been reported close to shore. I didn’t have to be in the city until 1:00pm so the trio of sleepless birders would be together again for another “exciting” dawn.

Robert Moses State Park in the haze

(Photo credit - Rob J)

The haze at the ocean was so dense that we wouldn’t have been able to see a beached Blue Whale let alone a bird flying passed. The tiny, orange ball to the east was growing in size and trying to burn through the opaque air. We decided to stick around and wait to see if the haze would clear up.

Waiting for the haze to burn off

(Photo credit - Rob J)

To kill time we played a few innings of “Rum Ball”. It’s a new game that’s destined to become all the rage in birding circles. To play one first needs to locate a piece of driftwood approximately 36 inches long by 12 inches around. Rotted wood is a plus and drift aluminum is unacceptable. The next piece of equipment needed is a discarded plastic rum bottle, although a tequila bottle works in a pinch. Fill the bottle halfway with sea water. A pitcher then whips it to a batter armed with the driftwood. The rest of the rules pretty much follows baseball except that a batter who shatters the “Rum Ball“ automatically wins.

By 8:00am visibility had increased to about a quarter of a mile. The horizon was still an indistinguishable blur of water and sky but we could see some birds flying. Long winged Northern Gannets emerged from the haze on their way south. We used our scopes to scan continuously back and forth along a narrow stretch of visible ocean. Shane spotted the first shearwater as it flew west, parallel to the coastline. It was close enough to shore that I could have just used my binoculars. We all agreed that it was a Cory's Shearwater. We observed four more shearwaters but none were close enough to identify.

Catocala spp moth found on lifeguard chair

(Photo credit - Rob J)

By 9:30am we realized that the visibility wasn’t going to get any better so we packed up our scopes. Sean suggested a side trip to Cow Meadow Park in Freeport. The park includes a small saltmarsh where we would find shorebirds and, possibly, some unusual sparrows.

Fledgling Tree Swallow

(Photo credit - Rob J)

By the time we arrived at Cow Meadow Park the heat and humidity were stifling. There were several flocks of shorebirds on the exposed mudflats. A patrolling Peregrine Falcon flushed many more that had been hidden in the grass. Also in the area were fledgling Tree Swallows and three soon-to-be-fledged Osprey. With a little more time and patience we might have located more birds but the heat smothered any energy we had left from our early morning excitement.


-Click here for Angus Wilson's "Ocean Wanderers" website-

- - - - -

Robert Moses SP & Cow Meadow Park, 7/27/2005
-
Common Loon
Cory's Shearwater (Robert Moses State Park)
Northern Gannet
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
Osprey
Peregrine Falcon
Semipalmated Plover
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Spotted Sandpiper
Red Knot
Sanderling
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Common Tern
Least Tern
Tree Swallow
Barn Swallow
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
Yellow Warbler
Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow (Cow Meadow Park.)
Seaside Sparrow (Cow Meadow Park.)

Other resident species seen (or heard):
Canada Goose, Herring Gull, Rock Pigeon, Mourning Dove, American Crow, American Robin, European Starling, Song Sparrow, Red-winged Blackbird, House Sparrow

Saturday, July 23, 2005

Night birds on Staten Island

Shane & Sean at Saw Mill Creek

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Sean, Shane and I drove out to Staten Island on Thursday hoping to locate some nocturnal species for our year list. Before nightfall we stopped at Saw Mill Creek and walked the old railroad tracks in search of Seaside Sparrow and Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow. Of our three target species we managed to find one; Chuck-will's-widow. I'll post a more complete report later.

Thursday, July 28th

I never managed to follow-up this posting with more details in a timely manner, so here's the story. Apparently, Staten Island is the only New York City borough where Chuck-will's-widows still breed. A couple of weeks ago Shane heard some calling before dawn as he drove up Arthur Kill Road, in western Staten Island. He offered to drive to the spot at sunset to try and relocate the birds. We also wanted to check out the trails at Long Pond for Screech Owls and Whip-poor-wills.

We had a little time to kill before the sun went down so we stopped at Saw Mill Creek. This is one of my favorite locales on Staten Island. The creek and surrounding saltmarsh is bisected by an unused freight track. Walking the rails is always a challenge for me as the spacing of the wooden ties is shorter than my stride. I either have to take baby steps or extra long steps. I guess the design never took into account hobos and adventurous birders.

There was a pair of young Osprey and one of their parents perched on a nest platform in the saltmarsh. The adult bird made frequent, shrill whistles while circling the area or on the nest. We were far from the nest platform and I hope our presence wasn't causing him stress as the constant calling seemed peculiar.

