Friday, February 11, 2005

Funny owl story

A temporary birding speed bump


Until I'm back in the saddle, so to speak, I may just be passing on some interesting stories and photos. Below is a great owl story that I just received from my friend Roberto Cavalieros:

"Rob,

Last year I was visiting my brother in Brasilia; we had just returned to his house from a road-trip when I heard flapping upstairs; this female Burrowing Owl had somehow entered the house and layed an egg on the couch!! It later left through the windows we opened but left its egg on the couch...

Roberto"


Owl in the rafters

(Photo credit - Roberto Cavalieros)

6 comments:

Dani said...

Don't tell me you have to keep your arm in that position for 3 weeks? Ouch.

Rob J. said...

It's made out of foam rubber so I just kind of drag it around with me. It actually makes sleeping pretty easy. This has been over a 2 year process for me after a cycling accident in 2002. I prefer this "appliance" to the last fiberglass cast. Doc says I should be good as new by spring migration.

Anonymous said...

Rob,

Just came across your Blog and I have a season related bird question for you. Does a Robin's arrival signify an early spring? I was in the yard a short while ago and I saw a couple of Robins that usually nest and spend the non winter momths here. This is the first year taht I remember seeing them in February. At the earliest then would come the first week of March, but usually Mid March. Whenever I see them I know that winter is drawing to a close. Maybe you can provide some insight...Thanks! Vin

Rob J. said...

Hi Vin,

That's a tough question. Robins are the most common and widespread of the thrush family. It's possible that you are just seeing over-wintering individuals (there have been a couple of hundred lately in Prospect Park). I'm not sure where you are located but according to "Bull's Birds of NY State", migrants usually arrive in late Feb or early March downstate, about a week later upstate; they depart by late Nov." Many species of birds are motivated to migrate by the length of the day not the temperature. Here's a great book on the subject:

"Living on the Wind"
by Scott Weidensaul

Rob

Vin said...

Thanks so much Rob for your response. I actually live in Howard Beach right near the Jamaica Bay Refuge. After reading more of your blogs I noticed that you spotted robins out on eastern LI. I was motivated to ask about the Robins because they appeared about 3 weeks early this year. They were always a reliable sign that the harshest part of winter was over with their arrival. I always have a nesting pair on my property every year I wondering if these are from the same family line...

Dani said...

Rob...
May I ask, what did you do to your poor arm that has required such a long recovery process? I guess it was more than just a broken bone. :(

To Vin...
I'm in Western Suffolk and for the past few years I've had 2-3 Robins stay around my property throughout the winter. They have plenty of natural food sources in my area, though. I suppose that has a great deal to do with it.
This year I've been seeing more than usual all over the island.

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