As the sun was setting we drove south towards Clay Pits Pond, where Shane had heard the Chuck-will's-widow. There was a constant stream of cars and trucks passing the rural, forested neighborhood. After driving back and forth along a short stretch of road a few times we began to think that the nocturnal birds had moved on. We even parked on the side of the road and walked an old, unused road into the park. Shane pulled his car off of Arthur Kill Road next to a hardware center. He turned off the engine and we listened for any bird call. After about 30 seconds we heard a clear, rolling, "chuck-will's-widow, chuck-will's-widow, chuck-will's-widow, chuck-will's-widow". Another bird answered his call. We listened to their calls for a few minutes, high-fived each other, then headed off towards Long Pond.

Shane parked the car at the end of a dark road near the trailhead. As we exited the car we came to the brilliant conclusion that none of us brought along a flashlight. I tried to convince the others that our eyes would adjust to the darkness, but even I didn't believe it as we headed up the pitch black trail. Sean had his iPod with him and soon realized that the display's backlight gave off just enough illumination to keep us from breaking our necks. I don't think it's something Apple will be advertising any time soon but, amazingly, the iPod worked really well as an emergency flashlight. Unfortunately, we never located any Screech Owls or Whip-poor-wills, but we didn't break our necks, either.

Blue Dasher on car antenna

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Butter-and-eggs (Linaria Vulgaris)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Unknown shrub

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Osprey and chicks

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Sunset at Saw Mill Creek

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Wednesday, July 20, 2005

The Bees Knees

On the way to drop off my nephew, Brandon, at camp we spotted this awesome swarm of bees. The white column is located at the southwest corner of the Litchfield Villa, the administrative offices for Prospect Park. I suppose the queen bee was lured by the deep spaces between the carved ears of corn and sheaves of wheat.

Bee Swarm in Prospect Park

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Tuesday, July 19, 2005

Melting in New York City

Lotus Flower

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Today I felt like a candle in a pizza oven. Early this morning I walked my 12 year old nephew over to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. He's visiting from Charlotte and we have him enrolled in the "BCAP" camp for kids. By the end of our 15 minute walk we were both soggy from the heat and humidity. It's been a few years since I've felt such oppressive weather in New York. I had planned on spending the morning taking some photos at the garden but could only handle about 45 minutes.

Even the butterflies and dragonflies were slowed by the high temperature and humidity. They all seemed content to rest on their perches when I approached for a few close-up photos. Maybe when the heat snap passes I'll be able to spend more time looking for birds.

Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus) on a Purple Coneflower

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Spicebush Swallowtail (Papilio troilus)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)


(Photo credit - Rob J)

Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) on dried poppy

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Monday, July 18, 2005

Green lifestyle blog

Leopard Slug (Limax maximus) found in front of my apartment

(Photo credit - Rob J)

The wet, tropical weather this weekend made it tough to spend much time outdoors. In lieu of a nature report, here's a website I just discovered that I think you might find interesting. I'm adding it to my list of links:

The Treehugger Blog

Thursday, July 14, 2005

Eagle Cam

I just watched the most incredible videos. They were shot using miniature cameras mounted on a Golden Eagle's back. Check it out:

Animal Planet "Spy on the Wild"

Wednesday, July 13, 2005

Tern, tern, tern

Least Tern (Sterna antillarum)

(Photo credit - Steve Nanz)

The coastal areas around New York City and Long Island are host to numerous breeding seabirds. I am fascinated, in particular, by the legions of terns and their raucous colonies. Least Terns are one of my favorites to watch. These dainty, yellow-billed birds fiercely protect their nesting areas by dive-bombing anyone or anything. They hatch precocious young that waddle around when they are just a mere wisp of downy feathers. Common Terns are also fairly abundant breeders around New York. Both species are listed as “Threatened” in New York State.

Today Sean, Shane and I made the rounds of various Long Island locations. There had been a couple of postings of a rare tern seen a short distance from Westhampton Beach. We hoped that, with a little luck, we’d find that bird and a couple of other tern species. We ended our day with a stop at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge, optimistic that we would add a recently reported Gull-billed Tern to our ”Tern“ list.

American Copper (Lycaena phlaeas) at Rt. 51 bike trail

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Before driving out towards Shinnecock inlet we stopped at a grassland habitat in search of a different species. In Eastport there is a spot known by birders as ”The Rt. 51 bike path“. It is one of the declining areas on Long Island where Grasshopper Sparrows can still be found. I had never seen one but was feeling optimistic as Sean said it was a pretty good bet. Halfway around a short loop path we located a single, singing sparrow perched on a milkweed plant. We watched it for a short time then hopped back into the car and continued driving east.

Queen Ann's Lace (Daucus carota)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

-Click to learn more about Queen Ann's Lace-

-Click to learn more about Grasshopper Sparrows-

The Ponquogue Bridge is the eastern most access bridge to the barrier island before the break at Shinnecock Inlet. We stopped at a parking lot beneath the bridge to scan for birds before continuing the short distance to the inlet. Despite strong winds we spotted a variety of shorebirds, seabirds and waders. It was still pretty early in the day when we left the inlet parking lot and began driving west on Dune Road towards Cupsogue Park.

Shinnecock Inlet looking south

(Photo credit - Rob J)

-Click to learn more about the inlet history-

Cupsogue is a town beach with the Atlantic Ocean on the south side and Moriches Bay on the north. Where we parked, at the northwest corner of the lot, we could see an abundance of gulls and terns on the bay. There appeared to be a small island off the shore where birds were roosting. To get a closer look we had to walk a short distance down a 4-wheel drive road. That road intersected with a narrow trail which then gave us access to the bay. We scanned the flocks of terns from the end of the trail for a few minutes then walked east along the beach until we were opposite the small island (I think it’s called Swan Island). It is nearly in line with the west end of the parking lot. I’m not very proficient at tern identification and after a while they all began to look the same. Finally Sean calmly said, ”I found something very interesting on the island“. It was a first year Arctic Tern (they don’t develop full adult plumage until their third year). The stubby-legged bird was resting on the shore among the Common Terns. His thin, black bill, white crown and waddling walk made him stand out from the other birds. I took some photos through Shane and Sean’s spotting scopes. A few minutes later a Black Tern landed on the same stretch of sand. The inky plumed tern presented an even more pronounced contrast next to the Common Terns. He seemed a bit cranky, snapping at all the other terns. He ended up standing by himself at the left edge of the beach.

Egrets on Dune Road

(Photo credit - Rob J)


Moriches Bay looking north

(Photo credit - Rob J)

First year Arctic Tern (Sterna paradisaea)


(Photo credit - Rob J)

I had just seen two beautiful, unusual seabirds and would have been perfectly happy to go straight home. Instead, we decided to stop at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge where we could possibly add two more species of tern - Forster’s and Gull-billed.

Bouncing bet (Saponaria officinalis)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Yucca (Yucca filamentosa)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

-Click to learn more about Yucca-

After parking near the temporary visitor’s center we crossed Crossbay Boulevard. As we walked towards the south end of the East Pond I noticed the invasive wildflower ”Bouncing Bet“ in bloom within tangles of Poison Ivy. The southflats were pretty quiet so we backtracked and took the trail towards ”The Raunt“, at the center of the pond. Towering Yucca plants are blooming near the head of that trail. We added Forster’s Tern at the Raunt then headed back to the West Pond. At the West Pond we were surprised to see that a few Gadwall, wigeon, Northern Shoveler and Ruddy Duck were still present. A single Blue-winged Teal was also still hanging around. By this time of year they are usually on their breeding grounds.

We had one tern to go and Sean managed to spot it as it flew over the trail near the first bench. The Gull-billed Tern is probably the only tern that I can identify with a quick look. So far, unlike other terns, its unique shape, flight and bill stands out in my minds eye. Incredible we ended our day having seen Gull-billed Tern, Roseate Tern, Common Tern, Arctic Tern, Forster's Tern, Least Tern and Black Tern!

It probably sounds a little weird but when Sean, Shane and I are together we always seem to find very good birds. I’m generally not superstitious but maybe I shouldn’t have said anything.

- - - - -

Eastport, Shinnecock, Cupsogue & JBWR, 7/12/2005
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Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
Glossy Ibis
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Ruddy Duck
Osprey
Northern Harrier
Black-bellied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Piping Plover
Killdeer
American Oystercatcher
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Willet
Spotted Sandpiper
Ruddy Turnstone
Red Knot
Sanderling
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Great Black-backed Gull
Gull-billed Tern
Roseate Tern
Common Tern
Arctic Tern
Forster's Tern
Least Tern
Black Tern
Black Skimmer
Chimney Swift
Eastern Kingbird
Fish Crow
Tree Swallow
Barn Swallow
House Wren
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
Cedar Waxwing
Yellow Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrow
Common Grackle
Boat-tailed Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole
House Finch
American Goldfinch

Other resident species seen (or heard):
Canada Goose, Mute Swan, American Black Duck, Mallard, Herring Gull, Rock Pigeon, Mourning Dove, Downy Woodpecker, American Crow, American Robin, European Starling, Song Sparrow, Northern Cardinal, Red-winged Blackbird, House Sparrow

Trumpet Creeper (Campsis radicans) at JBWR

(Photo credit - Rob J)

-Click to learn more about Trumpet Creep-

Sunday, July 10, 2005

Prospect Park after the thunderstorm

Unripe Pokeweed berries (Phytolacca americana)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Tiger Lily (Lilium spp)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Sometimes I get consumed by sounds. That’s not to say that I have unusually acute hearing or a better than average ability to discern sound sources. I just mean that I frequently find myself absorbed in natural sounds and their sources to the point where my mind blurs the visual canvas. I love music but I don’t wear headphones when I’m outdoors as it disconnects me from my surroundings. When I walk through Prospect Park I’m not just looking for seasonal changes but also listening for them.

Gray Catbird incubating second brood (Dumetella carolinensis)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

There are now dozens of young birds learning to survive in this city park. It seems like there are fledgling robins calling out from every habitat. Their barely audible, high-pitched squeals are similar to the ring of Cedar Waxwings. “Gangs” of brown, juvenile starlings make irritating, squawking noises that could drive a mother bird crazy. I located a few fledgling catbirds by their sharp chips as they tried to stay hidden within thorny, multiflora rose shrubs. Two pairs of catbirds, one near the Litchfield Villa and one at Rick’s Place, were back on their nests incubating a second brood. Many of the park’s Black Cherry trees have begun fruiting. A chorus of high, thin whistles from the top of one cherry tree pointed me to a small flock of waxwings.

Within the next few weeks I should begin to hear the rolling rattle of cicadas during the day and the measured ticking of katydids during the night. Today, as I walked passed the north side of the Picnic House, I spotted a large beetle clinging to the stalk of a pokeweed plant. I pushed a leaf aside so I could take a photo and the agitated creature opened his huge pinchers as if to say, “Back off”.

Reddish-brown Stag Beetle (Lucanus capreolis)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

I walked quickly through the Midwood as the sky sudden turned charcoal gray. I heard claps of thunder in the distance and, in the darkness of the forest, a Wood Thrush’s flute-like “ eee-ooh-lay” suddenly took on a haunting quality. An Eastern Wood-Pewee in the same area of the forest seemed aware of the imminent storm and cried out a single, down-slurred “peeyuur“ before heading for cover. I had barely made it into the Nature Center when the clouds burst their seams. While waiting for the rain to subside I used their computers to research the beetle I had photographed earlier. I learned that it was a male Reddish-brown Stag Beetle.

I stood under the green and white striped canopy on the Nature Center’s balcony and watched a family of Barn Swallows frolicking in the rain. For the last few years a pair of these swallows has been building their mud nest on the archway over one of the center’s entrances.

Barn Swallow nest (Hirundo rustica) on Nature Center

(Photo credit - Rob J)

I watched a very peculiar behavior by a catbird at the Butterfly Meadow on Lookout Hill. It appeared to be a recently fledged individual as it still had a lot of yellow at the corners of his bill. He was perched in the sun on a bare oak branch. I’ve observed a number of birds sunbathing in the past but what was odd about this guy was that he was leaning to one side. Occasionally he would straighten up, preen some feathers and then go back to sunning at a slight angle. I guess it was just a comfortable position.

Drunk catbird ?

(Photo credit - Rob J)

On my way back to the east side of the park I spotted a family of chickadees foraging at the top of an oak tree. The juvenile birds trailed behind their parents begging for a handout by chirping loudly and fluttering their wings.

- - - - -

Prospect Park, 7/9/2005
-
Green Heron (Duck Is.)
Black-crowned Night-Heron (Flying along Lullwater and over Terrace Bridge.)
Ruddy Duck (1, Prospect Lake.)
Laughing Gull (1, Prospect Lake.)
Chimney Swift
Eastern Wood-Pewee (Midwood.)
Warbling Vireo (Peninsula.)
Tree Swallow (Near the pools.)
Barn Swallow (4, in front of boathouse.)
House Wren (At least 2, Peninsula & Lookout Hill.)
Wood Thrush (Midwood.)
Gray Catbird (Common.)
Cedar Waxwing (Peninsula.)
Eastern Towhee (Quaker Cemetery.)
Common Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Baltimore Oriole (Near boathouse.)

Other resident species seen (or heard):
Canada Goose, Mute Swan, American Black Duck, Mallard, Herring Gull, Rock Pigeon, Mourning Dove, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, Blue Jay, Black-capped Chickadee, American Robin, European Starling, Song Sparrow, Northern Cardinal, Red-winged Blackbird, House Sparrow

Goldenraintree (Koelreuteria paniculata)

Photographed near the Maryland Monument
(Photo credit - Rob J)

Great Blue Skimmer female (Libellula vibrans)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Oakleaf Hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

Common Burdock (Arctium minus)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

American Hornbeam fruits (Carpinus caroliniana)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

White Campion (Silene latifolia)

(Photo credit - Rob J)

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